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Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The open source job market is booming srlinuxx 26/07/2013 - 2:22am
Story Wayland, Weston 1.2 Development Statistics srlinuxx 26/07/2013 - 2:21am
Story Linux shorts srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 8:39pm
Story Bloomberg TV: Most of Modern Society Running Linux srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 8:34pm
Story antiX 13.1 "Luddite" Review: Superb srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 8:31pm
Story What a life… KDE srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 6:20pm
Story Ubuntu 13.10 32-bit vs. 64-bit Performance srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 6:14pm
Story GNOME Multimedia tools updates srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 6:11pm
Story How Linux is taking over the network srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 6:01pm
Story Female dev's outburst against Torvalds was planned srlinuxx 25/07/2013 - 4:21pm

My distro is redder than yours, so ner!

Filed under
Linux

What is needed here is a celebrity distro match, battle to the death. And in the blue corner, weighing in at 70lbs, wearing knobbly knees and a tank top, master of the inane, lord or pointlessness, it's Faaaaaaaanboy! And in the orangy corner, weighing in at 71.123984775lbs, taking into account a floating point error, compiled 1 second faster, the spark of the unholy distro...'buntu basher masher.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 227

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Ubuntu Studio 7.10

  • News: Indiana controversies, Mandriva vs Microsoft, OpenBSD 4.2 interview, Debian
  • KDE4 live CD, Fedora 8 and PulseAudio, end of Trustix

  • Released last week: OpenBSD 4.2, openSUSE 10.3 "Live"
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 8
  • Donations: NimbleX receives €300
  • New additions: Indiana
  • New distributions: Arktur, gOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Connect Firefox to TiddlyWiki with TiddlySnip

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: If you're using TiddlyWiki as your note-taking tool, you ought to give TiddlySnip a try. The idea behind this Firefox extension is simple: it allows you to add the currently viewed Web page or selected text snippet to your TiddlyWiki as a new tiddler. But TiddlySnip adds a few clever twists to this basic idea, which turn the Firefox/TiddlyWiki combo into a powerful and extremely useful tool.

Also: Prism Prototype Now Available on Mac and Linux

Bye bye Gentoo

Filed under
Gentoo

roys web: I never thought I would write this, but it's true. I've retired from Gentoo. It's been a fun ride, This is not a snap decision, I have been thinking about it in the back of my mind for a few weeks now. Why am I leaving?

Also: That guy is such an *asshat* (and so are you).

An introduction to the visual features of GNU Screen

Filed under
HowTos

debian-administration: Many people here use GNU Screen, and I've not seen extensive coverage of the things you can do with the status-line in the past, so I thought a brief overview of a couple of visual settings wouldn't be amiss.

Future Flash Linux Ready for A Fight with MPAA

Filed under
Linux
  • Watching DVDs in Linux: A Fight with MPAA

  • The Future of Flash in Linux
  • Linux Ready for Prime Time Desktop

A tale of two plug-and-play Linux boxes

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: As many of us who watch the Linux market know, the past week has seen the announcement of two markedly different plug-and-play Linux computers. I was excited by one and not the other. To my surprise, the one that didn't interest me has taken off like a rocket to the moon while it is still too early say how the other will do. The good news, however, is that desktop Linux has finally gone mainstream.

Monitor your drives to extend their life

Filed under
HowTos

tectonic: The problem is that modern laptops often have very aggressive power setups by default to, theoretically, guard against damage and reduce power consumption. But in doing so they may cause your disk drive to load/unload at more regular intervals than is reasonable.

Clearlooks Compact Gnome Theme

Filed under
Software

martin.ankerl.com: I have been using Ubuntu for quite a while now, but one thing I really dislike is that all the themes are huge space wasters compared to Windows XP. This finally got me angry enough to create a customized version of the Clearlooks theme.

Also: Update to Awn weather applet

Running FreeNX using a Mandriva 2008 Server

Filed under
HowTos

linux-tip.net: NoMachine NX is a Terminal Server and remote access solution based on a comprising set of enterprise class open source technologies. NX makes it possible to run any graphical application on any operating system across any network connection at incredible speed.

ubuntu, ubuntu, ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 10 Things Ubuntu Needs To Improve On

  • Ubuntu Gutsy With ExpressCard - Working Options
  • Ubuntu 7.10: Inflection Point or Tipping Point?
  • Weekly News #64
  • Linc Caves
  • Ubuntu Search Engine
  • Ubuntu Gutsy - there's something different about this one

Linux device driver drama: Who will deliver support, code sharing?

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Device drivers can make or break an operating system. The best engineered kernel is useless if applications running on it cannot interface with the outside world or if device manufacturers cannot readily support it with their wares.

I, Robot: The Man Behind the Google Phone

Filed under
Google

nytimes: If the effort succeeds, it will be the most drastic challenge to date of the assertion by Microsoft — the godfather of the desktop PC — that Google and other members of the so-called open-source world can imitate but not innovate.

Power-ups for Firefox: Add-ons bring added security and comfort

Filed under
Moz/FF

bangkok post: Firefox is known as the quintessential free browser. Users can not only download it free of charge, they can also expand its abilities in almost unlimited ways. A dedicated developer community makes this possible by programming and updating special extensions called add-ons.

How badly is CentOS hurting Red Hat?

Filed under
Linux

interopnews.com: Why does Red Hat tolerate CentOS? The Community ENTerprise Operating System is an identical binary clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (minus the trademarks), compiled from the source code RPMs that Red Hat conveniently provides on its FTP site. It is also completely free, as in beer.

Bumps on the Road to Document Exchange Nirvana

eWeeks blogs: At the heart of the rift between the Foundation and the rest of the ODF backers--led by Sun and IBM--lies a dispute over the proper strategy for achieving round-trip document fidelity between Microsoft Office and ODF-consuming applications, such as Sun's OpenOffice.org or IBM's Lotus Symphony.

KAlarm

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Remembering things. It’s something that a lot of us aren’t all that good at, without having something to trigger us. KAlarm is an application which is designed to allow you to set certain things to happen at certain times.

Archlinux tools: AUR

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: You already know Pacman, the Archlinux software manager. Now it’s time to meet AUR and yaourt, the extra tools that can bring a fistful of apps on your desktop within just a few console commands.

The Road to Ubuntu - Backup Salvation

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire: After several weeks of anguish I've finally recreated my Windows XP file backup regime under Gutsy Gibbon, overcoming my fear of the Linux command line in the process.

Review: openSuSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

anurag.acespace.co.uk: Although I wasn't the first one to download the latest version of openSuSE, I was still one of the first to do so, believe me. SuSE was the first Linux distribution that I used to fix my roots in the Linux world. So, I've an attachment with this flavor of Linux in particular. But I won't be partial in this review, not even a bit. I'll present my review on Novell's openSuSE 10.3 in an easy-to-understand manner, that is, topic-wise:

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Atom Installer
    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage. In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.
  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More
    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More
    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution. Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • IOTA: IoT revolutionized with a Ledger
    Ever since the introduction of digital money, the world quickly came to realize how dire and expensive the consequences of centralized systems are. Not only are these systems incredibly expensive to maintain, they are also “single points of failures” which expose a large number of users to unexpected service interruptions, fraudulent activities and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious hackers. Thanks to Blockchain, which was first introduced through Bitcoin in 2009, the clear benefits of a decentralized and “trustless” transactional settlement system became apparent. No longer should expensive trusted third parties be used for handling transactions, instead, the flow of money should be handled in a direct, Peer-to-Peer fashion. This concept of a Blockchain (or more broadly, a distributed ledger) has since then become a global phenomenon attracting billions of dollars in investments to further develop the concept.
  • Return Home and Unify: My Case for Unity 8
  • Can netbooks be cool again?
    Earlier this week, my colleague Chaim Gartenberg covered a laptop called the GPD Pocket, which is currently being funded on Indiegogo. As Chaim pointed out, the Pocket’s main advantage is its size — with a 7-inch screen, the thing is really, really small — and its price, a reasonable $399. But he didn’t mention that the Pocket is the resurrection of one of the most compelling, yet fatally flawed, computing trends of the ‘00s: the netbook. So after ten years, are netbooks finally cool again? That might be putting it too strongly, but I’m willing to hope.

Linux Devices

  • Compact, rugged module runs Linux or Android on Apollo Lake
    Ubiqcomm’s 95 x 95mm, Apollo Lake-based “COM-AL6C” COM offers 4K video along with multiple SATA, USB, GbE, and PCIe interfaces, plus -40 to 85°C operation. Ubiqconn Technology Inc. has announced a “COM-AL6C” COM Express Type 6 Compact form factor computer-on-module built around Intel’s Apollo Lake processors and designed to withstand the rigors of both fixed and mobile industrial applications. The module offers a choice among three Intel Apollo Lake processors: the quad-core Atom x5-E3930, quad-core x5-E3940, and dual-core x7-E3950, which are clocked at up to 2.0GHz burst and offer TDPs from 6.5 to 12 Watts.
  • Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266
    To get started with IoT (the Internet of Things), your device needs, well, an Internet connection. Base Arduino microcontrollers don't have Internet connectivity by default, so you either need to add Ethernet, Wi-Fi shields, or adapters to them, or buy an Arduino that has built-in Internet connectivity. In addition to complexity, both approaches add cost and consume the already-precious Arduino flash RAM for program space, which limits what you can do. Another approach is to use a Raspberry Pi or similar single-board computer that runs a full-blown operating system like Linux. The Raspberry Pi is a solid choice in many IoT use cases, but it is often overkill when all you really want to do is read a sensor and send the reading up to a server in the cloud. Not only does the Raspberry Pi potentially drive up the costs, complexity, and power consumption of your project, but it is running a full operating system that needs to be patched, and it has a much larger attack surface than a simple microcontroller. When it comes to IoT devices and security, simpler is better, so you can spend more time making and less time patching what you already made.
  • Blinkenlights!
  • Blinkenlights, part 2
  • Blinkenlights, part 3
  • [Older] Shmoocon 2017: The Ins And Outs Of Manufacturing And Selling Hardware
    Every day, we see people building things. Sometimes, useful things. Very rarely, this thing becomes a product, but even then we don’t hear much about the ins and outs of manufacturing a bunch of these things or the economics of actually selling them. This past weekend at Shmoocon, [Conor Patrick] gave the crowd the inside scoop on selling a few hundred two factor authentication tokens. What started as a hobby is now a legitimate business, thanks to good engineering and abusing Amazon’s distribution program.
  • 1.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users NEVER use a PC, 200 Million PC Internet Users never use a mobile phone. Understanding the 3.5 Billion Internet Total Audience
    As I am working to finish the 2017 Edition of the TomiAhonen Almanac (last days now) I always get into various updates of numbers, that remind me 'I gotta tell this story'.. For example the internet user numbers. We have the December count by the ITU for year 2016, that says the world has now 3.5 Billion internet users in total (up from 3.2 Billion at the end of year 2015). So its no 'drama' to know what is 'that' number. The number of current internet total users is yes, 3.5 Billion, almost half of the planet's total population (47%).