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Saturday, 18 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Only FOSSers ‘Get’ FOSS Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:00am
Story From next release onwards, Debian is tied to systemd Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 8:45am
Story Ubuntu to Get Native HTML5 Streaming Through Google Chrome Soon Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 8:28am
Story Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 2:05am
Story Android One: Let us fill you in on Google’s big game Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 1:57am
Story Mesa Gets Closer To Having OpenGL 4.0 Tessellation Support Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 1:49am
Story Small Console Menu Utilities Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 1:34am
Story Samsung ship SM-Z130H budget Tizen Smartphones to India for R&D Purposes Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 1:26am
Story Fresh software from the 3.14 menu Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 1:09am
Story Florida is back on the Map for Linux and Open Source conventions with FOSSETCON 2 Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 1:03am

Firefox download extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: Download management is one of the larger categories on the Firefox Add-ons site, but while hundreds of extensions fall under this category, they are a mixed lot at best. However, with patience, you can find some programs worth exploring -- and even a few small treasures -- in this category.

Trendnet: "We support Linux...not really"

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntulinuxtipstricks.blogspot: Even when the box claims Linux compatibility, beware. Seriously, they need to be more specific. When it says Linux is supported, they mean strictly that the hardware supports Linux.

Vista vs XP vs Linux - my three-month test

Filed under
OS

darrenyates.com.au: Sam Varghese over at ITwire.com has sent a few cats amongst the pigeons with a post asking the question “Is Windows Vista really driving people to Linux?” To try and get a grip on how Windows XP vs Windows Vista vs Linux plays out, I’ve been playing with three computers for the last three months.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #107

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #107 for the week of August 31st - September 7th, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Intrepid Alpha 5 released, KDE 4.1.1 available for Kubuntu 8.04, Wanted: Moderators for Ubuntu Brainstorm, and Say Ubuntu!

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • How To: Play WMA Lossless Files On Your Linux Box

  • How to Update Twitter Using Pidgin on Linux
  • Playing Quake II under Linux — MultiPlayer
  • How to find the largest files or directories in Linux
  • Songbird 0.7.0, finally a functional player for linux
  • Weekend Project: Boxee, Part 2
  • What is missing from Linux?
  • most addictive linux game
  • Determining Maximum Pool Sets Using Binomial Coefficients On Linux
  • Is Linux EVER going to make it to the desktop?
  • The Woe of Linux Graphic Acceleration
  • Analysis: Chrome versus Firefox and Internet Explorer

Avoid the Managed Extensibility Framework

Filed under
OSS

Miguel de Icaza: As a .NET developer, you should avoid using the newly released Managed Extensibility Framework as its license prevents its use beyond the Windows platform. This will prevent your .NET software from running on Linux or MacOS in the future.

The Caldera v. Microsoft Docket - All the Documents To Be Found

Filed under
Legal

groklaw.net: Here are all the documents still electronically available from the court in the Caldera v. Microsoft litigation, which settled in 2000. Very little is available any more, mainly orders, but you can learn quite a bit from reading orders. And the docket sheet itself tells quite a tale. What I could get, I've placed as links in the list.

ZoooS takes OpenOffice.org, other desktop apps to Web

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com.au: When asked if and how they plan to match Microsoft Office's unparalleled feature set, most online office suite vendors simply switch the subject, touting the superiority of their Web-based collaboration, and low or free price. ZoooS is one of the few vendors that won't dodge the question.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Getting desktop effects working in Compiz/Emerald

  • MHT support in Firefox
  • Using Flashcam on Ubuntu
  • Developing/Installing OpenGL in Ubuntu
  • Clearing BASH Command History

America's Army Returning To Linux?

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Do you remember the days when we had America's Army for Linux? The first-person shooter game sponsored by the US government and uses Epic's Unreal Engine while being distributed freely? Well, it could come back to Linux!

KDE 4.1 Gentoo Ebuilds

Filed under
KDE
Gentoo

blog.cryos.net: So there have been quite a few people asking what is happening with KDE 4.1 on Gentoo. I have been working with a few other developers and interested users on the new ebuilds in an overlay. I think these ebuilds are almost ready and I am very eager to get them into the tree.

Crystal Ball Sunday #11: Linux Gets a Makeover

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: This week my crystal ball tells me that Linux is due for a major makeover and not just another pretty theme: A real makeover. It's time for Linux developers to stop following the Windows and Mac Desktop deveopers and get creative on their own.

C vs Python: Speed

Filed under
Software

theunixgeek.blogspot: Python is a very popular interpreted scripting language. C is a very popular compiled language. Due to its compiled nature, C is generally faster than Python, but is lower-level, making Python programming quicker and easier than C programming.

The Next Paradigm Shift: Open Source Everything

brighthand.com: In the past year, open source software and development models have come to the forefront of mobile computing. The shift isn't just a move to mobile devices, but a move to a different way of doing business with computing. And this one is more profound than just simply cloud computing or moof-ing.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Gentoo: Spellchecking in GTK Applications

  • Virus scanning with F-Secure Rescue CD 3.00
  • How To Change File Type Associations
  • Extract tarballs in Ubuntu
  • Getting wireless to work in Ubuntu on a Lenovo ThinkPad X200
  • #ubuntu Q and A Vol.1 - Hardware
  • 10G database on Ubuntu 8.04
  • How to setup Boot Password (Grub)
  • Unix 101: Manipulating files - Copying, moving, deleting
  • wl wireless driver in Intrepid
  • nvidia geforce fx5500 on Ubuntu 8.04.1

5 reasons to upgrade from Windows Vista to Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Windows Vista has been out for almost two years now but it still suffers from stability and compatibility issues, let alone an insatiable desire for beefier hardware. You don't have to live with it; here are five reasons why Linux makes a better choice for your computer.

opensuse-tutorials is up online

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: There are fedora-tutorials, ubuntu-futorials website on the web, for anyone who envies, of course, we have opensuse-tutorials either.

Best GNU/Linux Desktops Of 2008

Filed under
Linux

cyber-geeks.net: Here i have got some awesome desktop views of various linux editions. So i thought it would be a better idea to publish all these under the title "Best GNU/linux desktops of 2008."

OpenSUSE Linux 11.0, MacOS X Leopard, and Windows Vista

Filed under
OS

suseblog.com: I thought I’d take on the challenge of doing a triple-boot setup on my laptop. Windows Vista, MacOS X Leopard, and OpenSUSE 11.0 all on the same non-Mac machine. A machine much like my Dell Inspiron E1705.

Interview: JOLIE and Service-Oriented Computing Explained

Filed under
Interviews

dot.kde.org: During Akademy 2008, we sat down with Fabrizio Montesi who's working on JOLIE integration in KDE (and Plasma in particular). He explained the mechanics of the technology and what it can do for KDE.

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More in Tux Machines

Open Linux – Beyond distributions, regressions and rivalry

I love Linux. Which is why, whenever there’s a new distro release and it’s less than optimal (read, horrible), a unicorn dies somewhere. And since unicorns are pretty much mythical, it tells you how bad the situation is. On a more serious note, I’ve started my autumn crop of distro testing, and the results are rather discouraging. Worse than just bad results, we get inconsistent results. This is possibly even worse than having a product that works badly. The wild emotional seesaw of love-hate, hope-despair plays havoc with users and their loyalty. Looking back to similar tests in previous years, it’s as if nothing has changed. We’re spinning. Literally. Distro releases happen in a sort of intellectual vacuum, isolated from one another, with little to no cross-cooperation or cohesion. This got me thinking. Are there any mechanisms that could help strengthen partnership among different distro teams, so that our desktops looks and behave with more quality and consistency? Read more

Today in Techrights

Security: PeopleSoft, DJI, IoT, Amazon, Microsoft, ​Google, Ad Blocking and Codewarz

  • Oracle rushes out 5 patches for huge vulnerabilities in PeopleSoft app server
    Oracle issued a set of urgent security fixes on Tuesday that repair vulnerabilities revealed today by researchers from the managed security provider ERPScan at the DeepSec security conference in Vienna, Austria. The five vulnerabilities include one dubbed "JoltandBleed" by the researchers because of its similarity to the HeartBleed vulnerability discovered in OpenSSL in 2014. JoltandBleed is a serious vulnerability that could expose entire business applications running on PeopleSoft platforms accessible from the public Internet. The products affected include Oracle PeopleSoft Campus Solutions, Human Capital Management, Financial Management, and Supply Chain Management, as well as any other product using the Tuxedo 2 application server. According to recent research by ERPScan, more than 1,000 enterprises have their PeopleSoft systems exposed to the Internet, including a number of universities that use PeopleSoft Campus Solutions to manage student data.
  • Man gets threats—not bug bounty—after finding DJI customer data in public view
    DJI, the Chinese company that manufactures the popular Phantom brand of consumer quadcopter drones, was informed in September that developers had left the private keys for both the "wildcard" certificate for all the company's Web domains and the keys to cloud storage accounts on Amazon Web Services exposed publicly in code posted to GitHub. Using the data, researcher Kevin Finisterre was able to access flight log data and images uploaded by DJI customers, including photos of government IDs, drivers licenses, and passports. Some of the data included flight logs from accounts associated with government and military domains.
  • New Study Finds Poorly Secured Smart Toys Lets Attackers Listen In On Your Kids
    We've long noted how the painful lack of security and privacy standards in the internet of (broken) things is also very well-represented in the world of connected toys. Like IOT vendors, toymakers were so eager to make money, they left even basic privacy and security standards stranded in the rear view mirror as they rush to connect everything to the internet. As a result, we've seen repeated instances where your kids' conversations and interests are being hoovered up without consent, with the data frequently left unencrypted and openly accessible in the cloud. With Luddites everywhere failing to realize that modern Barbie needs a better firewall, this is increasingly becoming a bigger problem. The latest case in point: new research by Which? and the German consumer group Stiftung Warentest found yet more flaws in Bluetooth and wifi-enabled toys that allow a total stranger to listen in on or chat up your toddler:
  • Amazon Key flaw makes entering your home undetected a possibility
  • How to fix a program without the source code? Patch the binary directly
  • ​Google Home and Amazon Echo hit by big bad Bluetooth flaws
  • Senator urges ad blocking by feds as possible remedy to malvertising scourge
    A US Senator trying to eradicate the Internet scourge known as malvertising is proposing that all federal agencies block ads delivered to worker computers unless advertisers can ensure their networks are free of content that contains malicious code. In a letter sent today, Oregon Senator Ron Wyden asked White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Rob Joyce to begin discussions with advertising industry officials to ensure ads displayed on websites can't be used to infect US government computers. If, after 180 days, Joyce isn't "completely confident" the industry has curbed the problem, Wyden asked that Joyce direct the US Department of Homeland Security to issue a directive "requiring federal agencies to block the delivery to employees' computers of all Internet ads containing executable code." "Malware is increasingly delivered through code embedded in seemingly innocuous advertisements online," Wyden wrote. "Individuals do not even need to click on ads to get infected: this malicious software, including ransomware, is delivered without any interaction by the user."
  • Weekend code warriors prepare to clash in Codewarz
    If you didn't have any weekend plans yet—or maybe even if you did—and you're interested in scratching your programming itch, there's something to add to your calendar. Codewarz, a programming competition that presents participants with 24 coding challenges, is running its first live event starting at 1pm Eastern on November 18 and ending at 9pm on November 20. This is not a hacking competition—it’s strictly coding. Participants can use their language of choice as long as it's one of the 15 supported by the event: the various flavors of C, Python, Node.js, Scala, PHP, Go, Ruby, and even BASH. (Sorry, no one has asked them to support ADA or Eiffel yet.) There's no compiling required, either. Each submitted solution is run in an interpreted sandbox on a Linux machine for evaluation and scoring. And the challenges run the gamut from beginner (things like text parsing, math and basic networking) to advanced (more advanced parsing and math, hashing, cryptography, and forensics challenges).

KVM & Xen Don't Change Much With Linux 4.15

There are a ton of exciting improvements building up in Linux 4.15, but not too much on the virtualization front. The Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) work this time around isn't too exciting with no big ticket items debuting for Linux 4.15. KVM for this next kernel release finally has Python 3 support within the Python script that collects runtime statistics from the KVM kernel module. Most of the other work is relatively small additions and fixes. There is some optimizations to ARM's timer handling, PowerPC support for running in a hashed page table MMU mode and single-threaded mode support on POWER9, s390 prep work for exitless interrupts and crypto, and on the x86 front are some fixes, improved emulation in a few areas, and other small work. Read more