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Saturday, 30 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Getting started with ParallelKnoppix, a live CD for clusters

Filed under
Linux

ParallelKnoppix is a modified Knoppix live CD designed for use in creating HPC clusters. You can start up PK on multiple nodes to run a cluster, and customize PK to add or remove applications.

What Does Free Software Really Cost?

Filed under
OSS

You've probably seen the many articles infesting computing publications that blather on about comparing TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) and ROI (Return on Investment) for Linux and Windows, and trying to figure out which one costs less to run. Let's set up a gnarly Linux vs. Windows DeathMatch Arena with two hypothetical admins - one for Linux, one for Windows.

Interview with Brian Brazil and Paul O'Malley of gNewSense

Filed under
Interviews

Irish Free Software developers Brian Brazil and Paul O'Malley have developed a new distribution, appropriately named gNewSense. Made with the philosophy of Debian and the structure of Ubuntu, it aims to be the freest distribution out there. Linux Online is grateful to Messrs. Brazil and O'Malley for taking time out of their busy schedules to answer a few questions about their project.

When Linux trumps Unix and vice versa

Filed under
Linux

According to recent studies, two thirds or more of IT organizations are considering a migration to Linux. But obviously any migration is no trivial matter. If your organization is thinking about migrating to Linux, plan to take a hard look at the realities before you get too far into the process.

Book review: Managing and Customizing OpenCMS 6 Websites

Filed under
Reviews

If you want to create a free software content management server fast and starting with zero knowledge, and then vigorously and systematically play with a Java based web application, then the book Managing and Customizing OpenCMS 6 by Matt Butcher is the accurate, project orientated and a pragmatic book that you are looking for.

Matt Asay: Open source and The Big Chill

Filed under
OSS

What if Oracle's and Microsoft's recent actions are not about competing with the present, but rather about competing with the future? By this I mean that perhaps both are attempts to choke investment into open source. As in The Terminator movies, perhaps it's a way to kill the future before it happens.

Getting My Kicks On Route 64

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Some months ago I started collecting the pieces I needed to build my own 64-bit computer. After the construction phase I was faced with the distro question: Which audio-optimized Linux distribution should I try ? The logical first choice was 64Studio, a pure 64-bit Debian-based distribution with patched kernel and a nice suite of native 64-bit sound and music applications.

First Issue of Amarok Weekly Newsletter Released

Filed under
Software

In the first issue of the Amarok Weekly Newsletter, we talk about Magnatune.com music store integration and security, search inside lyrics, a new GStreamer-based engine, support for user-definable labels and promotional activities. Enjoy!

Winners and losers in the New Linux World

Filed under
Linux

Would you have believed at the end of last summer that Microsoft and Novell would partner over Linux, or that Oracle would create its own brand of Linux? What does it all mean? I'm ready to give you my two-cents on who are the winners and losers in this post-deal Linux world.

Tip of the Trade: Simplifying Snort

Filed under
Software

Snort has truly grown up. Its fans watched it grow from a fairly simple, lightweight, yet effective, intrusion detector into a full-blown intrusion detector and preventer. Snort now runs on Windows and Mac OS X as well as Linux and Unix.

Open Source Turncoats Must Not Be Supported: boycottnovell.com online

Filed under
Web
SUSE

The way to communicate with a corporation is economically. It is unacceptable behavior on Novell’s part to legitimize and participate in MS FUD campaign, and to violate the very license that allows them to distribute the community’s work in the first place. I say let the big MS lump payment be their severance from the community.

And with these words, www.boycottnovell.com is born.

Microsoft May Indemnify Some Red Hat Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

While Microsoft is hoping to enter into a patent deal with Red Hat similar to the one it has with Novell, the software giant has not ruled out going it alone and providing some sort of indemnification for its customers who use Red Hat Linux.

Get top-quality scans from your scanner with Lprof

Filed under
HowTos

The key to getting first-rate image output on any operating system is setting up a good workflow. One piece of the workflow puzzle that used to be out of reach for Linux users is device profiling -- accurately measuring hardware devices like scanners and monitors to account for their differing capabilities. But a relatively young open source application called Lprof does a professional job at that task.

Blizzard banned all Linux users from WoW yesterday

Filed under
Web

"This account has been found to have employed third party software designed to automate many aspects of the World of Warcraft game play experience. Such software runs contrary to the essence of World of Warcraft and provides an advantage over other players."

Monitor your Linux computer with machine-generated music

Filed under
Linux

Use Perl and FluidSynth to create a real-time musical composition of your system status. Learn how to integrate various system monitoring data into a harmony-producing, MIDI-controlled audio synthesis. Explore audible information methods and configurations to help you monitor and manage your computing environment.

Linux Tricks - Keeping your Ubuntu/Debian machines clean

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HowTos

I tend to install a lot of stuff on my Ubuntu machines. Much of this I do for curiosity and then report it here. This means that not only do I get to check out lots of interesting stuff, but my machines also start getting cluttered with stale files, old versions and orphaned files.

Here are two quick ways to help clean up your system.

Bash Tricks: Numbering Lines

Filed under
HowTos

Now and then you want to number the lines of a file. You can roll your own script to do that:

Complete Story.

Christopher Blizzard: first olpc machine in cambridge

Filed under
Hardware

We received our first machine in the Cambridge today from the plant in Taiwan. This is one of the hand-assembled models running the browser in Sugar. There are some more pictures in the wiki! Even one where I look pretty grumpy.

Pix Here.

Step-by-Step IPP based Print Server using CUPS

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to install a Linux print server with CUPS. It also covers the installation and configuration of printer drivers on the print server as well as the printer setup on a Windows 2000 client.

Review: Sony's PS3 versus Nintendo's Wii

Filed under
Hardware

Nintendo Co. Ltd. and Sony Corp.'s next-generation game consoles are finally ready for play, and bring significant advances to the gaming world. We tested the $599 PS3 that features a 60GB drive and 802.11b/g wireless networking plus Memory Stick, SD Card, and CompactFlash media slots. The Wii (pronounced "we") costs $250 and builds in Wi-Fi (but not ethernet).

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