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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why I left Ubuntu srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 8:17pm
Story Crunchbang Movin’ on up srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 8:14pm
Story Memory usage improvements for KDEPIM 4.11 srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 8:13pm
Story Happy 20th Anniversary, Slackware! srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 8:12pm
Story Linux for Workgroups and Microsoft's Open Source Relationship srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 4:51pm
Story Surprise Attack launches Australia's first indie publisher srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 4:50pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 6:26am
Story Linux distro watch: UberStudent srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 6:17am
Story Red Hat building's top has some seeing red srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 3:07am
Story KDE 4.11 RC1 Released srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 2:06am

few leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How to fix broken Firefox extensions

  • Transformation at Red Hat?
  • All pieces together (Lancelot)
  • Noncertified Linux professionals make more than certified peers
  • How to be a faithful fan

Choosing a Desktop for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

itmanagement: "It's like starting another operating system," a colleague complained recently when he switched from the GNOME to the KDE desktop. He was exaggerating, but the impression is accurate.

Lotus Symphony Linux Beta Review

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: Recently I’ve laid my hands on the new IBM’s child — Lotus Symphony (beta version). It is an office suite based on OpenOffice.org. Lotus Symphony includes text editor, spreadsheet and presentation tool. I’ve, decided to try this new IBM wonder.

The OpenOffice.org Impress presenter screen

Filed under
OOo

LWN: While OpenOffice.org's Impress is a reasonable presentation program, it lacks one often-requested feature: the provision of a separate screen for the presenter. So it is encouraging that the OOo developers have just announced that this feature is now in development.

An open letter to Steve Ballmer from Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

François Bancilhon: We recently closed a deal with the Nigerian Government. Maybe you heard about it, Steve. They were looking for an affordable hardware+software solution for their schools. The initial batch was 17,000 machines. Then your people entered the game and the deal got more competitive.

Commandline Interface

Overcoming THE FEAR

Filed under
OSS

penguin pete: This being Halloween, it seems appropriate to talk about fear. Why don't more desktop users adapt to free computing? THE FEAR. The command line. Scary stuff, for some.

Living with Mandriva 2008

Filed under
MDV

linuxtechdaily: When Mandriva 2008 came out, I decided to stick with it, day in and day out and see how I felt. This isn’t a review, just a look at my experience with it. For those wanting a review, I’ll imitate one in one paragraph!

Fedora struggles with harm reduction via Codec Buddy

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: In public health, harm reduction is a practice that, rather than trying to eradicate potentially dangerous choices like prostitution, tries to minimize their effects. Often, the practice involves a limited condoning of the practice, such as safe injection sites for addicts. Harm reduction is the path that Fedora 8 has chosen on the issue of MP3 and other non-free codecs in the form of Codec Buddy.

The Command Line is Part of the Desktop!

Filed under
Linux

Don't be a "Putzbuntu!"

Why Mr. and Ms. Desktop Distro need to discover the Command Line. Part one of a series that may never end.

Halloween XII: What’s really behind those Microsoft licenses?

Filed under
OSS

zdnet blogs: In the last week of October 1998, a confidential Microsoft memo detailing their strategy against Linux and Open source was leaked to Eric S. Raymond, who annotated it and posted it on the web. This became known as the first Halloween Document. Between 1998 and 2004 Eric posted 10 other Halloween Documents. Now it’s 2007...

Squandering one of the industry's best open source talents

Filed under
OSS

matt asay: I think Miguel de Icaza is an exceptional developer and effective community leader. I can't help but wonder why he's squandering his talents on writing largely irrelevant code (Mono, Moonlight) that appeals to himself, Novell, Microsoft, and no one else.

Almost the Google PC: Everex gPC available at Wal-Mart

Filed under
Linux

c|net blog: On Thursday, WalMart begins selling the Everex Green gPC TC2502, a $198, low-powered, Linux-based PC that's designed primarily for running Web 2.0 apps.

The PS3: great, but will it run Linux?

Filed under
Linux

gaming.hexus.net: Sometimes, doing what you're told or permitted to do isn't enough. For decades, the geeks of the world have looked at common conventional items of consumer electronics, and wondered "could I do something else with this?"

Review: NimbleX 2007

Filed under
Linux

raiden's realm: NimbleX is a Linux distribution built on the idea that "fast is best". It comes complete with a lot of great tools to help you do a wide variety of tasks. Even though it's setup as a desktop distribution, the uses for NimbleX are quite extensive.

Top 10 Reasons Not to Use Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxtoday blog: I thought I would give you ten reasons why you shouldn't use Ubuntu so when your Ubuntu-loving friends tell you about it you can be armed with some reasons why you would rather use Windows.

ASUS Eee PC: Exclusive Inside Look!

Filed under
Hardware

tweaktown.com: So to make this review more interesting we have decided to look under the Eee PC’s skirt to see what makes her so cute and sexy. We have taken the Eee PC apart to the component level and we are going to divulge each and every bulge.

Also: Cheap Asus Eee Linux Laptop Now On Sale in the States

Luis Villa running for the GNOME Foundation Board

Filed under
OSS

Luis Villa’s Blog: As I just announced on foundation-list, I’ll be running again for the Board this year. This will be an unusual candidacy. I will not be running to do various and sundry board tasks; I’ll be running to do exactly one thing:

Also: Will GNOME split give Microsoft Open XML standards win?

halloween fun

Filed under
Humor
  • Happy Halloween from a PC (pumpkin computer)

  • When a Geek Carves a Pumpkin
  • Winner of RHmag Pumpkin Contest

Dell Ubuntu computers cost more than Windows equivalent - so what?

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire: It's hard to believe that Dell is serious about its well-publicised program to put Linux computers on the global market when there are blatantly obvious instances where the limited range of Ubuntu notebooks and desktops are more expensive than their Windows equivalent. However, is pricing as important as some may think?

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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