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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu on TM

In memoriam: Linux evangelist and Linux.com editor Joe Barr

Filed under
Linux
Obits

linux.com: Our colleague Joe Barr sometimes described himself as a doddering old geek. Many knew him as a Linux evangelist; others knew him from his ham radio activities. And those of us who worked with Joe knew him in all of his sometime irascible, often funny moods. Joe was always one of our favorite people, and we are devastated to report that he died at home, unexpectedly, last night.

Brian Proffitt Joins Linux Foundation as LDN Community Manager

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

ostatic.com: After a long search, the Linux Foundation has found its community manager for its LSB Developer Network. The Linux Foundation has tapped Brian Proffitt, longtime managing editor of Linux Today, Enterprise Linux Today, AllLinuxDevices, LinuxPR, and JustLinux.

Patent violation, prosecution, acquisition: pick your top open-source project

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: The world of open source gets the equivalent of an Oscar awards ceremony later this month when code-host SourceForge announces the winners of its second-annual vote on the community's top projects.

Finally, Notes on Linux is here and ready

Filed under
Software

techworld.com.au/blog: Two years. Can you believe it's been two years to the day since IBM first released a native Lotus Notes client for Linux? Where did version 7.x go in that time? Pretty much nowhere. With an installation process like this, I wonder why.

Mandriva Corporate Desktop (what about it?)

Filed under
MDV

beranger.org: There was a recent discussion on the French Mandriva forum, about a possible free LTS version of Mandriva. Someone mentioned the Corporate Desktop and Corporate Server line — a paying one, à la RHEL and SLED/SLES. The only problem is that Mandriva Corporate Desktop is dead. It was killed using a silencer though.

some howtos & roundups:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How-To: Create CD/DVD ISO Images with K3b

  • 15 Minutes to a sweet Ubuntu install which can coexist with Windows
  • Howto: Gentoo Guest OS in VirtualBox
  • Using Screen, Script, Mkfifo And Redirection To Watch Or Log User Sessions
  • Flash not working with Firefox openSUSE 11.0
  • Fix JAVA plugin in Hardy Firefox
  • Howto Starting and Stopping Ubuntu
  • Make Ubuntu Faster and Smoother
  • Apps to View HTML files from Console
  • 4 Apps to Rip DVDs on Linux

Review: Acer Aspire One notebook computer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computeractive.co.uk: Miniature notebooks, which do all the jobs of full-sized ones but with slightly less power, seem to be the order of the day in 2008. The One looks smart, with a white case and shiny black bezel around the 9in 1,024x600 pixel screen.

SliTaz, a mighty micro Linux distro

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: SliTaz is a new micro GNU/Linux live distribution designed to run from RAM (a recommended minimum of 128MB) and installable to a hard drive or USB device. The current version, SliTaz 1.0, weighs in at a light 24.8MB and provides a nice selection of applications that run on a lightweight desktop.

Distro Review: Linux Mint 5 Elyssa

Filed under
Linux

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: Well it's review time again and today's candidate is Linux Mint 5. I say today's candidate but really I should say this months candidate as I ended up spending a lot more time on Mint than I'd planned. I really liked Mint 4 and gave it a rave review last year, so this new version would have to work hard to impress me, after 3 weeks with it on and off how does it stack up? Here goes...

GNU/Linux free software tools to preserve your online privacy, anonymity and security

Filed under
Security

Whether you are online or offline, freedom matters. Like good health you never think about it or miss it until it is under threat or actually gone. If you love freedom, you probably love free software and it has given us some terrific tools with which to defend freedom. In this article I will give an overview of some of the available resources (Freenet, Wikileaks and Tor) to protect dissident opinion, facilitate whistle blowing and promote the safe and anonymous development of free software.

Review of Foresight Linux 2.0.2.1

Filed under
Linux

codingexperiments.com: “Foresight is a desktop operating system featuring an intuitive user interface and a showcase of the latest desktop software” The question is, is this the case? Does it fulfill its goal? As it turns out, the July issue of Linux Format shipped with it a copy of Foresight Linux 2.0. On a whim, I tried that out.

Opera 9.52 snapshot "summer edition"

Filed under
Software

opera.com: We are still doing polishing on Kestrel and have some more crashfixes etc for you all to play with. Please look for regressions since 9.50

Another reason to love FOSS - Software Kill Switches

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: One thing I hate above almost anything else is when a vendor tells you what you can and can't do with your software. That drives me bonkers. So what brought on this little bout of ranting and bitterness?

Mandriva 2009 Alpha 2 Brings You a Beautiful KDE 4 Desktop

Filed under
MDV

softpedia.com: Mandriva announced last night the second alpha release of Mandriva 2009, which brings KDE4 (default desktop), GNOME 2.23.4, and support for the newest NVIDIA and ATI/AMD video cards. The development cycle of Mandriva 2009 will continue until the final release in early October, 2008. With the 2009 edition.

New Compiz plugins

Filed under
Software

compiz-fusion.org/~cyberorg: …some useful some not so, these are the new plugins available in compiz-fusion-plugins-git packages from openSUSE Build Service repository.

Ubuntu Translator Tools

Filed under
Software

glatzor.de: In which package can I translate this message/dialog? What is the difference between these two po files? How can I access the translation page of a package in a faster way compared to clicking through the whole website tree or manipulating the url? Where can I get the automatically updated language packs?

Canonical hopes Best Buy Ubuntu will spur Linux adoption

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica.com: Linux distributor Canonical is putting a price tag on packaged Ubuntu installation CDs and making them available for purchase on shelves in retail stores. The question, however, is whether the package delivers enough additional value to justify the cost. The answer, according to Canonical, is the ValuSoft startup support.

Is Ubuntu really easier? Is Pepsi really better than Coke?

Filed under
Ubuntu

jaysonrowe.wordpress: One thing that does irritate me is bickering between different camps in the Linux community. Each thinks that their distribution is the best, and should be used by every living, breathing and eating human being – ’nuff said. I really feel that this is a dangerous attitude, and I feel that this is an attitude that is going to continue to hurt Linux over all rather than help.

What is so good about Linux?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Whenever I have conversations with people about windows and Linux they always ask me what is so good about Linux. They see something that looks pretty and gives them a wow factor but it is not enough. I can talk about Linux's superior multitasking and hardware support or security against virus's and spyware and I get the gazed donut look in pretty short order.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.