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Tuesday, 28 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Two flaws found in Firefox

Filed under
Security

A security company has reported two new flaws in the Mozilla Firefox browser that may leave locally saved files vulnerable to outside attacks.

Inside the $100 laptop’s security spec

Filed under
OLPC

Ivan Krstić mission to make the $100 laptop a monoculture of impossible targets shifted into high gear with the public release of Bitfrost, an architecture-level specification covering the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) security model.

Ooh! Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Free and open source software is becoming more and more popular among people who aren’t computer experts. If I had my way, I’d tell everyone to stop using Windows altogether. I have been personally testing the Ubuntu distribution since last fall and I love it.

KDE news: Kamion, Step, Phonon

Filed under
KDE

The commit digest issue 44 had a note that Kamion, a user data migration tool, has been added to the SVN and is pretty far in development (already with a first GUI). Troy Unrau, once again, posted an excellent article about a future KDE 4 technology. This time he wrote about the state of the art of Phonon.

Also: KDE 4's Sonnet will turbocharge language processing

Linspire sheds light on new "wiki-ized" CNR

Filed under
Software

Several weeks ago, desktop Linux distributor Linspire Inc. announced that it was going to open up CNR (Click N Run), its Web-based software downloader/manager, to other distributions. Now, the company is revealing more about what this new Linux software distribution system will look like.

Tutorial: Playing around with MPlayer & Other Howtos

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HowTos

This tutorial handles about the usage of the wonderful media player MPlayer. It explains several options, lists some useful keyboard shortcuts and handles about tips and tricks that can be used to enhance your multimedia experience.

Unifying Desktop Search

Filed under
Software

Wasabi is a new proposal on FreeDesktop.org for a unified desktop search and metadata specification. I'm not qualified to comment on the specifics of the proposal, but I definitely like the vision.

Microsoft is more serious about Linux than Oracle

Filed under
Linux

Do you remember the story about the dog that didn't bark? It was a Sherlock Holmes tale where the world's finest detective deduced the killer's identity by observing that a certain dog, who should have been barking ferociously, was in fact completely silent.

OpenSUSE 10.2 Impressions

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Reviews
SUSE

After becoming fed up having to fix a broken system on almost every major update, I decided it was time to move away from Ubuntu, at least for a while. But which distro to pick? Taking a look around DistroWatch, I noticed OpenSUSE had gained a lot of popularity.

Why a secret patent deal won't help Linux/Windows

Filed under
Interviews

LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit speaker Jeremy Allison explains some tricky details of Linux/Windows interoperability, what the Novell/Microsoft deal really does for interoperability, and a vision for a future easy-to-administer network filesystem.

Win4Lin Pro Desktop 3.5 review

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Reviews

For several years, Win4Lin has offered a virtual operating environment whereby you can run Microsoft Windows inside of GNU/Linux. The first several generations of Win4Lin were limited to Windows 98, difficult to install, and had requirements that were difficult to satisfy, such as a proprietary kernel module and various acts of command line kung fu. Version 3.5 still has some of these problems, but it's nowhere near as bad as it used to be.

Is Red Hat in trouble?

Filed under
Linux

Lately, I've been getting questions about how well, or not, Red Hat is doing. I know that Oracle is coming after them. And, I know that Novell and Microsoft's partnership, problems and all, has given Novell's SLES 10 (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server) some unexpected sales.

Raymond, Nelson critical of new planned license for open source peripherals

Filed under
Legal

Tucson Amateur Packet Radio (TAPR) is sponsoring a plan to encourage and popularize the idea of open source -- for hardware components. The organization released a draft of an open source license for computer hardware this month, and issued a public call for comments on the draft. The new license is already drawing criticism from prominent members of the open source community.

Read more

Review: Sabayon Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

There is a newer distro in town, gaining traction. Sabayon Linux is an installable, Gentoo based live Cd/DVD. It has the stated goal of being 100% Gentoo compatible. A lot of attention has been paid to the Sabayon brand. Theming is consistent and striking. Sabayon is one of the best looking distros I have used.

New Open Source Group to Focus on Apps

Filed under
OSS

A new open source advocacy group is about to launch with a focus on applications rather than open source standards, internetnews.com has learned.

UnixODBC CLI Install and Configuration

Filed under
HowTos

For those of you that may not know what unixodbc does, "ODBC is an open specification for providing application developers with a predictable API with which to access Data Sources. Data Sources include SQL Servers and any Data Source with an ODBC Driver." They include a text file driver as an example of a non-SQL source. Two examples are Asterisk and OpenOffice.org.

Micro How-To: MySQL

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HowTos

MySQL communicates through either local unix sockets or over TCP/IP port 3306 (default). Database names, tables, field names, and passwords are case sensitive. SQL Commands are not case sensitive.

Free Works in Africa

Filed under
OSS

iSolemamba school is in Durban, South Africa. Like every other school on the planet, it needed a computer lab. Basic infrastructure costs were covered, but there wasn't much money left over to buy computer equipment. Fortunately for the school was Linux and open-source software.

Testing RAID-1 on OpenSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

As I described in another post, I wanted to test RAID technology on my GNU/Linux OpenSUSE configuration. My intent is to see what happens when a hard drive fails, as it is supposed to protect me against it. But I prefer to test rather than believe the hype. Just after that I will need to observe what happens when we plug a new drive to replace the failed one. And I will suppose that once again it’s a different drive.

Debian release may slip to March

Filed under
Linux

The release of the upcoming version of Debian may slip to March, according to one of the two release managers for the Linux distribution.

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More in Tux Machines

Five reasons to switch from Windows to Linux

Linux has been in the ascendancy ever since the open source operating system was released, and has been improved and refined over time so that a typical distribution is now a polished and complete package comprising virtually everything the user needs, whether for a server or personal system. Much of the web runs on Linux, and a great many smartphones, and numerous other systems, from the Raspberry Pi to the most powerful supercomputers. So is it time to switch from Windows to Linux? Here are five reasons why. Read more

today's leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services
    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.
  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website
    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.
  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess
    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems. That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff. The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.
  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?
    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack. In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.
  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud