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Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fuduntu 14.10: An interview with Andrew Wyatt 'Fewt' srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 5:10pm
Story My top 5 media players for Ubuntu srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 5:08pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:52am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:43am
Story What's This “…And the Rest” Crap!?! srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:37am
Story Security of GNU/Linux Systems srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:36am
Story Peppermint OS Two review srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:14am
Story 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 28: My Five Biggest Ubuntu Linux Complaints srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:11am
Story Xamarin Joy Factory srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:18am
Story Book Review: The Book of Audacity srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:17am

Open Source Means You Have to Be Better

Filed under
OSS

If you don't trust your customers and have to treat them like criminals and have to continually tighten the screws, if you have to keep everything a big secret, perhaps the problem is not them derned defective customers, but your approach to running a business.

The quest for a nice Gnome audio burning app

Filed under
Software

With a new version of Mandriva, 2007.1 Spring edition, coming out soon, I decided to take a look at the choice of default applications installed. One of the things a lot of people agreed about, was that the program gcdmaster (a front-end for cdrdao), probably was not the best choice as an audio burning application. For data CD and DVD burning, there is nautilus-cd-burner, but what would be the best choice for music CDs?

Joe Barr rips proprietary software vendor a new one

Filed under
OSS

It seems to be a trend among some proprietary software vendors: attacking open source with lies. The latest appears in this week's Network World's Face-off, which features a slop-bucket full of self-serving hogwash by Ipswitch's Roger Greene entitled "Don't trust your network to open source." If ignorance were a crime, Greene would be swinging from the gallows.

Hans Reiser to Stand Trial for Murder

Filed under
Reiser

Alameda County Superior Court Judge Julie Conger said Friday afternoon that there is sufficient evidence to order Oakland software developer Hans Reiser to stand trial on charges that he murdered his wife, Nina Reiser, last year.

California Bill Makes XML-based Documentation a Requirement for State Agencies

Filed under
OSS

Originally, reports stated that bill AB 1668 would require state agencies to use the open document format (ODF) spearheaded by the group responsible for OpenOffice, but this is not true.

Set up Logical Volume Manager in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

You can use the Logical Volume Manager (LVM) in Linux to create virtual drives, and when used with RAID, LVM provides redundancy. Vincent Danen's tip will show you how to create your first volume.

The preliminary hearing for Hans Reiser scheduled to resume this morning

Filed under
Reiser

The preliminary hearing for an Oakland man accused in the murder of his wife is set to continue this morning (9:00). A judge will decide whether there's enough evidence to try Hans Reiser for the murder of Nina Reiser.

Useful Commands For The Linux Command Line

Filed under
HowTos

This short guide shows some important commands for your daily work on the Linux command line. Some include arch, cat, cp, date, and df.

K3b enters new era with approaching 1.0 release

Filed under
Software

One of free software's premier applications, KDE's CD and DVD burning suite K3b, is about to hit the big 1-0. This milestone touts rewritten DVD video ripping and a refocused interface design. The new release represents a level of feature-completeness and stability that surpasses all previous K3b releases and, perhaps, all free software competitors.

Understanding your Linux daemons

Filed under
HowTos

A Unix daemon is a program that runs in the “background,” enabling you to do other work in the “foreground,” and is independent of control from a terminal. Daemons can either be started by a process, such as a system startup script, where there is no controlling terminal, or by a user at a terminal without “tying up” that terminal as the daemon runs. But which daemons can you safely play with? Which should you leave running?

Open source becomes political wedge issue

Filed under
OSS

Last year, in Massachusetts, we saw open source being used as a political football. But the underlying issue in that case was technological, the state's adoption of ODF as a standard format. Now, in England, we're again seeing open source being used by politicians.

Using truecrypt-intaller to help install Truecrypt for Debian

Filed under
HowTos

Truecrypt is an Open Source disk encryption software which uses a concept of containers to store encrypted data. The nice thing about Truecrypt is that the containers (or volumes) can be read transparently under Linux and Windows. Here are step by step instructions how to use the truecrypt-installer utilities to get Truecrypt running with minimum of effort.

Use the “CUBE” with XGL and Compiz on your Suse Laptop

Filed under
HowTos

I got my laptop on Friday two weeks ago. One of the first things I did was partition the drive, and install OpenSuse 10.2, 64bit version. The installation went smoothly and everything (including WLAN) worked perfect. In this workshop I want to explain the installation of the 3D cube using XGL and Compiz.

FAA Ponders Switch to Linux, Premier Apps

Filed under
Linux

Growing consumer disappointment with Windows Vista, coupled with the need of major businesses and government agencies to begin assessing long-term computing needs, seems to be forcing IT professionals to consider non-Microsoft alternatives for their operating system and office suite applications.

Remote kernal debugging in FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

Explore how to remotely debug a FreeBSD kernel that is running on a target machine without affecting system performance. In this article, examine setting up the debug environment using serial communication port, compiling modified kernel code, debugging, and troubleshooting tips.

Linux dominating the desktop…an impossible dream?

Filed under
Linux

I’m starting to think that I have to agree with Paul Thurrott: this year will not be the “Year of Desktop Linux”…again. While some people have some idea that Linux has the tools to do as such today, a better example to compare to is probably Apple’s OS X. OS X has all the tools to rapidly and easily take over the desktop world. But like Paul Thurrott quoted, OS X market share is between 2.5% and 4%.

Linux server shipments shrink as enterprises consolidate, virtualize data centers

Filed under
Linux

Linux server revenue grew slightly in the fourth quarter of 2006, according to the latest research from IDC. But while overall Linux usage is growing, the number of physical Linux servers being shipped to enterprises may be suffering due to the trend of virtualization.

Management 'scared' by open source

Filed under
OSS

Fear is stalking the corridors of corporate power, as executives sweat over the legal exposure caused by developers using open source software. And the suits are resorting to play-it-safe legal advice and draconian management techniques in a vain attempt to stop open source crossing their frontier.

Using Cscope and SilentBob to analyze source code

Filed under
HowTos

When you start learning the source code of an unfamiliar project, you don't have the knowledge of its structure or the meaning of specific functions, classes, and units in the project. You can use tags to browse for definitions, but it's hard to get an overall picture by just looking through every definition one by one. Cscope and SilentBob are two tools that can help you analyze unfamiliar source code.

PCLinuxOS 2007 (beta 2) - Review

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

I have used PCLinuxOS since version .8 and have always found it easy to use and aesthetically appealing. Being based on Mandriva might help PCLinuxOS' cause as Mandriva has been and continues to be a system new Linux users can migrate to with little to no learning curve.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • OpenVZ 7.0 Becomes A Complete Linux Distribution, Based On VzLinux
    OpenVZ, a long-standing Linux virtualization technology and similar to LXC and Solaris Containers, is out with their major 7.0 release. OpenVZ 7.0 has focused on merging the OpenVZ and Virtuozzo code-bases along with replacing their own hypervisor with that of Linux's KVM. Under OpenVZ 7.0, it has become a complete Linux distribution based upon VzLinux.
  • OpenVZ 7.0 released
    I’m pleased to announce the release of OpenVZ 7.0. The new release focuses on merging OpenVZ and Virtuozzo source codebase, replacing our own hypervisor with KVM.
  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.4.0 beta 2
    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.
  • FreeIPA Lightweight CA internals
    In the preceding post, I explained the use cases for the FreeIPA lightweight sub-CAs feature, how to manage CAs and use them to issue certificates, and current limitations. In this post I detail some of the internals of how the feature works, including how signing keys are distributed to replicas, and how sub-CA certificate renewal works. I conclude with a brief retrospective on delivering the feature.
  • Lightweight Sub-CAs in FreeIPA 4.4
    Last year FreeIPA 4.2 brought us some great new certificate management features, including custom certificate profiles and user certificates. The upcoming FreeIPA 4.4 release builds upon this groundwork and introduces lightweight sub-CAs, a feature that lets admins to mint new CAs under the main FreeIPA CA and allows certificates for different purposes to be issued in different certificate domains. In this post I will review the use cases and demonstrate the process of creating, managing and issuing certificates from sub-CAs. (A follow-up post will detail some of the mechanisms that operate behind the scenes to make the feature work.)
  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.200.2.0
    The second Armadillo release of the 7.* series came out a few weeks ago: version 7.200.2. And RcppArmadillo version 0.7.200.2.0 is now on CRAN and uploaded to Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now over 240 packages using it. For once, I let it simmer a little preparing only a package update via the GitHub repo without preparing a CRAN upload to lower the update frequency a little. Seeing that Conrad has started to release 7.300.0 tarballs, the time for a (final) 7.200.2 upload was now right. Just like the previous, it now requires a recent enough compiler. As g++ is so common, we explicitly test for version 4.6 or newer. So if you happen to be on an older RHEL or CentOS release, you may need to get yourself a more modern compiler. R on Windows is now at 4.9.3 which is decent (yet stable) choice; the 4.8 series of g++ will also do. For reference, the current LTS of Ubuntu is at 5.4.0, and we have g++ 6.1 available in Debian testing.

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: Debian

  • Debian LGBTIQA+
    I have a long overdue blog entry about what happened in recent times. People that follow my tweets did catch some things. Most noteworthy there was the Trans*Inter*Congress in Munich at the start of May. It was an absolute blast. I met so many nice and great people, talked and experienced so many great things there that I'm still having a great motivational push from it every time I think back. It was also the time when I realized that I in fact do have body dysphoria even though I thought I'm fine with my body in general: Being tall is a huge issue for me. Realizing that I have a huge issue (yes, pun intended) with my length was quite relieving, even though it doesn't make it go away. It's something that makes passing and transitioning for me harder. I'm well aware that there are tall women, and that there are dedicated shops for lengthy women, but that's not the only thing that I have trouble with. What bothers me most is what people read into tall people: that they are always someone they can lean on for comfort, that tall people are always considered to be self confident and standing up for themselves (another pun, I know ... my bad).
  • [GSOC] Week 8&9 Report
    This particular week has been tiresome as I did catch a cold ;). I did come back from Cape Town where debconf taking place. My arrival at Montreal was in the middle of the week, so this week is not plenty of news…
  • Debian on Jetson TK1
    I became interested in running Debian on NVIDIA's Tegra platform recently. NVIDIA is doing a great job getting support for Tegra upstream (u-boot, kernel, X.org and other projects). As part of ensuring good Debian support for Tegra, I wanted to install Debian on a Jetson TK1, a development board from NVIDIA based on the Tegra K1 chip (Tegra 124), a 32-bit ARM chip.
  • RC bugs 2016/01-29

Android Leftovers