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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story More Concept Designs for the Samsung Gear A Tizen Smart Watch Roy Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 8:16am
Story HandyLinux 2.0 Officially Released, Based on Debian 8 Jessie Rianne Schestowitz 16/05/2015 - 7:46am
Story Tor Browser 4.5.1 Released with Support for Ubuntu 14.04 LXC Hosts Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 11:28pm
Story Wine Announcement Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 11:18pm
Story Qt 5.5 Beta Released Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 10:58pm
Story Arduino shrinks Linux-ready Yún to “Mini” size Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 10:44pm
Story Popular arcade game emulator MAME is going open source Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 10:36pm
Story Elementary OS Freya: Is This The Next Big Linux Distro? Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 10:18pm
Story Announcing Rust 1.0 Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 9:54pm
Story Meizu to Announce Ubuntu Phone on May 18 - Rumor Rianne Schestowitz 15/05/2015 - 9:24pm

ATI Brought Me Solutions As Well As Problems

Filed under
Hardware

customdistros.com: I’ve been wanting to get a new, or at least different graphics card for a little while now. My past experience has been with NVIDIA cards and not with ATI so I figured I would be learning a thing or two with this card, especially with how it works with Linux.

Is Android the key to the GNU/Linux desktop? Really?

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I have been talking about the convergence of telephony and desktop computing for years. Nowadays, more and more companies are announcing small devices (“netbooks”) that will run Android — and we are not talking about phones here. Is this the beginning of a new revolution?

New release model for MySQL

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: The MySQL developers have presented a new release model for the development of the open source database.

Anti-Linux Perspectives and How to Deal

Filed under
Linux

everyjoe.com: Whether you are Linux newbie or a veteran, you have a perception of Linux and why you find it easy or difficult to use it, right? Trying to advocate Linux to others would take some knowledge about Linux. This is especially true for those who want to advocate it to their work place.

Why I Use Linux

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: Everyone that uses Linux has his or her own reason for doing so. Some prefer it outright, others may be sick of the politics surrounding other operating systems. I have been using Linux since around 2002 and it has been an incredible journey.

Review: Zenwalk 6.0

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com: Back in Nov of 2008 I checked out Zenwalk 5.2 and a recent LXF contained Zenwalk 6.0 - so let’s see what has changed.

What's new in Fedora 11

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: It's not just the new design and updated software that brings a sparkle to the eleventh version of Fedora (Leonidas), there are also a whole raft of technical enhancements.

Also: Fedora 11: No review

Benchmarks: gtk+ engines revisited

Filed under
Software

blogs.gentoo.org: Six months ago I posted some benchmarks of popular gtk+ engines. It's time to revisit those benchmarks and test the engines again, this time using FOSS drivers for my new hardware.

The Ubuntu/Mono debate continues…

Filed under
Software

theopensourcerer.com: Jo Shields writes a well written piece that articulates the position of a software developer who clearly likes what Mono has to offer. What strikes me with these posts is how technical and abstract the position of the developer is.

Best Ubuntu & Kubuntu Software to Add After Installation

Filed under
Software

techexposures.com: Canonical’s Ubuntu & Kubuntu distros are loaded with great software an utilities. There are, however, a bunch of great tools that are not included in their standard installations.

Memo to Canonical: Don’t Repeat IBM’s Mistakes

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: As Canonical polishes Ubuntu to potentially support Google Android and Moblin v2, I’m both impressed and concerned.

is ubuntu superior?

Filed under
Ubuntu

billkerr2.blogspot: Due to the agreement between our Education Department and Microsoft I work in a Microsoft centric environment. So when our network manager recently became very enthusiastic about the latest Ubuntu release (9.04), I asked him to spell it out. This is what he said:

Ubuntu 9.10 is getting an installation slideshow

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.ibeentoubuntu: The Ubuntu-Doc mailing list just received word from Dylan McCall and the Ubiquity Slideshow Team that Ubiquity (the Ubuntu live CD's installer) is being retrofitted with a slideshow that will play during installation.

The Perfect SpamSnake - Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope based server as a spamfilter in Gateway mode. In the end, you will have a SpamSnake Gateway which will relay clean emails to your MTA.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Vancouver becomes role model for open source

  • Gecko EduBook: The Tinkerer Netbook
  • Palm Pre, part 1: the BlackBerry killer
  • Red Hat: Go big or play it safe?
  • Palm Pre
  • Firefox 3.0.11 security and stability release now available
  • Open source will never do that...
  • Native Multi-Touch Support On Linux
  • Browsing your medias
  • KDE beta cycle
  • Ion-based Linux nettop soars in review
  • How Firefox Gets Grass-roots Marketing Right
  • Canonical Looking for KDE Developer
  • Karmic Koala Alpha 2 Released
  • New Atoms will double netbook battery life
  • Screencast: Virtual Machine Manager, Fedora 11
  • Microsoft plays recession card with Novell
  • Happiness is a warm SCM
  • New Novell tool to link Linux management to Microsoft System Center
  • Europe to get Windows 7 sans browser

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Display The List Of Recently Installed Packages By Date On Ubuntu

  • OpenOffice.org 3.1 outline level feature
  • Linux Dump Command Exclude Directories
  • Yum repomd.xml Error
  • Remote Login with GDM and VNC on Fedora 11
  • Printing Lables and Business Cards in Ubuntu
  • Quickly Empty Files in Vim
  • Howto Upgrade to Grub2 On Ubuntu
  • Install MS True Type Fonts in Fedora
  • openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 2 step by step install procedure

FireFox 3.5, Plugins and The Meaning of Life

Filed under
Moz/FF

daniweb.com/blogs: FireFox 3.5 is due out by the end of June and includes some pretty interesting new features--and not a moment too soon. I hate plugins. Hate them. They are the bane of my online existence. Why do I need plugins?

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.