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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Does the Raspberry Pi work with Windows? – Your tech questions answered Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2014 - 10:10am
Story Autovala: Auto-Generating CMake Files For Vala Code Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2014 - 8:51am
Story GNOME Maps App Features Much Smoother Animations Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2014 - 8:43am
Blog entry Over 8 Years of TuxMachines, by Nations Rianne Schestowitz 3 10/02/2014 - 8:36am
Story Growing the Linux Community Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2014 - 8:26am
Story Ubuntu 12.04.4 LTS Performance Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2014 - 8:07am
Story Google Nexus 8 rumored for April-end launch Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2014 - 11:37pm
Story Debian technical committee votes for systemd over Upstart Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2014 - 10:07pm
Story A Bunch Of Reasons Why I Use The GNU/Linux Operating System Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2014 - 4:44pm
Story kate: intelligent code completion for all languages! Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2014 - 4:05pm

Linux Valentines Day Gifts

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxblog.com: Valentines Day is coming up pretty fast. If you searched for this term you are probably wondering, “What should I get my Linux Geek for Valentines Day?”

Asus' Eee PC: Cute, Compact and Convenient - but Limited

Filed under
Hardware

linux insider: Overall, I found the Eee PC to be an affordable option for the traveler who needs to do only light computing, such as cursory Web browsing, checking e-mail, viewing photos and movies or listening to music. It would also be a great reference tool to keep on the kitchen counter or the coffee table, for quick searches.

State of Open Source Message: A New Decade for Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Bruce Perens: On February 9, 1998, I published the Open Source Definition and the public announcement of the Open Source Initiative that Eric Raymond and I were starting. This was the first time that the general public heard what Open Source was about. Saturday, February 9 is the anniversary of Open Source and the start of Decade One.

Ubuntu's Upstart event-based init daemon

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Because the traditional System V init daemon (SysVinit) does not deal well with modern hardware, including hotplug devices, USB hard and flash drives, and network-mounted filesystems, Ubuntu replaced it with the Upstart init daemon.

Open source rising

Filed under
OSS

expresscomputeronline.com: Things are looking good for the proponents of Open Source software on all fronts—even the desktop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Flock woos Netscape users with its social skills

  • EeeXubuntu Booting Great from SDHC on Asus EEE PC
  • A Microsoft secret plan for Yahoo's open source?
  • No Download iPlayer for GNU/Linux in 2008
  • New consulting company gambles on KOffice demand
  • Compiz 0.7.0 Adds Multi-Display Support
  • Splitting Files
  • Python for Bash scripters: A well-kept secret
  • checkinstall - trace your .tar.gz installations
  • Google Spreadsheets Form Feature is Fantastic!
  • Open Source Gets a Wall Street Boost
  • Is Linus Torvalds even speaking for Linux anymore?
  • OpenOffice And Understanding User Work Flow
  • Linux development platform makes the carrier grade
  • why do ubuntu users become arch users?
  • Become independent of the system tray using conky
  • Why Novell should become the center of the open source .NET universe
  • KDE rules

falling in love all over again

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: Most of the reviews i read or listen to about kde4 tend to focus on the "4 hour tour" stuff. If I were a journalist at this point i'd realize that this has already been done to death and I'd try looking for something that hasn't already been said.

Also: gwenview: falling in love all over again

Linus Torvalds at Linux.conf.au 2008

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com.au: Linus Torvalds is the star guest at Australia's annual Linux conference. ZDNet.com.au once again took a video crew to Melbourne in January and caught up with the man behind Linux.

Virtualization in Linux: A Review of Four Software Choices

Filed under
Software

techthrob.com: This week Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux, announced a partnership with Parallels, making the Parallels Workstation virtualization software is now available to download and install in Ubuntu Linux. This makes four different virtualization programs -- three of which are installable via the package repositories -- that run on Ubuntu Linux. This article compares the four virtualization products available.

Firefox 2.0.0.12 security and stability update now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing stability and security update process, Firefox 2.0.0.12 is now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. We strongly recommend that all Firefox users upgrade to this latest release.

Thinkpad X61s and Linux

Filed under
Linux

polishlinux.org: Looking for a lightweight, solid and powerful little laptop that works with GNU/Linux? Me too. I have bad news: it doesn’t not exist. Thinkpad X61s seems close, however. Here is my (success?) story about getting it to work with Ubuntu and Fedora with some tips and tweaks to save you time and patience.

Subtitle manipulation tools for Linux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Subtitles may not mean much for the English-speaking part of the world, but for the rest of us, they are the difference between truly enjoying a movie or just watching the screen, trying to decipher the events. From editing to ripping to converting, here is a list of some useful tools.

Damn Small Linux crushes Windows Vista’s min requirements

Filed under
Linux

tech.blorge.com: In contrast with most of its competition, Damn Small Linux (DSL) is an operating system where megabytes are still meaningful. Compare that to Windows Vista’s minimum 20 gigabyte footprint and the line in the sand becomes obvious.

Linux Air: Hitting the road with the Eee PC

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: As a computer-oriented Australian planning a six week trip to Canada and the USA, I was dreading the prospect of long-term lack of access to a computer. Enter the ASUS Eee PC.

If you're broke and need a decent computer, Ubuntu Linux may be for you

Filed under
Ubuntu

daytondailynews.com: You've looked at the newest Dell XPS, maybe a spiffy HP Pavillion. You've surfed over to Apple's Web store to drool over the powerful, stylish machines of Steve Jobs. But there's a problem: You're broke. There's still hope.

CEO Jim Whitehurst pilots Red Hat into future

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

infoworld.com: Whitehurst, 40, has big shoes to fill in replacing Szulik, the man who took a small, unknown company and turned it into a savvy business competitor that made Linux a household name. Whitehurst spoke with IDG News Service this week about the key findings of his first month on the job and where he thinks Red Hat should focus its attention.

Nina Reiser's Last Phone Call Was to Hans Reiser on Day She Vanished

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: The phone call from Nina Reiser's cell phone was placed to her estranged husband, Hans Reiser -- the popular Linux programmer who is accused of killing her, according to testimony here Thursday.

fast package management

Filed under
Software
SUSE

duncan.mac-vicar.com: We have been working hard to get package management stack changes in so we can have them in one of the next alphas. This new level of performance would allow us to bring package management on openSUSE not to the smart or yum level, but a complete new generation ahead.

Multiple external monitors, on a laptop, on Linux, with Tritton See2 USB video adapter / sisusb

Filed under
Linux

adamw’s blog: I’ve been planning for a while to buy a new desktop, replacing the laptop I’ve been using mainly due to a few irritants with the laptop. In the end, though, I’ve decided to try and address these problems with the existing system, which is really a fine system if I can just deal with these things.

some howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Hidden Linux : Tab-completion

  • Take screenshots of movie with Movie Thumbnailer
  • FreeBSD Set Speed Duplex For My NIC
  • Installing MySQL 5.1 on Kubuntu/Ubuntu
  • Optimizing Ubuntu II
  • A three step process for clean url's in Drupal for Debian Lenny
  • KDE 4.0: Add More Widgets for Your Desktop
  • Regular expressions in OpenOffice.org Calc functions
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming