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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Systemd Development Skyrocketed This Year Rianne Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 10:49pm
Story Ringing in 2015 with 40 Linux-friendly hacker SBCs Rianne Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 10:45pm
Story Purism Librem 15 Rianne Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 10:35pm
Blog entry My Chromebook with KDE Rianne Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 8:02pm
Story Linux Deepin 2014.2 Makes It Out Just In Time For The New Year Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 5:02pm
Story Mesa Crosses 1.5 Million Lines Of Code, Highest Activity Since 2011 Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 4:56pm
Story Desktop Linux and Open Source in 2014: Looking Back Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 4:50pm
Story Windows Phone Replaced with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS on Lumia 1020 Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 10:48am
Story Anonabox Gets Kicked from Kickstarter, Shows Up on Indiegogo with Updated Specs Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 10:44am
Story The Best Linux Software Roy Schestowitz 31/12/2014 - 10:40am

Linux 2.6.28 Kernel Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The Linux 2.6.28 kernel was released this past week in time for the holidays. This quarterly update to the Linux kernel brought the stabilization of the EXT4 file-system, the Graphics Execution Manager, a host of new drivers, and a variety of other updates. For some weekend benchmarking we had tested the latest Linux 2.6.28 kernel.

Linux vs Windows . . . TomTom GPS

Filed under
Software

tycheent.wordpress: My wife gifted me with a TomTom ONE 125 GPS navigator. On charging it up and connecting it to my computer, I discovered that Microsoft had struck again.

What is a Window Manager

Filed under
HowTos

computingtech.blogspot: X-windows is a system that divides the labor up quite a bit. An X-windows application draws and controls only the area "inside" the window, the so-called client area. A totally separate program, called a "window manager" paints the borders and controls (such as resizing edges, maximize, minimize, and close buttons).

Why Current Linux-Preinstalls Pose Adoption Problems for Netbook Users

Filed under
Linux

molkentin.de/blog: This christmas, Santa brought an Acer Aspire One (A110L) for my mother, a not so techy person. It's supposed to be simple and useful. And at first glance, that's true: It comes with Firefox, OpenOffice, etc. Unfortunately, there is also a downside.

Novell Calls Off BrainShare 2009

Filed under
SUSE

linuxinsider.com: Novell Inc. said Wednesday it has canceled its 2009 BrainShare, the annual conference that this year drew 5,500 to the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City.

My Tribe - An enjoyable resource management game for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

linuxhelp.blogspot: My Tribe is the latest game from Grubby Games - the creators of Prof Fizzwizzle and Fizzball. Grubby Games are known for releasing Linux versions of all their games. My Tribe game also has a Linux version. The first time I started playing the My Tribe game, I was taken in by its vivid graphics.

A Linux Christmas Carol explained

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: On Christmas Eve I suggested what "Jingle Bells" may look like if it were a Linux shell script. Here it is for those who missed out, and some interpretation for those who didn't.

Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop Customization Guide

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: Because many people complained a lot about the looks of the new Ubuntu OS and other major Linux distributions, and how they wanted a more eye-candy, professional desktop, we thought that the following tutorial would be a nice Christmas Gift for all of you Linux enthusiasts out there.

OpenSUSE 11.1

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SUSE

valdyas.org: I thought it'd be a tolerably good idea to celebrate boxing day with installing OpenSUSE 11.1. After all, given that this laptop is a Thinkpad X61t with built-in tablet, installing a new version of any distribution tends to be interesting.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Is Windows 7 Really A Linux Killer?

  • atool: handling archives without headaches
  • The NetSlave Quiz - Unix And Linux Humor
  • Contributing to a Project with a Maintainer Who Doesn't Merge Contributions Quickly
  • VLC Christmas Easter Egg
  • RedHat’s new oVirt virtualization host looks promising
  • cpio - copy files to and from archives
  • How to install NetBeans 6.5 on Ubuntu Linux desktop edition

DSL vs Puppy Linux

Filed under
Linux

aronzak.wordpress: Today, in Ken Hess’s Linux Blog, the top 10 Distrowatch distros are listed as ones to try out by downloading and burning them to disc or virtualising. What annoys me is that Damn Small Linux (abbreviated DSL because it’s a bad name) got into that list, but not Puppy Linux. Why?

passing between years

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: The calendar in my Plasma panel says that soon we will have gone through all the days allocated for 2008 and will start in on 2009. While a rather arbitrary line in time, calendar year-ends are a convenient time to look both back and forward. KDE sits between two great years in its history and therefore there is much one can reflect upon as well as look forward to.

An exclusive interview with Martin Nordholts (of GIMP)

Filed under
Interviews

jcornuz.wordpress: For a long time I wanted to do an interview with one of the GIMP developers. Then I came across Martin Nordholts (aka enselic) website. I decided he was the man and bugged him for an interview.

Obligatory Year-End Positive Linux Predictions

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Linux

linuxhaxor.net: Almost every year end, most blogs - magazines - publications and so called “Linux gurus” makes mostly positive predictions about the future of Linux and it’s market share. Following this tradition, it’s only fair that I too share with you my Linux predictions for 2009.

The Definitive Guide to Open Source Hardware - 2008

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Hardware

googlelunarxprize.com: Again this year MAKE Magazine blog has publishes the annual Open Source Hardware Guide listing no less than 60 open source hardware projects, ranging from simple microcontroller boards to a fully functional cell phone. Open source hardware are projects where the designers have decided to publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files necessary to recreate the hardware.

The Internet is the tree, open source the fruit

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: One of the big journalistic trends of 2008 was to call every new Internet paradigm open source. This was both a compliment and a warning.

Quick Thoughts on Amarok 2.0

Filed under
Software

jintoreedwine.wordpress: I was very pleased to hear that Amarok 2.0 had finally been released and I have been awaiting it for some time now. I had heard stories of people not liking the new interface, but I didn’t have much of an opinion on it because I hadn’t used it.

Win to Mac – Why not move to Linux?

Filed under
OS

mac.blorge.com: We are documenting the move of a business user from the Windows platform on a PC to the OS X platform on a Mac. Why would such a user move to the Mac and not to Linux?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu 4GB Ram Limitation and Solution

  • migrate ext3 > ext4
  • How to get your iRiver E100 working nicely in Linux
  • Ubuntu Desktop Effects : Composite not available
  • Instructing APT to not consider recommends packages as strict dependecies
  • The Debian Package Management System
  • Desktop Resources
  • How To Backup Gmail In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Menage Skype and Facebook with Pidgin
  • How to install VMware Tools - Tutorial
  • Banish your daemons for a faster Linux PC
  • Cropping Images using GIMP
  • Using .htaccess for password protecting web directory

Sid Or Sidux?

Filed under
Linux

tuxicity.wordpress: Sidux is based on the unstable branche of Debian, better known as Sid. I decided to give it a go and see if its a good idea to use Sidux in stead of Sid.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
  •  
  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]

France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a proposal to address this problem that may be of interest to our community, to make manufacturers liable for the security of a product while it is on the market, and with the possibility of requiring its software to be made open-source at end-of-life. In the first instance it can only be a good thing for device security to be put at the top of a manufacturer’s agenda, and in the second the ready availability of source code would present reverse engineers with a bonanza. Read more

today's howtos