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Monday, 20 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story How Linux is taking over the network srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 6:01pm
Story Female dev's outburst against Torvalds was planned srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 4:21pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 3:18pm
Story Delicious Raspberry Pi srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 1:58am
Story Khronos Releases OpenGL 4.4 Specification srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 1:56am
Story Ubuntu vs Xubuntu srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 1:55am
Story Open Source and the Gaming Industry srlinuxx 24/07/2013 - 11:38pm
Story Fedora 19 KDE review - The cat is dead srlinuxx 24/07/2013 - 11:34pm
Story NSA Exposes Cloud Computing’s Weakness srlinuxx 24/07/2013 - 11:31pm
Story Why journalctl is cool and syslog will survive for another decade srlinuxx 24/07/2013 - 8:20pm

1-Click Compiz Fusion onOpenSuse 10.3

Filed under
HowTos

abhay-techzone.blogspot: I have a three years old desktop with AMD 2400+ CPU, 640 MB RAM on a Via KM400 motherboard. I love my desktop as it helps me in experimenting with the latest and the greatest software and distribution releases. Currently I have OpenSUSE 10.3 on it. Its a fairly old computer so I could not try the latest eye candy on it, I am referring to compiz-fusion.

Playing With Themes in Ubuntu 7.10

Filed under
HowTos

geekybits.blogspot: In July I wrote a post which has been quite popular called: Turning Ubuntu's Brown Eyes Blue. This post was about changing themes in Ubuntu, getting away from the orange and brown colours and using mostly blue. Things have changed quite a bit since July and changing themes in the new Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) is a little bit different, therefore I thought I would offer some fresh advice.

My distro is redder than yours, so ner!

Filed under
Linux

What is needed here is a celebrity distro match, battle to the death. And in the blue corner, weighing in at 70lbs, wearing knobbly knees and a tank top, master of the inane, lord or pointlessness, it's Faaaaaaaanboy! And in the orangy corner, weighing in at 71.123984775lbs, taking into account a floating point error, compiled 1 second faster, the spark of the unholy distro...'buntu basher masher.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 227

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Ubuntu Studio 7.10

  • News: Indiana controversies, Mandriva vs Microsoft, OpenBSD 4.2 interview, Debian
  • KDE4 live CD, Fedora 8 and PulseAudio, end of Trustix

  • Released last week: OpenBSD 4.2, openSUSE 10.3 "Live"
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 8
  • Donations: NimbleX receives €300
  • New additions: Indiana
  • New distributions: Arktur, gOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Connect Firefox to TiddlyWiki with TiddlySnip

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: If you're using TiddlyWiki as your note-taking tool, you ought to give TiddlySnip a try. The idea behind this Firefox extension is simple: it allows you to add the currently viewed Web page or selected text snippet to your TiddlyWiki as a new tiddler. But TiddlySnip adds a few clever twists to this basic idea, which turn the Firefox/TiddlyWiki combo into a powerful and extremely useful tool.

Also: Prism Prototype Now Available on Mac and Linux

Bye bye Gentoo

Filed under
Gentoo

roys web: I never thought I would write this, but it's true. I've retired from Gentoo. It's been a fun ride, This is not a snap decision, I have been thinking about it in the back of my mind for a few weeks now. Why am I leaving?

Also: That guy is such an *asshat* (and so are you).

An introduction to the visual features of GNU Screen

Filed under
HowTos

debian-administration: Many people here use GNU Screen, and I've not seen extensive coverage of the things you can do with the status-line in the past, so I thought a brief overview of a couple of visual settings wouldn't be amiss.

Future Flash Linux Ready for A Fight with MPAA

Filed under
Linux
  • Watching DVDs in Linux: A Fight with MPAA

  • The Future of Flash in Linux
  • Linux Ready for Prime Time Desktop

A tale of two plug-and-play Linux boxes

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: As many of us who watch the Linux market know, the past week has seen the announcement of two markedly different plug-and-play Linux computers. I was excited by one and not the other. To my surprise, the one that didn't interest me has taken off like a rocket to the moon while it is still too early say how the other will do. The good news, however, is that desktop Linux has finally gone mainstream.

Monitor your drives to extend their life

Filed under
HowTos

tectonic: The problem is that modern laptops often have very aggressive power setups by default to, theoretically, guard against damage and reduce power consumption. But in doing so they may cause your disk drive to load/unload at more regular intervals than is reasonable.

Clearlooks Compact Gnome Theme

Filed under
Software

martin.ankerl.com: I have been using Ubuntu for quite a while now, but one thing I really dislike is that all the themes are huge space wasters compared to Windows XP. This finally got me angry enough to create a customized version of the Clearlooks theme.

Also: Update to Awn weather applet

Running FreeNX using a Mandriva 2008 Server

Filed under
HowTos

linux-tip.net: NoMachine NX is a Terminal Server and remote access solution based on a comprising set of enterprise class open source technologies. NX makes it possible to run any graphical application on any operating system across any network connection at incredible speed.

ubuntu, ubuntu, ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 10 Things Ubuntu Needs To Improve On

  • Ubuntu Gutsy With ExpressCard - Working Options
  • Ubuntu 7.10: Inflection Point or Tipping Point?
  • Weekly News #64
  • Linc Caves
  • Ubuntu Search Engine
  • Ubuntu Gutsy - there's something different about this one

Linux device driver drama: Who will deliver support, code sharing?

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Device drivers can make or break an operating system. The best engineered kernel is useless if applications running on it cannot interface with the outside world or if device manufacturers cannot readily support it with their wares.

I, Robot: The Man Behind the Google Phone

Filed under
Google

nytimes: If the effort succeeds, it will be the most drastic challenge to date of the assertion by Microsoft — the godfather of the desktop PC — that Google and other members of the so-called open-source world can imitate but not innovate.

Power-ups for Firefox: Add-ons bring added security and comfort

Filed under
Moz/FF

bangkok post: Firefox is known as the quintessential free browser. Users can not only download it free of charge, they can also expand its abilities in almost unlimited ways. A dedicated developer community makes this possible by programming and updating special extensions called add-ons.

How badly is CentOS hurting Red Hat?

Filed under
Linux

interopnews.com: Why does Red Hat tolerate CentOS? The Community ENTerprise Operating System is an identical binary clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (minus the trademarks), compiled from the source code RPMs that Red Hat conveniently provides on its FTP site. It is also completely free, as in beer.

Bumps on the Road to Document Exchange Nirvana

eWeeks blogs: At the heart of the rift between the Foundation and the rest of the ODF backers--led by Sun and IBM--lies a dispute over the proper strategy for achieving round-trip document fidelity between Microsoft Office and ODF-consuming applications, such as Sun's OpenOffice.org or IBM's Lotus Symphony.

KAlarm

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Remembering things. It’s something that a lot of us aren’t all that good at, without having something to trigger us. KAlarm is an application which is designed to allow you to set certain things to happen at certain times.

Archlinux tools: AUR

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: You already know Pacman, the Archlinux software manager. Now it’s time to meet AUR and yaourt, the extra tools that can bring a fistful of apps on your desktop within just a few console commands.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Debian SunCamp 2017 Is Taking Place May 18-21 in the Province of Girona, Spain
    It looks like last year's Debian SunCamp event for Debian developers was a total success and Martín Ferrari is back with a new proposal that should take place later this spring during four days full of hacking, socializing, and fun. That's right, we're talking about Debian SunCamp 2017, an event any Debian developer, contributor, or user can attend to meet his or hers Debian buddies, hack together on new projects or improve existing ones by sharing their knowledge, plan upcoming features and discuss ideas for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system.
  • Pieter Hintjens In Memoriam
    Pieter Hintjens was a writer, programmer and thinker who has spent decades building large software systems and on-line communities, which he describes as "Living Systems". He was an expert in distributed computing, having written over 30 protocols and distributed software systems. He designed AMQP in 2004, and founded the ZeroMQ free software project in 2007. He was the author of the O'Reilly ZeroMQ book, "Culture and Empire", "The Psychopath Code", "Social Architecture", and "Confessions of a Necromancer". He was the president of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure (FFII), and fought the software patent directive and the standardisation of the Microsoft OOXML Office format. He also organized the Internet of Things (IOT) Devroom here at FOSDEM for the last 3 years. In April 2016 he was diagnosed with terminal metastasis of a previous cancer.
  • foss-gbg on Wednesday
    The topics are Yocto Linux on FPGA-based hardware, risk and license management in open source projects and a product release by the local start-up Zifra (an encryptable SD-card). More information and free tickets are available at the foss-gbg site.

Leftovers: OSS

  • When Open Source Meets the Enterprise
    Open source solutions have long been an option for the enterprise, but lately it seems they are becoming more of a necessity for advanced data operations than merely a luxury for IT techs who like to play with code. While it’s true that open platforms tend to provide a broader feature set compared to their proprietary brethren, due to their larger and more diverse development communities, this often comes at the cost of increased operational complexity. At a time when most enterprises are looking to shed their responsibilities for infrastructure and architecture to focus instead on core money-making services, open source requires a fairly high level of in-house technical skill. But as data environments become more distributed and reliant upon increasingly complex compilations of third-party systems, open source can provide at least a base layer of commonality for resources that support a given distribution.
  • EngineerBetter CTO: the logical truth about software 'packaging'
    Technologies such as Docker have blended these responsibilities, causing developers to need to care about what operating system and native libraries are available to their applications – after years of the industry striving for more abstraction and increased decoupling!
  • What will we do when everything is automated?
    Just translate the term "productivity of American factories" into the word "automation" and you get the picture. Other workers are not taking jobs away from the gainfully employed, machines are. This is not a new trend. It's been going on since before Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin. Industry creates machines that do the work of humans faster, cheaper, with more accuracy and with less failure. That's the nature of industry—nothing new here. However, what is new is the rate by which the displacement of human beings from the workforce in happening.
  • Want OpenStack benefits? Put your private cloud plan in place first
    The open source software promises hard-to-come-by cloud standards and no vendor lock-in, says Forrester's Lauren Nelson. But there's more to consider -- including containers.
  • Set the Agenda at OpenStack Summit Boston
    The next OpenStack Summit is just three months away now, and as is their custom, the organizers have once again invited you–the OpenStack Community–to vote on which presentations will and will not be featured at the event.
  • What’s new in the world of OpenStack Ambassadors
    Ambassadors act as liaisons between multiple User Groups, the Foundation and the community in their regions. Launched in 2013, the OpenStack Ambassador program aims to create a framework of community leaders to sustainably expand the reach of OpenStack around the world.
  • Boston summit preview, Ambassador program updates, and more OpenStack news

Proprietary Traps and Openwashing

  • Integrate ONLYOFFICE Online Editors with ownCloud [Ed: Proprietary software latches onto FOSS]
    ONLYOFFICE editors and ownCloud is the match made in heaven, wrote once one of our users. Inspired by this idea, we developed an integration app for you to use our online editors in ownCloud web interface.
  • Microsoft India projects itself as open source champion, says AI is the next step [Ed: Microsoft bribes to sabotage FOSS and blackmails it with patents; calls itself "open source"]
  • Open Source WSO2 IoT Server Advances Integration and Analytic Capabilities
    WSO2 has announced a new, fully-open-source WSO2 Internet of Things Server edition that "lowers the barriers to delivering enterprise-grad IoT and mobile solutions."
  • SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says
    SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer. The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store. "If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background," warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.
  • “Active Hours” in Windows 10 emphasizes how you are not in control of your own devices
    No edition of Windows 10, except Professional and Enterprise, is expected to function for more than 12 hours of the day. Microsoft most generously lets you set a block of 12 hours where you’re in control of the system, and will reserve the remaining 12 hours for it’s own purposes. How come we’re all fine with this? Windows 10 introduced the concept of “Active Hours”, a period of up to 12 hours when you expect to use the device, meant to reflect your work hours. The settings for changing the device’s active hours is hidden away among Windows Update settings, and it poorly fits with today’s lifestyles. Say you use your PC in the afternoon and into the late evening during the work week, but use it from morning to early afternoon in the weekends. You can’t fit all those hours nor accommodate home office hours in a period of just 12 hours. We’re always connected, and expect our devices to always be there for us when we need them.
  • Chrome 57 Will Permanently Enable DRM
    The next stable version of Chrome (Chrome 57) will not allow users to disable the Widevine DRM plugin anymore, therefore making it an always-on, permanent feature of Chrome. The new version of Chrome will also eliminate the “chrome://plugins” internal URL, which means if you want to disable Flash, you’ll have to do it from the Settings page.

Linux Mint 18.1 Serena - The glass is half full

Linux Mint 18.1 Serena is an okay distro. It has more merit than Sarah, but then, it's also had almost a year to work on polishing some of the issues, and while a few have been ironed out, big quality issues that were never the domain of Mint before still persist. The live session experience is underwhelming, the default theme is not vibrant enough and can lead to ocular exhaustion quickly, there were problems with stability, multimedia playback, and the promise of Spotify never came to be. On the other hand, most of the stuff works out of the box, the repos are rich, the distro can be tamed relatively easily, and at the end of the day, you have a supported, popular system full of goodies and shiny colors with only a slight aftertaste of betrayal in your proverbial mouth. Good, but only if you've just started playing around with Linux. This distro has no flair. It doesn't have the magic and fire of yore. No fire, no nothing. It's not super green. And it must pop pop pop. So I guess, grade wise, 6.5/10 or some such. All in all, 'tis Linux Mint all right, but not the best offering by a long shot. Read more Also: Linux Mint 18.2 Features – What’s Ahead In the Next Release