Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Eight Ways VARs Can Profit From Linux And Open Source

Filed under
OSS
  • Eight Ways VARs Can Profit From Linux And Open Source

  • Microsoft claims heart beats in open source
  • Blizzard Asks Judge to Forbid Open Source
  • The best place to host your open-source project
  • Signature Devices Launches Open Source Game Engine

Launchy Application Launcher Released for Linux

Filed under
Software
  • Launchy Application Launcher Released for Linux

  • GNOME Do vs Launchy

5 Reasons to Choose Debian Linux Over Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Linux

internetling.com: For those rare people who don’t know, Canonical’s Ubuntu distribution is basically Debian Sid (the unstable version) plus a few GUI apps and modifications. Debian is one of the most successful community-based distributions. Here are some reasons to choose Debian over Ubuntu:

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Lighttpd Drupal CMS Clean URL

  • Connecting Ubuntu Linux to a Windows server
  • Bridging VirtualBox 1.6.2 on Ubuntu 8.04.1
  • 100 Vim commands every programmer should know
  • hotplug - Dynamic Hardware Configuration
  • Install KDE 4.1 in Ubuntu, and Make GTK Applications Look Good
  • Reduce Disk Activity In Ubuntu
  • Getting Atheros drivers working in OpenSUSE
  • Get to know the Linux Logical Volume Manager

Is Microsoft getting ready to kill Windows?

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: No, I’m not talking about killing Vista. Microsoft is already burying that living dead operating system as fast it can. I’m talking about killing Windows itself. That’s the conclusion I’ve drawn from David Worthington’s story about Microsoft’s plans for Midori, a next generation operating system.

8 Best E-mail Clients for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: When it comes to picking the right e-mail client, Linux users have tons of choices. I have here a list of 8 of the best free and open source e-mail clients that are available for Linux.

SSD vs. SATA RAID: A performance benchmark

Filed under
Hardware

linux.com: Solid state drives (SSD) have many advantages over traditional spinning-platter hard drives including no noise, low power and heat generation, good resistance to shock, and most importantly, extremely low seek times. To see just how much an SSD might improve performance, I used Bonnie++ to benchmark a contemporary SSD as it might be used in a laptop computer.

Ars reviews Firefox 3.1 alpha 1

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla took a big step towards Firefox 3.1 yesterday with the release of the first alpha. It includes important improvements to both the user interface and to Firefox's underlying Gecko rendering engine.

NVIDIA 173.14.12 Linux Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Yesterday KDE 4.1 was released and there are widely known 2D performance problems with the GeForce 8 and 9 series, which are especially exhibited when using the K Desktop Environment. So you think NVIDIA would address this issue in their next driver update? Guess again.

Ex-inmates apply open source to rehabilitation

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

linuxworld.com: Ric Moore and Dennis Gaddy met in prison, and started to discuss how Open Source software and methods could help other inmates to avoid further mistakes and get better chance to start over after their term. In this interview, Ric explains how they are doing it through the NuOAR program and why.

10 Cool Open Source Easter Eggs

Filed under
Software

hehe2.net: It’s easy to forget with all the source compiling, the conspiracy theories, and the OS flaming going on in every corner of the Internet, that there is a fun side of our beloved OS and Open Source applications. I have compiled a list of 10 easter eggs found in Open Source projects.

Help Create the Artwork for openSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Now with openSUSE 11.0 out the door, and Alpha 1 of openSUSE 11.1 just released, it’s time to start thinking about the look of openSUSE 11.1! Once again this year the Pixel Pool is open for community members to submit ideas about the 11.1 artwork!

Who will build the open source cloud?

Filed under
Software

Matthew Aslett: I wrote recently about the potential of open source software as a platform for cloud computing. Since then I’ve been involved in a couple of conversations with prospective cloud users that have further highlighted the opportunity for an open source cloud.

Lancelot alpha 2 screenshots

Filed under
KDE

ivan.fomentgroup.org: Vijay Patil asked me to explain the application browsing component, so here it is: At first, you get a panel with two columns - Favourites on the left, and application categories on the right.

Hidden Linux : New Compiz Effects

Filed under
Software

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: I've long been a fan of Compiz desktop candy (see here and here), so when I saw version 0.7.6 had been released I rushed to install it. Here's some comparative shots..

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • South African sister companies praise Linux-based accounting program

  • Firefox 3 uses less RAM than earlier versions
  • Have Your Ammo Ready With OpenOffice
  • Is Open Solaris in Hot Water? -- No, I Don't Think So
  • KDE 4.1 delivers a next-gen desktop Linux experience
  • OpenSUSE 11 Alpha 1 with KDE 4.1
  • Furius ISO Mount - Gui tool to mount ISO & image files in openSUSE
  • OS X, Ubuntu and Other Fun Stuff
  • Launchpad 2.0 Radically Improves Collaboration
  • Are India and China taking over open source?
  • Mozilla Developer News July 29
  • Control, transparency, and customer contributions to open source
  • Plumbers Conference Featured Speakers Announcement

Microsoft, its time to officially rescind the Linux lawsuit threats

Filed under
Microsoft

networkworld.com: At this point in the game, Microsoft should really come clean with a statement that rescinds its Linux/patent/suing threat altogether. The fact is, we are seeing actions by Microsoft that indicate that the "suing Linux users" jig is up.

Also: Microsoft: still a business of threats?

Kernel space: no shortage of tracing options

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Three weeks ago, LWN looked at the renewed interest in dynamic tracing, with an emphasis on SystemTap. Tracing is a perennial presence on end-user wishlists; it remains a handy tool for companies like Sun Microsystems, which wish to show that their offerings (Solaris, for example) are superior to Linux. It is not surprising that there is a lot of interest in tracing implementations for Linux.

Also: 2.6.27-rc1, "Pretty Dang Busy"

some images:

Filed under
OSS
  • Linux T-Shirt Statistics Graph

  • Longest Error Ever
  • Mozilla Community
  • The Mozilla Tree

KDE 4.1 still isn't for me

Filed under
KDE

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: A new version of one of the two major Linux desktops, KDE and GNOME, came out today: KDE 4.1 While I don't hate it, I don't see myself switching over from KDE 3.5.9 either. That said, I will say KDE 4.1 is an improvement over the last 4.x version.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more