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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story User Liberation: Watch and share our new video Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2014 - 12:17pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2014 - 11:28am
Story Android 5.0.2 Review: 9 Tips for Nexus Users Rianne Schestowitz 30/12/2014 - 1:18am
Story Lava Iris 310 Style With Android 4.4 KitKat Launched at Rs. 3,749 Rianne Schestowitz 30/12/2014 - 1:05am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 6:12pm
Story MozJPEG 3.0 Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:28pm
Story USB Flash Drive File-System Tests On Fedora Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:26pm
Story Intel Haswell HD Graphics End Of 2013 vs. 2014 Benchmarks Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:22pm
Story Best open source in government: policies, new tools, and case studies Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:18pm
Story 'One frickin' user interface for Linux' Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:12pm

Vespa: My Pink Dell Mini9 w/ Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware

princessleia.com: I’ve wanted a pink laptop for ages, this Christmas a few of my friends got together and pitched in to buy me the pink Dell Mini9 I’d been drooling over for months.

Aircraft Manager: Save Battery By Turning Off WiFi and Bluetooth

Filed under
Software

ubuntumini.com: One of the sacrifices I had to make when choosing to install Ubuntu 8.10 was that there would be no way to turn off wifi and bluetooth. The battery would drain faster because I would have to keep them powered when not using them. Recently it was brought to my attention that there is a Aircraft Manager .deb.

Linux 2.6.28 Kernel Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The Linux 2.6.28 kernel was released this past week in time for the holidays. This quarterly update to the Linux kernel brought the stabilization of the EXT4 file-system, the Graphics Execution Manager, a host of new drivers, and a variety of other updates. For some weekend benchmarking we had tested the latest Linux 2.6.28 kernel.

Linux vs Windows . . . TomTom GPS

Filed under
Software

tycheent.wordpress: My wife gifted me with a TomTom ONE 125 GPS navigator. On charging it up and connecting it to my computer, I discovered that Microsoft had struck again.

What is a Window Manager

Filed under
HowTos

computingtech.blogspot: X-windows is a system that divides the labor up quite a bit. An X-windows application draws and controls only the area "inside" the window, the so-called client area. A totally separate program, called a "window manager" paints the borders and controls (such as resizing edges, maximize, minimize, and close buttons).

Why Current Linux-Preinstalls Pose Adoption Problems for Netbook Users

Filed under
Linux

molkentin.de/blog: This christmas, Santa brought an Acer Aspire One (A110L) for my mother, a not so techy person. It's supposed to be simple and useful. And at first glance, that's true: It comes with Firefox, OpenOffice, etc. Unfortunately, there is also a downside.

Novell Calls Off BrainShare 2009

Filed under
SUSE

linuxinsider.com: Novell Inc. said Wednesday it has canceled its 2009 BrainShare, the annual conference that this year drew 5,500 to the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City.

My Tribe - An enjoyable resource management game for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

linuxhelp.blogspot: My Tribe is the latest game from Grubby Games - the creators of Prof Fizzwizzle and Fizzball. Grubby Games are known for releasing Linux versions of all their games. My Tribe game also has a Linux version. The first time I started playing the My Tribe game, I was taken in by its vivid graphics.

A Linux Christmas Carol explained

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: On Christmas Eve I suggested what "Jingle Bells" may look like if it were a Linux shell script. Here it is for those who missed out, and some interpretation for those who didn't.

Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop Customization Guide

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: Because many people complained a lot about the looks of the new Ubuntu OS and other major Linux distributions, and how they wanted a more eye-candy, professional desktop, we thought that the following tutorial would be a nice Christmas Gift for all of you Linux enthusiasts out there.

OpenSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE

valdyas.org: I thought it'd be a tolerably good idea to celebrate boxing day with installing OpenSUSE 11.1. After all, given that this laptop is a Thinkpad X61t with built-in tablet, installing a new version of any distribution tends to be interesting.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Is Windows 7 Really A Linux Killer?

  • atool: handling archives without headaches
  • The NetSlave Quiz - Unix And Linux Humor
  • Contributing to a Project with a Maintainer Who Doesn't Merge Contributions Quickly
  • VLC Christmas Easter Egg
  • RedHat’s new oVirt virtualization host looks promising
  • cpio - copy files to and from archives
  • How to install NetBeans 6.5 on Ubuntu Linux desktop edition

DSL vs Puppy Linux

Filed under
Linux

aronzak.wordpress: Today, in Ken Hess’s Linux Blog, the top 10 Distrowatch distros are listed as ones to try out by downloading and burning them to disc or virtualising. What annoys me is that Damn Small Linux (abbreviated DSL because it’s a bad name) got into that list, but not Puppy Linux. Why?

passing between years

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: The calendar in my Plasma panel says that soon we will have gone through all the days allocated for 2008 and will start in on 2009. While a rather arbitrary line in time, calendar year-ends are a convenient time to look both back and forward. KDE sits between two great years in its history and therefore there is much one can reflect upon as well as look forward to.

An exclusive interview with Martin Nordholts (of GIMP)

Filed under
Interviews

jcornuz.wordpress: For a long time I wanted to do an interview with one of the GIMP developers. Then I came across Martin Nordholts (aka enselic) website. I decided he was the man and bugged him for an interview.

Obligatory Year-End Positive Linux Predictions

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: Almost every year end, most blogs - magazines - publications and so called “Linux gurus” makes mostly positive predictions about the future of Linux and it’s market share. Following this tradition, it’s only fair that I too share with you my Linux predictions for 2009.

The Definitive Guide to Open Source Hardware - 2008

Filed under
Hardware

googlelunarxprize.com: Again this year MAKE Magazine blog has publishes the annual Open Source Hardware Guide listing no less than 60 open source hardware projects, ranging from simple microcontroller boards to a fully functional cell phone. Open source hardware are projects where the designers have decided to publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files necessary to recreate the hardware.

The Internet is the tree, open source the fruit

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: One of the big journalistic trends of 2008 was to call every new Internet paradigm open source. This was both a compliment and a warning.

Quick Thoughts on Amarok 2.0

Filed under
Software

jintoreedwine.wordpress: I was very pleased to hear that Amarok 2.0 had finally been released and I have been awaiting it for some time now. I had heard stories of people not liking the new interface, but I didn’t have much of an opinion on it because I hadn’t used it.

Win to Mac – Why not move to Linux?

Filed under
OS

mac.blorge.com: We are documenting the move of a business user from the Windows platform on a PC to the OS X platform on a Mac. Why would such a user move to the Mac and not to Linux?

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.

Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer

  • Five free photo and video editing tools that could save burning a hole in your pocket and take your creativity to the next level
    GIMP stands for the Gnu Image Manipulation Program and is the first word that people usually think about when it comes to free image editors. It’s a raster graphics editor, available on multiple platforms on PC. It has a similar interface to Photoshop: you have your tools on one side, there’s an option for your tool window and then you have your layers window on another side. Perhaps one of the most useful features of GIMP is the option of plugins. There is a wide database for them and there’s a plugin for almost any task you might need to carry out. GIMP is extremely extensive, and it’s the choice of the FOSS community, thanks to the fact that it’s also open source. However, there are also some disadvantages. For example, GIMP has no direct RAW support yet (you have to install a plugin to enable it, which means a split workflow). It also has quite a bit of a learning curve as compared to Photoshop or Lightroom.
  • Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment
    If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.
  • SMPlayer 18.2.2 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA
    SMPlayer is a free media player created for Linux and Windows, it was released under GNU General Public License. Unlike other players it doesn't require you to install codecs to play something because it carries its own all required codecs with itself. This is the first release which now support MPV and some other features such as MPRIS v2 Support, new theme, 3D stereo filter and more. It uses the award-winning MPlayer as playback engine which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats (avi, mkv, wmv, mp4, mpeg... see list).

Funding: Ethereum and Outreachy

  • How Will a $100 Mln Grant Help Ethereum Scale?
    On Feb. 16, six large-scale Blockchain projects OmiseGo, Cosmos, Golem, Maker and Raiden, that have completed successful multi-million dollar initial coin offerings (ICOs) last year, along with Japanese venture capital firm Global Brain have created the Ethereum Community Fund (ECF), to fund projects and businesses within the Ethereum ecosystem.
  • Outreachy Is Now Accepting Applications For Their Summer 2018 Internships
    This week Google announced the participating organizations for GSoC 2018 for students wishing to get involved with open-source/Linux development. Also happening this week is the application period opened for those wishing to participate in the summer 2018 paid internship program.