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Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

spyGoogle wareDesktop

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Google I click on preferences and instead of popping up a local preference dialog, I am taken to a web page webpage that looks like for my preferences. And look at that, there is my directory structure listed smack dab at the top.

QuickBooks and Linux: A Server Story

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linuxplanet: For businesses that use Linux servers for their back-end operations--a category now growing by double-digits quarterly according to IDC--availability of applications is often the most significant bottleneck. As a result, some organizations find themselves in the uncomfortable position of needing to support two back-end platforms.

Test Drive: the new Google Desktop for Linux

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arstechnia: The first public beta of Google Desktop for Linux is now available for download. Released yesterday, this early beta only supports a limited subset of Google Desktop functionality. The current Google Desktop for Linux beta only offers search and versioning functionality and doesn't support other features like the Google sidebar or widgets, but the work done so far is very good.

Lightning and Sunbird 0.5 released

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Moz/FF The newest versions of Lightning and Sunbird, released simultaneously by Mozilla yesterday, include 38 new calendars as well as support for Google Calendar, a viable print function, enhanced support for Outlook displays and numerous other upgrades.

No OLPCs for Cuba or enemies of the US

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tech.blorge: The US and Cuba don’t get along so well, in so far as it is illegal for US citizens to travel to Cuba. The OLPC (One laptop per child) was developed to provide cheap computers to children in developing nations. Cuba among other countries will not be getting them, ever.

Mandriva sponsoring aKademy 2007, handing out free Flashes

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adamw’s blog: Cool news: we’re sponsoring aKademy 2007 (the KDE developers’ / users’ conference) at the Silver level, and as if that wasn’t enough, we’re also handing out free Mandriva Flashes to the developers attending the conference.

full circle magazine Issue 2 ready

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Issue 2 of the Ubuntu -centric monthly electronic magazine has been released. This month's highlights include: Flavour of the Month - Kubuntu. How-To - Ubuntu on the Intel Mac Mini, and Ubuntu for your Grandma!

EU support for open source software

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OSS An EU-funded consortium will address one of the perceived barriers for the adoption of open source software and prove once and for all that software which is free and publishes its source code, is capable of outperforming anything else on the market.

OpenBSD founder: Intel leaves open-source out in the cold

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ZDNet Blogs: OpenBSD founder Theo de Raadt wants Intel to come clean on the severity of bugs in the Intel Core 2 processors, warning that some of the bugs “will *ASSUREDLY* be exploitable from userland code.”

Rsync backup solutions

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Software To setup a quick and efficient backup system, all you need is rsync and that’s it. Rsync is a very powerful tool that can do anything and everything that has to do with moving files around within and across different networks and securely.

Options in Calc

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LinuxJournal: Like other applications, Calc has several dozen options in how it is formatted and operates. Some of the tabs for these options resemble those found in other applications. Others are unique to Calc and the business of spreadsheets. Either way, the more you know about Calc's options, the more you can take control of your work.

Linux contributor base broadens

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LinuxWorld: As the number of Linux kernel contributors continues to grow, core developers are finding themselves mostly managing and checking, not coding, said Greg Kroah-Hartman, maintainer of USB and PCI support in Linux and co-author of Linux Device Drivers, in a talk at the Linux Symposium in Ottawa Thursday.

Also: Day one at the Ottawa Linux Symposium

GIMP tricks: Rotating Sphere with GAP

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polishlinux: This article shows how to create an rotating sphere in GIMP with GAP plugin. Basic knowledge of this graphics manipulation suite will be required to successfully follow the tutorial.

Linux to the White House in 2008?

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itbusiness: Is operating system preference a presidential predictor? Blogger Douglas Karr pondered the question over the weekend. He didn’t come up with a definitive answer, but he does predict that Linux will win the 2008 presidential election.

AMD 8.38.7 Display Driver

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phoronix: The train has gone off the tracks. In The Truth About ATI/AMD & Linux, AMD's Matthew Tippett had shared with us that the AMD driver release cycle is like a train and that "...we are on the train, and to add a new carriage or update the carriage, we have to do it while the train is running, without stopping the train, or letting anything fall off."

Over 5,500 Projects Slated to Adopt GPL 3

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OSS The official final release of the GPL is still a day away, but it's possible that over 5,500 projects could be migrating to it in very quickly.

Introducing PCLinuxOS Business Edition

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We offer a Desktop solution that is primarily geared to the SOHO, one man shop/business where everything can be done right on your one machine. There are all the business oriented applications you could want, from word processing to graphics production, making bar code labels to spreadsheets and databases.

Is Linux Splitting into Two Factions?

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Kevin Carmony: With the recent news of several Linux vendors entering into partnership agreements with Microsoft (Novell, Linspire, Xandros), there has been much debate recently about two factions of Linux forming. Saying that Linux is going to be torn in two, makes for good press and lively debates, but this is certainly nothing new for Linux.

Also: Is a Linux Civil War in the Making?

Is Red Hat the pot calling the kettle black?

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Linux My my. Who would have thought that Microsoft actually would dominate the discussions in the world of Linux and Open Source. In an interview with Reuters, Szulik declined to say whether his company is now in negotiations with Microsoft over signing such a patent agreement. “I can’t answer the question,” he said.

Also: Slashdot gets it wrong again

Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 2 Released

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LinuxLookup: Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 2, which will in time become Ubuntu 7.10 has just been released for testing. Pre-releases of Gutsy are *not* encouraged for anyone needing a stable system.

Also: Why you should be excited about Ubuntu 7.10
And: Screenshots

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KDE Applications 16.12 Software Suite Lands December 15 for KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS

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Android Leftovers

Security News

  • How your DVR was hijacked to help epic cyberattack
    Technology experts warned for years that the millions of Internet-connected "smart" devices we use every day are weak, easily hijacked and could be turned against us. The massive siege on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors and routes Internet traffic, shows those ominous predictions are now a reality. An unknown attacker intermittently knocked many popular websites offline for hours Friday, from Amazon to Twitter and Netflix to Etsy. How the breach occurred is a cautionary tale of the how the rush to make humdrum devices “smart” while sometimes leaving out crucial security can have major consequences.
  • Find Out If One of Your Devices Helped Break the Internet
    Security experts have been warning for years that the growing number of unsecured Internet of Things devices would bring a wave of unprecedented and catastrophic cyber attacks. Just last month, a hacker publicly released malware code used in a record-breaking attack that hijacked 1.5 million internet-connected security cameras, refrigerators, and other so-called “smart” devices that were using default usernames and passwords. On Friday, the shit finally hit the fan.
  • Once more, with passion: Fingerprints suck as passwords
    Fingerprints aren’t authentication. Fingerprints are identity. They are usernames. Fingerprints are something public, which is why it should really bother nobody with a sense of security that the FBI used them to unlock seized phones. You’re literally leaving your fingerprints on every object you touch. That makes for an abysmally awful authentication token.
  • Strengthen cyber-security with Linux
    Using open source software is a viable and proven method of combatting cyber-crime It’s encouraging to read that the government understands the seriousness of the loss of $81 million dollars via the hacking of Bangladesh Bank, and that a cyber-security agency is going to be formed to prevent further disasters. Currently, information security in each government department is up to the internal IT staff of that department.
  • Canonical announces live kernel patching for Ubuntu
    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has announced that it will provide a live kernel patching services for version 16.04 which was released in April.
  • Everything you know about security is wrong
    If I asked everyone to tell me what security is, what do you do about it, and why you do it. I wouldn't get two answers that were the same. I probably wouldn't even get two that are similar. Why is this? After recording Episode 9 of the Open Source Security Podcast I co-host, I started thinking about measuring a lot. It came up in the podcast in the context of bug bounties, which get exactly what they measure. But do they measure the right things? I don't know the answer, nor does it really matter. It's just important to keep this in mind as in any system, you will get exactly what you measure. [...] If you have 2000 employees, 200 systems, 4 million lines of code, and 2 security people, that's clearly a disaster waiting to happen. If you have 20, there may be hope. I have no idea what the proper ratios should be, if you're willing to share ratios with me I'd love to start collecting data. As I said, I don't have scientific proof behind this, it's just something I suspect is true.
  • Home Automation: Coping with Insecurity in the IoT
    Reading Matthew Garret’s exposés of home automation IoT devices makes most engineers think “hell no!” or “over my dead body!”. However, there’s also the siren lure that the ability to program your home, or update its settings from anywhere in the world is phenomenally useful: for instance, the outside lights in my house used to depend on two timers (located about 50m from each other). They were old, loud (to the point the neighbours used to wonder what the buzzing was when they visited) and almost always wrongly set for turning the lights on at sunset. The final precipitating factor for me was the need to replace our thermostat, whose thermistor got so eccentric it started cooling in winter; so away went all the timers and their loud noises and in came a z-wave based home automation system, and the guilty pleasure of having an IoT based home automation system. Now the lights precisely and quietly turn on at sunset and off at 23:00 (adjusting themselves for daylight savings); the thermostat is accessible from my phone, meaning I can adjust it from wherever I happen to be (including Hong Kong airport when I realised I’d forgotten to set it to energy saving mode before we went on holiday). Finally, there’s waking up at 3am to realise your wife has fallen asleep over her book again and being able to turn off her reading light from your alarm clock without having to get out of bed … Automation bliss!

Microsoft Corruption, Rejections, and Struggles

  • Microsoft licensing corruption scandal in Romania has ended on October 3rd
    This scandal covers buying Microsoft licensees for Romanian administration from 2004 to 2012 for total 228 millions USD. During the investigation was found that more than 100 people, former ministers, mayor of Bucuresti and businessman are involved in this corruption scandal and more than 20 millions euro are paid as bribes.
  • 49ers Colin Kaepernick, Chip Kelly review Microsoft Surface tablets, which Bill Belichick is ‘done’ using
    Ranting about Microsoft’s unreliable, sideline tablets is not a top priority for 49ers coach Chip Kelly and quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not with a five-game losing streak in tow for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. But both Kelly and Kaepernick confirmed this week that they’ve experienced problems with the Microsoft Surface tablets. They’re just not as fed up with them as New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, who’s lambasted the imperfect technology for years and finally declared this week: “I’m done with the tablets.”
  • Windows: When no growth is an improvement
    Research firms like IDC and Gartner have continued to forecast contraction, not expansion, in the PC business. Only when enterprise migrations to Windows 10 kick into gear do analysts see a reversal of the industry’s historic slump. That isn’t expected to happen until next year.