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About Tux Machines

Friday, 27 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux: Awesome is Awesome! srlinuxx 14/03/2011 - 3:16pm
Story Debian 6.0 “Squeeze”: What’s New? srlinuxx 14/03/2011 - 3:15pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 396 srlinuxx 14/03/2011 - 2:04pm
Story In Search of the King of the Linux Distros srlinuxx 14/03/2011 - 2:00pm
Story openSUSE 11.4 rocks despite missing GNOME srlinuxx 14/03/2011 - 1:58pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 14/03/2011 - 3:51am
Story On switching to KDE/Xfce srlinuxx 14/03/2011 - 2:18am
Story 10 best alternative operating systems srlinuxx 14/03/2011 - 2:15am
Story The Last Remnants of Sun.com Will Go Down on June 1 srlinuxx 2 14/03/2011 - 1:34am
Story Gentoo 11 or Opensuse 11.4 ? srlinuxx 14/03/2011 - 12:04am

Linux Migrations Made Simpler

Filed under
Linux

Running a Microsoft Windows NT server these days is a brave (or, perhaps, stupid) thing to do: Support for the product has finished, and as far as Microsoft is concerned, the product should be put in a rest home for retired software. There are many reasons to consider migrating some or all of your data center servers to Linux, and we won't go into them here. But if you do decide to go open source, some ways of going about it are better than others.

Browsing, Open Source and Litigious Affairs

Internetnews.com wades through the top stories and issues that rocked the industry in 2006 in this ongoing series.

Red Hat: Earnings up, customers in, competitors out

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat knocked the ball out of the park again this quarter, especially in light of the competitive pressures from Microsoft/Novell and Oracle. I joined in the earnings call today, and was very impressed.

Linux Devices in 2006

Filed under
Linux

As 2006 winds to a close, the editors of LinuxDevices.com have assembled a retrospective aimed at highlighting major trends and events in the world of embedded Linux. Of the approximately 1,200 stories we published this year, these were the most important, in our opinion.

Looking into the FSF's BadVista campaign

Filed under
Microsoft

BadVista is the latest in a series of activist campaigns launched by the Free Software Foundation (FSF)in the last eight months. It follows the highly successful Defective By Design campaign against so-called Digital Rights Management (DRM) technologies, and an unnamed effort to encourage the activist media to make free software part of their agenda.

Hans Reiser Selling Company

Filed under
Reiser
Interviews

Hans Reiser, the prominent Bay Area Linux programmer charged with murdering his wife, says he's seeking to sell off his open-source file system company, Namesys, to help pay mounting legal costs.

ATI AYiR 2006

Filed under
Software

Earlier this month our NVIDIA AYiR (A Year in Review) 2006 article was published. Now it is ATI Technologies turn as we see how they have revolutionized their much-debated Linux fglrx display drivers. We also benchmarked all twelve of their drivers from this year and see what the ATI/AMD camp has in store for next year. Without further ado, we present the ATI AYiR 2006!

Creating Partitions in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Partitions are physical or logical portions of a disk; a filesystem is the logical arrangement of data on a physical or logical partition so that your computer system can access and store data there.

Librarians stake their future on open source

Filed under
OSS

A group of librarians at the Georgia Public Library Service has developed an open source, enterprise-class library management system that may revolutionize the way large-scale libraries are run.

Snowballz: Snowball Throwing RTS

Filed under
Gaming

If you're in a local that's missing out on snow this year, give Snowballz a try. Drive your penguin horde against the opponents and freeze them with snowballs.

More Here.

Linux powers controllable Christmas lights for charity

Filed under
Linux

Alek Komarnitsky's controllable Christmas lights started out as a hoax, but now Komarnitsky is using Linux to power the controllable Christmas lights for real. Since Komarnitsky is based in Lafayette, Colo., just an hour or so away from my home in Denver, I decided to drive up and see the lights for myself. I toured Komarnitsky's home and looked over his controllable Christmas light setup, and talked to him about the history of the project.

Assessing the scalability of open source

Filed under
OSS

Small businesses with small budgets can save a lot of money by deploying open-source software — at least in theory. Also in theory, large companies stand to save even more because they need so many more copies of each software program. But is open source really scalable enough to grow with your company? Let's look at some of the pros and cons.

Has the Desktop Linux Bubble Burst?

Filed under
Linux

In 2002, both KDE and GNOME released their last major revisions; KDE released KDE 3.0 on 3rd April, while GNOME followed shortly after with GNOME 2.0 on 27th June. For the Linux desktop, therefore, 2002 was an important year. Since then, we have continiously been fed point releases which added bits of functionaility and speed improvements, but no major revision has yet seen the light of day. What's going on?

Women flock to Linux talkfest

Filed under
Linux

Female registrations have hit an all time high for Linux.conf.au (LCA) to be held in Sydney next year. More than 50 women have signed up to the traditionally male dominated event, which represents approximately 10% of the overall number of registrations.

KVM Virtualization solution to be tightly integrated with Linux kernel 2.6.20

Filed under
Linux

There is good news on the horizon... which is that Linus Torvalds has merged the KVM code - which is the Kernel Virtual Machine Module in the kernel source tree leading to Linux Kernel 2.6.20. This opens up a lot of avenues as far as Linux is concerned.

Kurt Pfeifle (pipitas): klik service gaining new features (adding some more user friendliness)

Filed under
Software

probono klik's has added a few cool hacks to the klik server. One is that all package recipes which are auto-created from the Debian repositories and klik's "server side apt" do now display version numbers. So if you browse the klik recipe repository, you'll now see how much net load you'll get in a minute.

Jono Bacon: Exaile

Filed under
Software

A mail to the LUGRadio email address pointed to a media player called Exaile. It is a GTK based media player using GStreamer, written in Python, and aims to be the same kind of kitchen-sink media player that Amarok is to the KDE desktop. So, I gave it a whirl, and I am pretty impressed.

Activism and Promotion

Filed under
OSS

Something that is really counterproductive in many Open Source communities are people who are so rabidly fanatical about one line of thinking that they try to pressure everyone into their line of thinking.

Book review: How Linux Works

Filed under
Reviews

Ok, so you are a Linux user or a power user. The question then is what does it take to become a valid, omnipotent, root-enabled superuser? One potential answer is read the book How Linux Works, by Brian Ward and published by No Starch Press, by the last word of the last chapter you may or may not have been transformed, a wizard waiting to be born.

Jeremy Allison Has Resigned from Novell to Protest MS Patent Deal

Filed under
SUSE

The legendary Jeremy Allison (of Samba fame) has resigned from Novell in protest over the Microsoft-Novell patent agreement, which he calls "a mistake" which will be "damaging to Novell's success in the future."

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FOSS in 3D Printing

  • Open source wifi enabled 3D printer controller Franklin speeds up with new release
    3D printing hit the mainstream a few years ago thanks in part to the open-source 3D printer market. The origins of this transition had to do with expiring patents held by the traditionally held commercial 3D printing companies. Since then, several small businesses have sprung up around the emerging low-cost 3D printer market. Some of these companies embraced the open-source mentality, while others are seeking shelter with patents.
  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Open-Source Myoelectric Hand Prosthesis
    Hands can grab things, build things, communicate, and we control them intuitively with nothing more than a thought. To those who miss a hand, a prosthesis can be a life-changing tool for carrying out daily tasks. We are delighted to see that [Alvaro Villoslada] joined the Hackaday Prize with his contribution to advanced prosthesis technology: Dextra, the open-source myoelectric hand prosthesis.
  • BCN3D Technologies releases open source files for BCN3D Sigma 3D printer
    As our readers will know, an important part of the 3D printing community is the idea of accessibility. Of course, it is more than just an idea, as everyday makers around the world share their 3D designs and models for free, and even 3D printing companies exercise an open-source philosophy with DIY 3D printers and accessible models. Recently, Barcelona based 3D printer developer BCN3D Technologies decided to further embrace the additive manufacturing open-source philosophy with their latest initiative, Open Source 360º. As part of the initiative, the company has announced that it will share all of its engineering, design, and fabrication information used in the manufacturing of their flagship product, the BCN3D Sigma 3D printer.
  • Shellmo: Aquatic 3D printed robot for fun and education
    Recently I came across a very interesting open hardware project called Shellmo. What caught my eye was that it's a 3D printed crustacean that seems to have no apparent real world use, though with a little creativity I can see educational implications. Shellmo is a unique, almost cartoon-like creatures that could captivate the imagination of children while at the same time affording them an opportunity to 3D print their own robot. With the current emphasis on STEM in education, Shellmo appears to be the kind of project that would stimulate student interest.

LibreOffice Liberation

  • Sun, sea, and open source: How Spain's Balearic islands are trying to turn into a tech paradise
    However, work remains to be done, especially on civil servants' desktops. "We started by replacing MSN Office", explains Villoslada. "Thanks to free office suite LibreOffice 5, we may overcome compatibility problems with documents coming in from different versions of MSN Office. We already have 1,000 Office licenses which are not necessary anymore, and we plan not to renew over 5,500 licenses purchased in 2007", he adds.
  • The Document Liberation Project: What we do
    While The Document Foundation is best known for LibreOffice, it also backs the Document Liberation Project. But what exactly is that? We’ve made a short video to explain all…

Kali Linux Alternative: BackBox Linux 4.6 Released With Updated Hacking Tools

BackBox Linux, a Kali Linux alternative, is here with its latest version i.e. BackBox Linux 4.6. Based on Ubuntu Linux, this hacking operating system is now available for download with updated hacking tools and Ruby 2.2. Read more

Chromebook and GNU/Linux

  • Turn Your Old Laptop into a Chromebook
    Once the drive is ready with bootable CloudReady, plug it into the target PC and boot the system. It may take a while for the system to boot into Chromium OS. Once booted, you will see the screen shown in Figure 3.
  • Running Linux and Chrome OS Together Using Crouton
    Leo Laporte is a longtime technology commentator and also the host of the show “The Screen Savers,” on the TWiT Netcast Network. In this video he explains how to install Linux on a Chromebook using Crouton, an open source tool developed by Google employee David Schneider.