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Saturday, 30 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Because Your Distro Should Be Cool srlinuxx 24/01/2011 - 9:24pm
Story All-in-one PC offers Core 2 Quad CPU srlinuxx 24/01/2011 - 9:21pm
Story My first look at DIASPORA* srlinuxx 2 24/01/2011 - 8:25pm
Story London's Design Museum Recognizes Ubuntu Fonts sharonpr 24/01/2011 - 7:29pm
Story Sintel The Game srlinuxx 24/01/2011 - 7:03pm
Story Intel Core i5 2500K Linux Performance srlinuxx 24/01/2011 - 7:00pm
Story Red Hat builds gutsy, green virtualization machine srlinuxx 24/01/2011 - 6:55pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 389 srlinuxx 24/01/2011 - 5:16pm
Story Floods can't dampen Linux.conf.au mood srlinuxx 24/01/2011 - 5:14pm
Story Firefox 4 betas 10, 11 planned srlinuxx 24/01/2011 - 5:13pm

The four most trendy Linux developments

Filed under
Linux

The buzz over Linux is hardly new. Vendors of every ilk have tripped over themselves to announce Linux-related products. But even in the deafening noise surrounding Linux, four topics stand out : the duel for the desktop, 3-D desktop tools, isolated virtual environments (also known as containerization or virtualization), and mobile Linux devices.

Analysis - Sun GPLs Java

Filed under
Software

First, Sun Microsystems Inc. wouldn't do it. Then Sun teased us with it. Now, on Nov. 13, Sun will finally open-source its implementations of Java under the GNU GPLv2. On Monday, Sun released the first pieces of source code for Sun's implementation of JSE and a buildable implementation of JME.

Quick Look at Urli OS 6.10

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Urli 6.10 is an Debian/Ubuntu derived Linux OS developed in Argentina. It was recently added to distrowatch's waiting list and sounded a bit interesting given that their motto seems to be "Linux like never before!" Well, this I had to see.

Is Ubuntu set to become non-free?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Last week at the Ubuntu Developer Summit the release goals for Feisty Fawn—scheduled to appear April 2007—were discussed and drawn up. Ubuntu's next version is aiming for some pretty good features such as a bullet proof X.org and network roaming. There's one change that bothers me to no end though: composite by default.

Q&A: VMware co-founder Mendel Rosenblum

Filed under
Interviews

At the third and by far the biggest VMware's annual VMworld convention last week, we grabbed the chance to speak to the company's virtualisation visionary and co-founder, Mendel Rosenblum. Where does he see the company taking this fast-evolving technology?

Month of Kernel Bugs: Linux in the lead

Filed under
OS

At this point in time, nine vulnerabilities in operating system kernels have been publicised as part of the Month of Kernel Bugs. Following on July's Month of Browser Bugs initiated by H.D. Moore, a similar project to highlight security vulnerabilities has been announced for November under the title "Month of Kernel Bugs" (MoKB). The project's initiators intend to release one security hole per day for the various operating system kernels.

Clear indication that Linux has arrived

Filed under
Linux

Oracle’s announcement of providing support on Red Hat Linux is a clear indication that Linux has arrived. Linux, which started out as a hobby among some engineers, is today enterprise-ready and important enough for Oracle to provide support.

openSUSE 10.2 Beta 2 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

The countdown continues on the road to 10.2 with the latest release of beta 2 on the 10th. This release didn't bring too many surprises, but things seem to be shaping up nicely. In light of all the negative publicity of Novell's recent announcement, I imagine the pressure is bearing down on the openSUSE infantry to release a banner system. I wish them luck and I think they are on the right path.

Samba says Novell-Microsoft deal sucks

Filed under
SUSE

THE OPEN SOURCE guys at Samba hit out at Novell's rapprochement with Microsoft, saying they disapproved strongly of the former Utah firm's actions.

Racoon Roadwarrior Configuration

Filed under
HowTos

Roadwarrior is a client that uses unknown, dynamically assigned IP addresses to connect to a VPN gateway (in this case also firewall).

Linux Desktop Search

Filed under
Linux

Searching in Linux starts those venerable command line favorites: find, grep, and locate. These tools are very powerful and can easily be integrated into scripts, but for many users, this usefulness is also one of their key weaknesses. These users require a graphical interface in order to be comfortable with a program.

New book expounds the wonders of GIMP 2

Filed under
Software

A guide to using version 2 of GIMP, the popular open-source digital image editor, was released this month by O'Reilly Media. GIMP 2 for Photographers is like a classroom seminar that starts with the basics, and enables students to learn as much as they want.

Cloning Ubuntu in 7 steps

Filed under
HowTos

The SystemImager concept is that an image server retrieves a golden client's entire system image and deploys it to any number of client systems. A golden client is a system you have customized to work exactly the way you want. You can re-compile the kernel, install custom software, and do any configuration file tweaking you like.

Jono Bacon: Jokosher bug-fixing update

Filed under
Ubuntu

I figured it is time for a Jokosher update. As many of you will know, I have been at the Ubuntu Developer Summit for the last week at Mountain View, and I am now in San Francisco at our Allhands company summit. Jokosher really rocked at UDS, and lots of people were interesting in our little project.

Creating Screencasts on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

I recently created a couple of screencasts for the Ubuntu-UK LoCo team, of which I am a member. I've been tinkering with screencasting for nearly a year now but only recently has everything come together in such a way that I find it easy to make the screencasts. I've been asked to write a guide showing how I created the screencasts at quickones, and here it is.

Do Operating Systems Matter? Part 1

Filed under
Misc

A month or two back, I had a conversation with a vendor who I won't name here (given that I'm at VMWorld, I should probably say that it wasn't VMWare) on the subject of application and service provisioning via a grid type application.

The Perfect Setup - OpenVZ with CentOS 4.4

Filed under
HowTos

This article describes how to prepare a CentOS 4.4 server for OpenVZ virtual machines. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers.

http://www.howtoforge.com/openvz_centos4.4

The Secret of Firefox's Success

Filed under
Moz/FF

"A lot of people don't even know what a browser is," said Firefox co-creator Blake Ross. "They think that it's the first thing they use on the Internet. They say, 'What do you mean browser, is that Google? Is that Yahoo?' It's hard to get people to switch browsers if they don't understand the concept."

Interview: Mozilla Lighting and OpenOffice.org

Filed under
Interviews

Conducted over the period following OOoCon 2006, where Michael Bemmer, the Engineering Director at Sun Microsystems and in charge of development of OpenOffice.org and StarOffice, presented the OpenOffice.org roadmap, this interview focuses on a particularly interesting element: a Personal Information Manager (PIM) that would work closely with OpenOffice.org.

FSF Compliance Lab Announces New Web Site

Filed under
Web

Yesterday the Free Software Foundation (FSF) Compliance Lab unveiled its updated web site, @ http://www.fsf.org/licensing/. The site aims to help people find the information they need about licenses published by the FSF, such as the GNU General Public License (GPL), and to provide more information about the Lab's work.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu-based Smartphones And Tablets Sound Good, On Paper, But...Do They Make Any Sense?
    As I previously stated in a recent article, I'm a huge fan of Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. It's friendly, reliable, consumes little resources and is largely virus-free.
  • Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ expected to be based on Ubuntu 16.04
    Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ coming soon, to be based on Ubuntu 16.04 and have plenty of new features
  • BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet - The heat is on
    Some investments are financial. Some are emotional. When it comes to Linux on tablets, my motives are mostly of the latter kind. I was super-excited to learn BQ was launching a tablet with Ubuntu, something that I have been waiting for a good solid three years now. We had the phone released last spring, and now there's a tablet. The cycle is almost complete. Now, as you know, I was only mildly pleased with the Ubuntu phone. It is a very neat product, but it is not yet as good as the competitors, across all shades of the usability spectrum. But this tablet promises a lot. Full HD, desktop-touch continuum, seamless usage model, and more. Let us have a look.
  • Kubuntu-16.04 — a review
    The kubuntu implementation of Plasma 5 seems to work quite well. It’s close to what I am seeing in other implementations. It includes the Libre Office software, rather than the KDE office suite. But most users will prefer that anyway. I’m not a big fan of the default menu. But the menu can easily be switched to one of the alternative forms. I’ve already done that, and am preferring the “launcher based on cascading popup menus”. If you are trying kubuntu, I suggest you experiment with the alternative formats to see which you prefer.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review: Very Stable & Improved, Buggy Software Center, Though
    In almost all the occasions that I tested Ubuntu LTS releases, quite rightly so, they’ve always worked better than the non-LTS releases. And this Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the 6th of such release is no exception. This one actually is even more impressive than the others because it has addressed some security related issues and even although not critical, subtle issues that I mentioned in the review. As far as the performance was concerned, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was only largely outperformed by the memory usage where there is a large increase in memory usage. Other than that, those numbers look pretty good to me. That ‘.deb’ file issues with the Software Center is the only major concern that I can come up with. But I’m sure it’ll be fixed very soon.

Devuan Beta, Stumbling Tumbleweed, Ubuntu Too

Today in Linux news Debian-fork Devuan is forging ahead with its plans to create a distribution offering init freedom by releasing a beta for testers. Douglas DeMaio posted today that openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have halted due to glibc upgrade rebuilds. Dedoimedo reviewed the BQ Aquaris M10 and liliputing.com posted of another Ubuntu laptop for sale. And finally, the Hectic Geek reviewed Ubuntu 16.04 and Neil Rickert reviewed Kubuntu 16.04. Read more Also: Devuan releases beta Devuan Jessie - beta release announcement

Devuan Jessie beta released

dear Init Freedom Lovers, once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you. As promised two years ago with the first declaration of Exodus from Debian, today we can proudly state: we do not go gentle into that good night. Now has come the time to announce the Beta release of Devuan. Debian GNU+Linux is a fork of Debian without systemd, on its way to become much more than that. This Beta release marks an important milestone towards the sustainability and the continuation of Devuan as an universal base distribution. Read more Also: Beta Released Of Devuan, The Systemd-Free Version Of Debian

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