Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Loop-based Music Composition With Linux, Pt. 2

Filed under
Software

Linux Journal: In this second and final part I'll demonstrate some of the loop-specific tools I've found in Ardour, Reaper, and Audacity. Tutorials and links to project demos are included, so warm up your headphones and let's get loopy.

Open Source: TinyMe

Filed under
Linux

fareast.linuxdiary.com: If you are interested in getting that really old machine up and running again, with as little as ~32MB of ram, then there is a shiny new competitor to PuppyLinux and Damn Small Linux: TinyMe.

Desktop tune-up. Four cool Linux tricks

Filed under
Linux

tectonic: Kick-start your week with four easy (but still cool) tricks on your Linux desktop. Install the media server you've always wanted but never got around to doing, or fine-tune your hardware to squeeze out a few more hours of battery power ... All this an more in this week's How To Roundup.

Top Ten Side Effects of Switching to Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux Online: Studies done by a prestigious think tank in Silicon Valley have identified the most common behavioral changes in people who have switched to Linux. They were nice enough to share their information with us.

Portables to power PC industry

Filed under
OLPC

BBC: The XO laptop may have been created to help children in developing nations, but its influence is likely to be felt far beyond the classroom. The PC industry is going to be among the first to feel its impact in November 2007 when, for a week, the gadget goes on sale to almost anyone that wants one.

Windows vs. Ubuntu

Filed under
OS

alatinworld.blogspot: I, for one, am a fan of Windows and Microsoft through and through. The other day, however, I was having computer problems when a technician told me that I should back up everything on my computer because it sounded like my copy of Windows had been damaged.

Cuba's Move Toward Freedom, as in Software

Filed under
OSS

Linux Insider: The Cuban government proclaimed its intention to exchange its computer operating systems for free software in 2005, but the state agencies that are in charge of the switch have done little to make it happen.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • PyMOTW: copy

  • HeX: Full Screen Terminal
  • Howto make Ubuntu to read feeds for you
  • Fixing the Ubuntu Gutsy boot splash issue

Linux and Me, Part 3: Software and Virtualization

Filed under
Linux

carsonspost.wordpress: This is the third post in a series where I examine experience with the Linux Operating System. This post will have a look at the software that I have found available to the Linux user, comparing it to what is available on Windows, and what to do when you need that Windows program but are running Linux.

Why GPLv3 Will Supplant GPLv2

Filed under
OSS

linux journal: Some evidence suggests that GPLv3 uptake is coming along nicely, while other reports indicate a reluctance to adopt it (but note also Matt Asay's neat reconciliation of these contradictory messages). To see what's likely to happen in the long term, it's useful to look back at the past history of licence adoption.

The Novell-Microsoft Wheeler Dealers Speak

Filed under
SUSE

groklaw: Novell is getting money, they claim, market share, although you will note Andy Updegrove challenges that story, pointing out that sales leveled off after the initial spike. But the main takeaway, as they might put it, for me is that this is an anti-Red Hat deal, and Novell is thrilled about that.

Windows vs Linux: Architecture, part II

Filed under
OS

polishlinux: After a boring and dry customary introduction in the previous part of the article, Windows vs Linux: Architecture, part I, I went on to describe problems with Windows system accounts, kernel architectures, system security, and both kernel and user modes. Welcome to the second part of the article.

Preventing Brute Force Attacks With BlockHosts On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

In this article I will show how to install and configure BlockHosts on a Debian Etch system. BlockHosts is a Python tool that observes login attempts to various services, e.g. SSH, FTP, etc., and if it finds failed login attempts again and again from the same IP address or host, it stops further login attempts from that IP address/host.

Mysql Command Lines

Filed under
HowTos

Linux By Example: You extract info from mysql databases easily by execute the command line mysql -e. The results of sql statements can be save into various format of files, such as plain text without ascii table borders (batch mode), html (with table tags, such as td,tr,th) and XML.

Sysfs Stability

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "The fact that we continue to expose internal data structures via sysfs is a gaping open pit [and] is far more likely to cause any kind of problems than changing an error return," Theodore Ts'o noted, responding to a thread discussing a patch to fix an error return code.

Foresight Linux 1.4, A nice green appliance

Filed under
Linux

Foresight is really great for seeing the latest gnome; one can show off the bleeding edge desktop. Foresight also has a great out of box experience. Foresight is having a great theme and is quite user friendly. I would recommend it to every one, coming to me, asking for which Linux to start with.

Minimal Gentoo Installation

Filed under
HowTos

futurepages.net: This artlicle will show you how to install Gentoo OS from a minimal installation CD on your computer. Before proceeding, please ensure that you have the following: A computer infront of you, Available connection to internet, and At least one and a half hours of free time.

GUIDE TO - Installing Ubuntu Linux 7.04 Feisty Fawn on the PS3

Filed under
HowTos

playstation.com: This is a very simple guide that will teach you how to Install Ubuntu linux on the PS3 and to get more out of your powerful system .

Ubuntu Human Theme for Awn

Filed under
Software

the linux movement: Now that I am using Gutsy and a Ubuntu based wallpaper background, I thought I would make a Ubuntu theme for awn and share it with all of you. Its pretty basic but fits in with the Human theme for Ubuntu very well:

Also: Gutsy Desktop effects Choices
And: Clean install with Gutsy....

Man wins damages from Acer over pre-installed XP and software

Filed under
Microsoft

tech.blorge: A French national has won a lawsuit against Acer over a laptop he purchased that came pre-loaded with Windows XP and other software he didn’t want installed.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more