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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Jono Bacon: Five Years At Canonical srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 9:15pm
Story Sapphire Pure Platinum A75 srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 9:13pm
Story In Defense of Negativity srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 7:07pm
Story Manage Your Photo Library With F-Spot Photo Manager srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 7:04pm
Story Introducing The amazing GPS (Gimp Paint Studio) srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 7:02pm
Story Early look on Ubuntu Friendly srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 5:14pm
Story More GNOME 3 inanity srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 5:07pm
Story more on Active strategy srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 5:02pm
Story A Mageia Rant srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 4:57pm
Story Taking the risk out of open source srlinuxx 05/09/2011 - 4:54pm

tux500: Where are we now?

Filed under
Linux

Well, hasn't this been an interesting week. To say that the Linux Community lacks passion is akin to saying Van Gogh didn't like stars. In any event, and regardless of your personal feelings about the Tux500 project or mainstream advertising for Linux, most of the people we talk to agree.

AMD 8.36.5 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

Last month the AMD Catalyst Control Center Linux Edition had entered the world with mixed opinions by the ATI/AMD Linux user community. In our 8.35.5 Linux driver review we had looked at the Linux version of the Catalyst Control Center quite extensively. This new control center replaced the old fireglcontrolpanel and in our opinion was a huge move for AMD.

Debian: some people just don't get it

Filed under
Linux

It was interesting to see the comments which Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols made about the Debian project recently. Interesting, because they resulted in a rejoinder from a Debian developer, Thaddeus Black - not a particularly prominent person in the project, not the leader.

CentOS 5 is a solid enterprise OS

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Last week, two years since its last major release, the CentOS project released version 5 of its enterprise-focused Linux distribution. I downloaded it and put it to the test, and found that CentOS 5 has maintained its tradition of robustness and reliability while adding new features like virtualization.

Oxygen usability icon survey

Filed under
KDE

The nice guys at OpenUsability have prepared a fantastic icon survey.

This survey will help KDE’s usability experts to point us which icons we should change or improve and which are already good. Thanks very much o everybody which will enter the survey.

PS: it doesn’t take very long, and there are no hard questions.

Tip of the Trade: GParted

Filed under
HowTos

Most Linux system administrators are familiar with GParted, the excellent open source graphical disk-partitioning tool. GParted outshines all graphical disk-partioners, including its commercial competitors. With GParted, you can create, destroy, resize, move, and copy partitions on all the major filesystems, including ext2/3, NTFS, fat16/32, Reiser3/4, XFS, JFS, and several more.

GPLv3: Free or Commercial?

Filed under
OSS

When I think about technology companies that are major backers of the open source movement, I tend to think about Google and IBM.

The two companies publicly support open source efforts and both have built products that take advantage of open source software. Yet Google and IBM tend to prefer open source licenses other than GPL.

Why is that?

Open source needs lobbyists

Filed under
OSS

A decade ago, when the Web had just been spun, the computer industry learned the hard way how it needed lobbyists to keep competition alive.

Chief among these companies was Microsoft, which stepped up to the plate for the industry, hired lots of warm bodies (often with fine minds) and fought even the mighty telephone industry to a draw.

Red Hat Teams with UNC to Bring Open Source Philosophy to Campus

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT - News), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that the company would work with the University of North Carolina system and the North Carolina Research Campus to advance the adoption of open source philosophies of standards and collaboration in biotechnology, bioinformatics, public policy and healthcare research.

Tux 500: A Race To Nowhere

Filed under
Linux

Eight days into this donation race Tux 500 is reporting they have collected just under $5,500 of the $350,000 goal for the race. At the time of the race, I will be utterly shocked if they collect more than $50,000.

At $25,000 Linux would only be an associate car sponsor. While this is a nice original idea, I personally see Tux 500 becoming a flop.

Vietnam gives priority to open source software

Filed under
OSS

The government has approved the software industry development programme to 2010, in which priority will be given to the use of open source software in state-funded IT projects.

The state will encourage and assist organisations and businesses in providing services supporting the use of open source software, curbing the rate of intellectual property violations of software.

GnuCash financial-accounting software in Debian

Filed under
HowTos

GnuCash is personal and small-business financial-accounting software, freely licensed under the GNU GPL and available for GNU/Linux, *BSD, Solaris

Create "chroot jail" for bind

Filed under
HowTos

This article will explain how to create a chroot jail for bind8. This effectively makes bind oblivious to the rest of the (file)system beyond it's chroot directory tree. Therefore security will be increased, because if bind due to some crack attempt allows shell access one can not go beyond the chroot environment.

(Quoting bind howto):

How to secure WebDAV with SSL and Two-Factor Authentication

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This guide documents how to configure a WebDAV resource using SSL and two-factor authentication and how to access that resource from Windows, Linux and Mac.

Stable GIMP 2.2.14 Released

Filed under
Software

Version 2.2.14 of the GNU Image Manipulation Program is a bug-fix release in the stable 2.2 series. Please see the NEWS file for a detailed list of changes. The source code is available from ftp.gimp.org. Binary packages for the various supported platforms should become available soon.

Bugs fixed in GIMP 2.2.14:
=========================

Kids In Jiri Love XO!

Filed under
OLPC

Shankar and Ankur of OLPC Nepal were invited and sponsored by nepa~laya to attend the festival to show the XO to school children and also teachers from some of the schools in the area.

Progress toward Linux on the desktop

Filed under
Linux

Is Linux on the desktop in your future? Momentum in the enterprise is slowly building for “the march of the penguin.” (Please forgive me...I love puns!)

Kernel space: Linux runs into a scalability problem

Filed under
Linux

Part of the fun of working with truly large machines is that one gets to discover new scalability surprises before anybody else. So the SGI folks often have more fun than many of the rest of us. Their latest discovery has to do with the number of kernel threads which, on a 4096-processor system, leads to some interesting kernel behavior.

Compiling a hassle? Not any more.

Filed under
Software

Most linux distributions provide thousands of packages for our computing fun. Somehow they always seem to miss one or two packages that we just have to have. Either that or the package they do provide has, for one reason or none, missing functionality. Sometimes the packages are just plain broken.

Review: DesktopBSD 1.6 RC2

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

After a nice weekend away in Hilton Head, SC, enjoying the nice sun and the company of family and friends, I am back with another review of a BSD-based system. DesktopBSD 1.6 RC2, released April 13, aims to provide a system that is easy to use but maintains the power and functionality of BSD.

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More in Tux Machines

Open Source: Of the people, for the people, by the people

Open Source is the best option for e-Governance. Its open nature allows constant improvements from the open source community, and when built in the correct method using firewalls, the security is protected as well. The best part of the open source for Governments is that the overall cost of building these solutions are much less than other frameworks as it is built, improved, and maintained by a strongly, connect open source community. Truly… ‘of the people, by the people and for the people’. Read more

Uganda's Move to Free/Open Source Software

  • Uganda: Govt to Cut Costs With Open Source Software
    The private sector and government departments have been urged to adopt Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) to increase their efficiency and competitiveness, writes ALI TWAHA. FOSS is software with source code that anyone can inspect, modify, and enhance to suit their needs, something that is not possible with commercial software currently being used in most government departments. Speaking during the seventh African conference on FOSS at Speke Resort hotel in Munyoyo, ICT minister Frank Tumwebaze said government departments will gradually integrate the use of FOSS to reduce the cost of public service delivery. "Presently, government has been spending over $40m (Shs132bn) annually on commercial software from the like of Oracle systems and Microsoft Cooperation. [Using] FOSS will result into enormous savings that can be re-injected into other under-funded areas," Tumwebaze said.
  • Uganda: New Software Policy to Boost Innovation in Offing
    A Science, Technology and Innovations driven economy may soon be a reality in Uganda if Cabinet approves a free and open software being developed. Speaking at the 7th Africa Conference on Open Source Software at the Commonwealth Resort in Munyonyo on Monday, Mr James Saaka, the executive director of National Information and Technology Authority Uganda, said there is a lot of registered software being used but is very costly. He said globally, people develop Free Open Source Software (Foss) which Uganda would emulate for national development. Mr Saaka said the country is in the initial stages to develop Foss, adding that the software can spur investment in research and development. "We see that the Proprietary software is still expensive and if we are going to develop more online services, we can't afford but use alternative means to develop our e-government service," Mr Saaka said. He also added that in Uganda, there is an advent of talent skilled in Foss and can help in innovations.

Linux Turns 25 Exactly Today. More LinuxCon and Anniversary Coverage. Plus Microsoft Interjection PR.

Red Hat Virtualization 4

  • Red Hat’s gunning for VMware with virtualization platform update
    Open-source Linux vendor Red Hat Inc. has thrown in support for OpenStack Neutron and other new technologies with the latest release of its software virtualization package, in what looks like a bid to steal customers away from VMware Inc.’s more widely-used solution. Targeted at convergence, Red Hat Virtualization 4 is the first version of the platform that doesn’t include the word “enterprise,” in a move that suggests the company is hoping its virtualized stack will become the platform for convergence, rather than a server density product. OpenStack Neutron is the open-source networking project used by Software-Defined Networks (SDNs), which up until now has only been available as a preview. Many have criticized Neutron’s development for lagging behind the rest of OpenStack’s code base, and Red Hat was one of several vendors to concede that things could be sped up a bit. With the inclusion of the software in Red Hat Virtualization, the company says its Linux platform can be used to run both cloud-enabled and “traditional” workloads in concert.
  • Red Hat Virtualization 4 woos VMware faithful
    It's easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn't forgotten about you. RHV (Red Hat Virtualization) 4.0, released today, refreshes Red Hat's open source virtualization platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat's product line. It's a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat's virtualization efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company's intention to woo VMware customers.