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Friday, 27 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Re-election of Debian DPL & Bits from Installer Team cj2003 12/03/2011 - 4:30pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 12/03/2011 - 5:52am
Story Linux AntiVirus: BitDefender srlinuxx 12/03/2011 - 3:25am
Story Pwn2Own: Chrome, Android, Firefox own; Safari, IE8, iOS, BB get pwned srlinuxx 12/03/2011 - 3:24am
Story A decade of Freedom: FSFE turns 10 srlinuxx 12/03/2011 - 3:22am
Story Testing Ubuntu 11.04 “Natty Narwhal” Alpha 3 srlinuxx 12/03/2011 - 1:38am
Story An Open Forge srlinuxx 12/03/2011 - 1:36am
Story openSUSE 11.4 made a splash srlinuxx 12/03/2011 - 1:34am
Story NASA to Host Open Source Summit srlinuxx 2 12/03/2011 - 12:23am
Story Fuduntu 14.9 Stable Released srlinuxx 1 12/03/2011 - 12:19am

GoboLinux : breath of fresh air?

Filed under
Linux

My very first reaction to GoboLinux was negative. The underlying idea of taming the Unix/Linux file system hierarchy with symbolic links isn't new: heck, SCO did that way back with their 3.2v4.0 release, and for exactly the same reasons. But.. you know, the more I read about GoboLinux, the less certain I became that this is a foolish Don Quixote effort.

Download of the day: Firefox 2.0.0.1 - Final Release Version

Filed under
Moz/FF

Yup, new build is out and you grab latest version from ftp server. Bugs fixed so far for Firefox 2.0.0.1: 83 in total; 42 crashers, 3 memory leaks, 41 regressions, and 4 privacy-related bugs.

2006: The year that changed Linux

Filed under
Linux

I've been saying for years that Linux was well along on its way from being the tech fanboy operating system of choice, to becoming one of big business' favorite operating systems. Well, I was right all along, but in 2006, that progress smacked many Linux fans in the face.

Weekly Debian Nubiles #6

Filed under
Linux
Humor

Did you ever get the feeling that maybe all of the adults have left the Debian project for greener pastures (ie Ubuntu)? When you read about developers deliberately sabotaging the release of Etch do you just think "Oh well, another candidate for the famous Linux Hissy-Fit Award" or do you possibly begin to wonder if this points to a deeper, darker, drearier and - notwithstanding my amazing powers of alliteration - way way dastardlier plot.

A survey of Linux file managers

Filed under
Software

Linux file manager ontogeny encapsulates the history of GNU/Linux. File managers began as command-line and generic graphical tools and progressed to desktop-specific ones, gaining sophistication along the way, with mouse controls, for example, replacing buttons. Today, the more than a dozen options highlighted here will suit users with widely varied interests.

Glipper will make GNOME much more usable

Filed under
Software

One key feature GNOME has lacked, in comparison to KDE, is a clipboard manager like KDE's Klipper. That's now about to change, thanks to the efforts of a project called "Glipper."

Howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Linux play encrypted DVDs

  • Recover Data from a Damaged hard disk using dd_rhelp
  • Ubuntu Quicktip - adding extra fonts to your Ubuntu install
  • Open Source Monitoring 101- A Refresher
  • Mount your widows Partitions and make it read and writable
  • Alternate Desktop Manager - Xfce / Fluxbox / Enlightenment / Blackbox / Openbox / Afterstep / FVWM / WindowMaker
  • beryl + ubuntu edgy on dell latitude d600

Naming Apache Geronimo JNDI and connection pools for Java resource, Part 2

Filed under
News

This article, the second installment in this series, shows you how Apache Geronimo, JNDI, and Java Message Service (JMS) resource groups interrelate. Plus you'll learn how to build a JMS resource connection and access it in a simple Geronimo application using JNDI.

Neuros OSD Review

Filed under
Hardware

The Neuros OSD promises a lot - it claims to be the first open source Linux-based embedded media center and it "records video and links your PC, portables and entertainment center". Bold claims, but can it live up to them? Linuxlookup.com has a two page review of the Neuros OSD from both a developer and user perspective.

Setting Up A PXE Install Server For Multiple Linux Distributions With Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a PXE (short for preboot execution environment) install server with Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft). A PXE install server allows your client computers to boot and install a Linux distribution over the network, without the need of burning Linux iso images onto a CD/DVD, boot floppy images, etc. This is handy if your client computers do not have CD or floppy drives, or if you want to set up multiple computers at the same time (e.g. in a large enterprise), or simply because you want to save the money for the CDs/DVDs. In this article I show how to configure a PXE server that allows you to boot multiple distributions: Ubuntu Edgy/Dapper, Debian Etch/Sarge, Fedora Core 6, CentOS 4.4, OpenSuSE 10.2, and Mandriva 2007.

Is KDE 4 The Desktop Answer?

Filed under
KDE

I just read an article about this in ComputerWorld Australia. The article is an interview and talks about some of what will be new in KDE 4. Having used KDE for close to 10 years now, I am clearly a fan but I am not sure KDE 2, 3, 4 or 27 is the answer.

Disgruntled Debian developers delay Etch

Filed under
Linux

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0, codenamed Etch, had been due to arrive by December 4, 2006, but it's been delayed because some developers have deliberately slowed down their work.

Some Howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install and use SSH Server on Ubuntu 6.10

  • Local DNS Cache for Faster Browsing on Ubuntu
  • How to Backup Kontact

Learn 10 good UNIX usage habits

Filed under
Linux

Adopt 10 good habits that improve your UNIX command line efficiency - and break away from bad usage patterns in the process. This article takes you step-by-step through several good, but too often neglected, techniques for command-line operations. Learn about common errors and how to overcome them, so you can learn exactly why these UNIX habits are worth picking up.

Is Linux Ready for Small Biz?

Filed under
Linux

Many small businesses have avoided Linux for a variety of reasons: not enough applications, complexity of installation or that it requires too much technical know-how to run. The technology has matured over many years, which raises the question: how valid are these considerations today?

Why now is the best time to switch to linux

Filed under
Linux

Today’s Linux is leaps and bounds ahead of yesterday’s. It is absolutely amazing to see how far Linux has come in 10, 5, and even 1 year ago. It is now a full featured lock and load desktop operating system that easily rivals windows. Now if we could only remove the fear factor that I discussed earlier get people to see the light.

Sabayon Linux 3.2 Mini Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Sabayon Linux is a relatively new distribution that is known for its looks with the inclusion of AIGLX, XGL, and Beryl. After the recent release of Sabayon Linux 3.2, the Mini Edition of the 3.2 branch has now been updated. Updates include newer ATI and NVIDIA proprietary display drivers, full NTFS read/write support out-of-the-box, and many other package updates and changes. It also looks very nice from the desktop side with its LiveCD. The Screenshots.

Immune your files from accidental deletion

Filed under
HowTos

Okay, when you accidentally type
rm LoveLetterFromJane.txt
Your file are gone, can’t resume it at trash, there are no trash, the document are important to you! Oh My God!! you smack your box!

Jono Bacon: Features vs. Freedom

Filed under
Ubuntu

Recently there has been a lot of discussion bubbling up regarding the possibility that Ubuntu will ship proprietary 3D drivers by default for some video cards. My aim here is not to discuss the specifics of that decision, which is still being fleshed out and ratified, but to instead define my views on the bigger picture behind the discussion - features vs. freedom.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 182

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Distributions in 2006

  • News: Fedora revamps RPM, KNOPPIX 5.1, Debian release update, Arch Linux Office Install CD, Dreamlinux interview
  • Released last week: SabayonLinux 3.2 "miniEdition", VectorLinux 5.8
  • Upcoming releases: Pardus Linux 2007, K12LTSP Linux 6.0
  • New distributions: Kuliax
  • Reader comments

Read more in this year's final issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS in 3D Printing

  • Open source wifi enabled 3D printer controller Franklin speeds up with new release
    3D printing hit the mainstream a few years ago thanks in part to the open-source 3D printer market. The origins of this transition had to do with expiring patents held by the traditionally held commercial 3D printing companies. Since then, several small businesses have sprung up around the emerging low-cost 3D printer market. Some of these companies embraced the open-source mentality, while others are seeking shelter with patents.
  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Open-Source Myoelectric Hand Prosthesis
    Hands can grab things, build things, communicate, and we control them intuitively with nothing more than a thought. To those who miss a hand, a prosthesis can be a life-changing tool for carrying out daily tasks. We are delighted to see that [Alvaro Villoslada] joined the Hackaday Prize with his contribution to advanced prosthesis technology: Dextra, the open-source myoelectric hand prosthesis.
  • BCN3D Technologies releases open source files for BCN3D Sigma 3D printer
    As our readers will know, an important part of the 3D printing community is the idea of accessibility. Of course, it is more than just an idea, as everyday makers around the world share their 3D designs and models for free, and even 3D printing companies exercise an open-source philosophy with DIY 3D printers and accessible models. Recently, Barcelona based 3D printer developer BCN3D Technologies decided to further embrace the additive manufacturing open-source philosophy with their latest initiative, Open Source 360º. As part of the initiative, the company has announced that it will share all of its engineering, design, and fabrication information used in the manufacturing of their flagship product, the BCN3D Sigma 3D printer.
  • Shellmo: Aquatic 3D printed robot for fun and education
    Recently I came across a very interesting open hardware project called Shellmo. What caught my eye was that it's a 3D printed crustacean that seems to have no apparent real world use, though with a little creativity I can see educational implications. Shellmo is a unique, almost cartoon-like creatures that could captivate the imagination of children while at the same time affording them an opportunity to 3D print their own robot. With the current emphasis on STEM in education, Shellmo appears to be the kind of project that would stimulate student interest.

LibreOffice Liberation

  • Sun, sea, and open source: How Spain's Balearic islands are trying to turn into a tech paradise
    However, work remains to be done, especially on civil servants' desktops. "We started by replacing MSN Office", explains Villoslada. "Thanks to free office suite LibreOffice 5, we may overcome compatibility problems with documents coming in from different versions of MSN Office. We already have 1,000 Office licenses which are not necessary anymore, and we plan not to renew over 5,500 licenses purchased in 2007", he adds.
  • The Document Liberation Project: What we do
    While The Document Foundation is best known for LibreOffice, it also backs the Document Liberation Project. But what exactly is that? We’ve made a short video to explain all…

Kali Linux Alternative: BackBox Linux 4.6 Released With Updated Hacking Tools

BackBox Linux, a Kali Linux alternative, is here with its latest version i.e. BackBox Linux 4.6. Based on Ubuntu Linux, this hacking operating system is now available for download with updated hacking tools and Ruby 2.2. Read more

Chromebook and GNU/Linux

  • Turn Your Old Laptop into a Chromebook
    Once the drive is ready with bootable CloudReady, plug it into the target PC and boot the system. It may take a while for the system to boot into Chromium OS. Once booted, you will see the screen shown in Figure 3.
  • Running Linux and Chrome OS Together Using Crouton
    Leo Laporte is a longtime technology commentator and also the host of the show “The Screen Savers,” on the TWiT Netcast Network. In this video he explains how to install Linux on a Chromebook using Crouton, an open source tool developed by Google employee David Schneider.