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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 08 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 11/09/2012 - 5:14pm
Story The Perfect Server - OpenSUSE 12.2 x86_64 (Apache2, Dovecot, ISPConfig 3) falko 11/09/2012 - 6:32am
Story The Lynx Experience srlinuxx 11/09/2012 - 3:21am
Story SimplyMEPIS 12 Alpha 2 Shows Direction srlinuxx 11/09/2012 - 3:19am
Story The AGPL: Solution in Search of a Problem srlinuxx 11/09/2012 - 1:37am
Story GNOME is simply losing its grasp srlinuxx 11/09/2012 - 1:34am
Story Ten Suggestions For The GNOME Camp srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 11:59pm
Story Ubuntu vs Linux Mint srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 11:58pm
Story Linux on the (consumer) Desktop srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 11:44pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 473 srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 8:03pm

Vista Ultimate vs. Ubuntu 7.04 - Which Install Is Easier?

Filed under
OS

scitech.teambio.org: This weekend I suffered a meltdown of my workstation’s main hard drive. The drive held my Windows Vista Ultimate install. This time, Vista was going to have company - and maybe competition. This time, Ubuntu 7.04 was getting an equal share of the drive.

Gentoo Infrastructure Press Release

Filed under
Gentoo
Security

On August 7, 2007, bannedit reported bug 187971 regarding a possible command injection vulnerability within http://packages.gentoo.org. The Infrastructure team verified the vulnerability and the server was immediately taken down to prevent further exploitation and to allow for forensic analysis.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • New tilesets for KMahjongg and KShisen

  • The homogenization of the UNIX world
  • Freespire 2.0: First look and impressions
  • Changing lots of passwords at once
  • Novell doesn't want to be the next SCO
  • Musings on Gnomedex and evolution
  • Oracle CEO Ellison: Open source software is no threat
  • Mainframe Linux
  • In Wake Of SCO Ruling, Torvalds Sticks To Kernel
  • Linux looking to conquer apps, data center, edge
  • Tip of the Trade: SystemImager

KDE 4.0 Beta 1 w/ MEPIS Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: The first beta of KDE 4.0 was released earlier this month and Warren Woodford of the MEPIS project has now built a version of SimplyMEPIS 7 that is based upon Debian Etch with the 32-bit and 64-bit KDE 4.0 Beta 1 packages.

Kernel space: Once upon atime

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld: Among the metadata maintained by most filesystems is the last file access time, or "atime." This time can be a useful value to have - it lets an administrator (or a program) know when a file was last used.

Lesser Known Applications for Linux — Health and Food

Filed under
KDE

richardfcrawley: This will be an ongoing series of articles highlighting lesser known applications for Linux. This installment will review applications for health and food.

Pokin' around Ubuntu 7.10 alpha 4 and openSuse 10.3 beta 1

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogbeebe: Well, it's getting to be that time of the year when the next generation of Linux distributions are ripening towards release. So I went over to the openSuse site and grabbed a copy of 10.3 beta 1 and then over to the Ubuntu testing site and grabbed 7.10 Tribe (alpha) 4.

Gutsy and openSUSE 10.3 Beta1

Filed under
SUSE

laserjock.wordpress.com: Last night I installed openSUSE 10.3 Beta1 on a spare 10GB partition I had on my laptop. I’d like to share just a few thoughts from my, maybe more developer biased, perspective:

Ask a penguin to see which way Linux wind blows

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: The nonprofit Linux Foundation has unveiled the Linux Weather Forecast, a Web site aimed at giving people a better sense of the status of specific Linux kernel projects.

Linux: Determining Maintainers

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In an overwhelmingly large series of 556 patches, Joe Perches attempted to track down maintainers for a significant number of files within the Linux kernel source tree. He explained, "I grew weary of looking up the appropriate maintainer email address(es) to CC: for a patch", adding a new line format to the kernel MAINTAINERS file parsed by a new get_maintainer.pl script.

Linux Foundation adds legal eagles

Filed under
Linux

Linux-Watch: Once upon a time, the only thing Linux needed was great coders. That was a long time ago. Today, Linux needs excellent lawyers as well to navigate the 21st century's increasingly lawsuit-happy IT world. To address that concern, the LF (Linux Foundation) has added two top attorneys to its ranks.

$99 Desktop Comes With Too Many Catches

Filed under
Linux

LinuxInsider: Zonbu's overall goal is to vastly simplify the process of buying and using a computer. The idea is to make it not only more affordable but also much less of a hassle and much more energy efficient. However, there's a catch -- several catches, in fact. Some have to do with the machine's design and pricing, and others with its performance.

Some Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Transferring Files Over Bluetooth using a BlackBerry Curve, Pearl, or 8800

  • How to install Tor with Vidalia GUI on Ubuntu
  • Privacy and Encryption with PGP : Signing and Encrypting Email / Files

Interesting Shorts:

Filed under
Software
  • True Transparency For Raptor

  • Ext3 File Systems in Windows
  • Thoughts that make me go hmmm!
  • Watch two kids repair the XO laptop
  • LunchMeet: Ubuntu is Linux for Human Beings

"A few more" versions of Linux Kernel 2.6.20 planned

Filed under
Linux

heise online: Willy Tarreau, maintainer of the 2.4 kernel series, wants to continue to oversee the Linux version 2.6.20 a bit longer than the maintainers of the stable kernel series would normally have done.

Sabayon Linux: Something for everyone

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Linux.com: The Sabayon Linux live DVD distribution, based on the unstable branch of Gentoo Linux, has been in development for several years and caters to a wide variety of users. Having started out with a beautiful but mainstream appearance, it now boasts one of the most unique looks in Linux and more usability options than most other distros.

How to use Quake-style terminals on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

FreeSoftware Mag: We know all about how powerful the GNU/Linux terminal is. However, it’s a pain to have to fire up a terminal emulator like Konsole or gnome-terminal, wait for a few seconds for it load, and then have to keep Alt-Tabbing to it. Wouldn’t it be easier to just have a terminal that automatically hides and shows itself at click of a button? Today, I’m going to look at three different terminal emulators that do just that.

A Tale of Two SCOs

Filed under
OS

Linux Online: Everyone is focusing on the death sentence that was handed to SCO last Friday. But that was really a mere formality. SCO has been dead for quite some time. Such is the fate of those who live by litigation and not by making good products.

Ubuntu tries to go LoCo in all 50 states

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: The Ubuntu community is seeking to get approved Local Community (LoCo) teams in all 50 states in the US by the end of this year, and it's making impressive progress.

Desktop Faceoff: Fedora vs. Vista

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement: Every few months, a pundit asks, "Is Linux ready for the desktop?" The implication, of course, is that it hasn't been -- at least, not until very recently. Based on a wide array of criteria, an in-depth look reveals that (like a growing number of GNU/Linux distributions) Fedora 7 takes second place to nothing -- not even Windows Vista.

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Remembering Linux Installfests

Ah, yes. I remember the good old days when you had to be a real man or woman to install Linux, and the first time you tried you ended up saying something like “Help!” or maybe “Mommmmyyyyy!” Really, kids, that’s how it was. Stacks of floppies that took about 7,000 hours to download over your 16 baud connection. Times sure have changed, haven’t they? I remember Caldera advertising that their distribution autodetected 1,500 different monitors. I wrote an article titled “Monitor Number 1501,” because it didn’t detect my monitor. And sound. Getting sound going in Linux took mighty feats of systemic administsationish strength. Mere mortals could not do it. And that’s why we had installfests: so mighty Linux he-men and she-women could come down from the top of Slackware Mountain or the Red Hat Volcano and share their godlike wisdom with us. We gladly packed up our computers and took them to the installfest location (often at a college, since many Linux-skilled people were collegians) and walked away with Linuxized computers. Praise be! Read more

What New Is Going To Be In Ubuntu 17.04 'Zesty Zapus'

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Security News

  • News in brief: DirtyCOW patched for Android; naked lack of security; South Korea hacked
  • Millions exposed to malvertising that hid attack code in banner pixels
    Researchers from antivirus provider Eset said "Stegano," as they've dubbed the campaign, dates back to 2014. Beginning in early October, its unusually stealthy operators scored a major coup by getting the ads displayed on a variety of unnamed reputable news sites, each with millions of daily visitors. Borrowing from the word steganography—the practice of concealing secret messages inside a larger document that dates back to at least 440 BC—Stegano hides parts of its malicious code in parameters controlling the transparency of pixels used to display banner ads. While the attack code alters the tone or color of the images, the changes are almost invisible to the untrained eye.
  • Backdoor accounts found in 80 Sony IP security camera models
    Many network security cameras made by Sony could be taken over by hackers and infected with botnet malware if their firmware is not updated to the latest version. Researchers from SEC Consult have found two backdoor accounts that exist in 80 models of professional Sony security cameras, mainly used by companies and government agencies given their high price. One set of hard-coded credentials is in the Web interface and allows a remote attacker to send requests that would enable the Telnet service on the camera, the SEC Consult researchers said in an advisory Tuesday.
  • I'm giving up on PGP
    After years of wrestling GnuPG with varying levels of enthusiasm, I came to the conclusion that it's just not worth it, and I'm giving up. At least on the concept of long term PGP keys. This is not about the gpg tool itself, or about tools at all. Many already wrote about that. It's about the long term PGP key model—be it secured by Web of Trust, fingerprints or Trust on First Use—and how it failed me.

OpenSUSE Ends Support For Binary AMD Graphics Driver

Bruno Friedmann has announced the end to AMD proprietary driver fglrx support in openSUSE while also announcing they don't plan to support the hybrid proprietary AMDGPU-PRO stack either. Friedmann wrote, "Say goodbye fglrx!, repeat after me, goodbye fglrx... [In regards to the newer AMDGPU-PRO stack] I will certainly not help proprietary crap, if I don’t have a solid base to work with, and a bit of help from their side. I wish good luck to those who want to try those drivers, I’ve got a look inside, and got a blame face." Read more