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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story PostgreSQL, the NoSQL Database Roy Schestowitz 30/01/2015 - 9:30am
Story Seeing the cloud through Ubuntu-colored glasses Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2015 - 9:28am
Story Bill Gates Inadvertently Shows Off Ubuntu on His Facebook Page Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2015 - 9:20am
Story Major Release LibreOffice 4.4 Announced Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2015 - 9:11am
Story Sphinx: An outstanding open source documentation platform Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2015 - 9:06am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/01/2015 - 2:23am
Story BackBox Linux 4.1 released! Roy Schestowitz 30/01/2015 - 2:18am
Story Tough multi-display controller runs Linux on i.MX6 Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2015 - 12:47am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 30/01/2015 - 12:41am
Story Libreboot X200 laptop now FSF-certified to respect your freedom Rianne Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 11:22pm

Installing Linux software 101 for Windows users

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blogs.computerworld: Lately, I've seen several articles by Windows users grumbling about how hard it is to install software on Linux. It is? You could have fooled me. Still, people are having trouble, so here's my 101 class on installing programs on Linux.

23 Useful System Applications for Linux

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Software It’s always great to have Linux Alternatives to popular applications so I’ve decided to write about some of the most useful System applications for Linux including Cd burners, Aniti Virus, FTP solutions and instant messengers that you can download today.

6 Great Apps to Analyze Your Disk Usage in Linux

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Software You may own a one terabyte hard disk, but the screen still shows an “Your disk is full” error message whenever you want to install a new application. Does this sound familiar to you?

Behind the scenes in Microsoft's war against Linux

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Microsoft Even as Microsoft has slipped into the mainstream of open source by embedding it in its products and adopting open-source strategies for services such as customer relationship management, it continues its subversive fight against Linux.

Also: About That Microsoft 'Open Source' Job Opening

Preview: Three Trends At Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE)

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Linux As the Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE) prepares to kick-off February 20 in Los Angeles, The VAR Guy did some preliminary poking around. He wanted to see if there were any key trends worth noting.

How do you beat free?

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blog.ibeentoubuntu: Linux activists state that the dropping cost of computers will force Microsoft into a corner and it will be unable to compete with low-cost alternatives on either the MS Office or the MS Windows front. Hardware with a Linux distro is often either more expensive or the same price as hardware with MS Windows. Why is that?

Krita 2.0: a Host of New Features

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Software Boudewijn Rempt has summarised results of development for the next version of Krita, the painting and image editing application for KOffice. Krita 2.0 will contain a host of new features, some of which are unique in the free software world. Below Piotr introduces some of the new features which will be available in this release.

SimplyMEPIS 8.0 RC3: Entering the "Waiting for Lenny" Phase

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Linux MEPIS has distributed ISO files for RC3 of SimplyMEPIS 8.0. For RC3, the kernel has been updated to upstream version, Qemu 0.9.1+svn, libvirt 0.6., virt-manager 0.6.1, and virtinst 0.400.1 are available from the MEPIS pool to better match the virtualization configuration of the MEPIS kernel.

What’s new with Lenny

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Linux Lenny’s long awaited target release date is just around the corner. Many in the Debian community have been using Lenny for some time now as testing but there is a lot of people out there who haven’t upgraded yet. For those getting ready to make the switch and for those who just haven’t really looked in to it, I have decided to list some of the key changes.

Bruce Perens: Combining GPL and Proprietary Software

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OSS Linux is a natural for embedded systems. That's why it's popping up in more cell phones, often without the customer even realizing it's there. But cell phone manufacturers, and the broader sector of embedded systems, must cope with the problem of how to combine the GPL Linux kernel, and software that isn't Open Source. How does one do that legally?

Minimalist Distributions

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jdeeth.blogspot: Old computers are less than a dime a dozen—-literally. I pick them up for free. So some local geek like me comes along and turns it into a Linux box. But how far can you push that? How little computer does it take to run a modern, GUI operating system?

The Kindle is a Swindle

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Hardware Amazon's Kindle v2 officially arrived today, and it's a swindle. I have no argument with the item itself, but $400 is a lot of dough to pay for a gadget that will sit gathering dust a couple of weeks after you've purchased it. Amazon customers are already up in arms--and they're right.

Richard Stallman: Up close and impersonal

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brucebyfield.wordpress: When Richard Stallman spoke the other night at the Maritime Labour Centre in Vancouver, I wasn’t going to see what he is really like, or to hear his arguments. I went to see his public persona, and to observe how other people reacted to it.

The incredible shrinking operating system

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OS Windows, Mac OS, and Linux are all getting smaller. What does that mean for you?

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 289

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Preview: Moblin V2 Core Alpha

  • News: From Puppy to Woof, Mandriva Assembly, BSD distros in freeze, Fedora FAQ updates, Slackware package finder, interviews with developers from Xfce and KDE
  • Released last week: Linux Mint 6 "x86_64", StartCom Enterprise Linux 5.0.3
  • Upcoming releases: Mandriva Linux 2009.1 Beta 2, Frugalware Linux 1.0rc1
  • New additions: Ojuba
  • New distributions: PocketPC
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

What can Linux do for you?

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Linux As the Linux name has been filtering down from the dizzying heights of geekdom to the general mind share. I am sure that many people have been wondering exactly what this Linux thing is and what can it do for them.

Awn Window Navigator

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Is Ubuntu Heading Down the Microsoft Release Path?

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Ubuntu This thought hit home when I was working to fix a sound issue on my computer, although the seeds had been sown quite some time ago with my upgrade to Ubuntu 7.04. My concern is not about FOSS philosophy, but rather about updates and version releases.

Compiz community shakeup could bring big improvements

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Software The development community behind the open source Compiz window manager is undergoing a major reorganization effort that will converge disparate branches of the project and help it overcome its recent lack of direction.

Debian Project seeks Hardware Donations

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Hardware The Debian project is looking for sponsors for two new official services: snapshot and data archives. Both services utilize large amounts of data and therefore require a capable machine with a large disk array that provides 10 TB of disk space to start, with the ability to be easily extended. We'd like interested sponsors to contact

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More in Tux Machines

Debian: Turris Omnia With Debian, ClojureSYNC, Debconf 2018

  • Using the switch on Turris Omnia with Debian
    After installing Debian on Turris Omnia there are a few more steps needed to make use of the network switch. The Armada 385 CPU provides three network interfaces. Two are connected to the switch (but only one of them is used to "talk" to the switch), and one is routed directly to the WAN port.
  • ClojureSYNC Talk Resources
  • Debconf 2018, MATE 1.2.0, libqalculate transition etc
    First up is news on Debconf 2018 which will be held in Hsinchu, Taiwan. Apparently, the CFP or Call for Proposals was made just a few days ago and I probably forgot to share about it. Registration has also been opened now. The only thing most people have to figure out is how to get a system-generated certificate, make sure to have an expiry date, I usually have a year, make it at least 6 months as you would need to put up your proposal for contention and let the content-team decide it on the proposal merit. This may at some point move from alioth to salsa as the alioth service is going away. The best advice I can give is to put your proposal in and keep reworking/polishing it till the end date for applications is near. At the same time do not over commit yourself. From a very Indian perspective and somebody who has been to one debconf, you can think of the debconf as a kind of ‘khumb‘ Mela or gathering as you will. You can definitely network with all the topics and people you care for, but the most rewarding are those talks which were totally unplanned for. Also it does get crazy sometime so it’s nice if you are able to have some sane time for yourself even if it just a 5-10 minute walk.

Mozilla: Facebook-Mozilla Rift, MDN, No More Notifications (If You Want)

  • Mozilla stops Facebook advertising, demands privacy changes
    It’s probably not top of Mark Zuckerberg’s worry list this week but Mozilla Corporation, developer of the Firefox browser, is officially unhappy with Facebook.
  • Results of the MDN “Competitive Content Analysis” SEO experiment
    The next SEO experiment I’d like to discuss results for is the MDN “Competitive Content Analysis” experiment. In this experiment, performed through December into early January, involved selecting two of the top search terms that resulted in MDN being included in search results—one of them where MDN is highly-placed but not at #1, and one where MDN is listed far down in the search results despite having good content available. The result is a comparison of the quality of our content and our SEO against other sites that document these technology areas. With that information in hand, we can look at the competition’s content and make decisions as to what changes to make to MDN to help bring us up in the search rankings.
  • No More Notifications (If You Want)
    Online, your attention is priceless. That’s why every site in the universe wants permission to send you notifications about new stuff. It can be distracting at best and annoying at worst. The latest version of Firefox for desktop lets you block those requests and many others.

EUPL planned actions

A revised set of guidelines and recommendations on the use of the open source licence EUPL v1.2 published by the Commission on 19 May 2017 will be developed, involving the DIGIT unit B.3 (Reusable Solutions) and the JRC 1.4 (Joint Research Centre – Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer). The existing licence wizard will be updated. New ways of promoting public administrations' use of open source will be investigated and planned (such as hackathons or app challenges on open source software). The target date for the release of this set of guidelines on the use of the European Public Licence EUPL v1.2, including a modified Licence Wizard, is planned Q2 2018. Read more

Security: Dropbox, FUD, CNCF, 'Cloud'

  • Dropbox has some genuinely great security reporting guidelines, but reserves the right to jail you if you disagree

    Dropbox's position, however reasonable in many of its aspects, is woefully deficient, because the company reserves the right to invoke DMCA 1201 and/or CFAA and other tools that give companies the power to choose who can say true things abour mistakes they've made.

    This is not normal. Before DRM in embedded software and cloud connectivity, became routine there were no restrictions on who could utter true words about defects in a product. [...]

  • Hackers Infect Linux Servers With Monero Miner via 5-Year-Old Vulnerability [Ed: A five-year-old vulnerability implies total neglect by sysadmins, not a GNU/Linux weakness]
    Attackers also modified the local cron jobs to trigger a "watchd0g" Bash script every three minutes, a script that checked to see if the Monero miner was still active and restarted XMRig's process whenever it was down.
  • GitHub: Our dependency scan has found four million security flaws in public repos [Ed: No, GitHub just ran a scan for old versions being used and reused. It cannot do this for proprietary software, but the issues are there and the risks are no better.]
    GitHub says its security scan for old vulnerabilities in JavaScript and Ruby libraries has turned up over four million bugs and sparked a major clean-up by project owners. The massive bug-find total was reached within a month of the initiative's launch in November, when GitHub began scanning for known vulnerabilities in certain popular open-source libraries and notifying project owners that they should be using an updated version.
  • Envoy CNCF Project Completes Security Audit, Delivers New Release
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has begun a process of performing third-party security audits for its projects, with the first completed audit coming from the Envoy proxy project. The Envoy proxy project was created by ride-sharing company Lyft and officially joined the CNCF in September 2017. Envoy is a service mesh reverse proxy technology that is used to help scale micro-services data traffic.
  • Hybrid cloud security: Emerging lessons [Ed: 'Cloud' and security do not belong in the same headline because 'cloud' is a data breach, typically involving a company giving all its (and customers') data to some spying giant abroad]