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Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Google pledges 9 month anonymity on data

Filed under
Google

techradar.com: Google has responded to mounting EU pressure on privacy by stating it will 'anonymize' users' IP addresses after nine months.

When Will They Ever Learn?

Filed under
Linux

Glyn Moody: Here's some news from Red Hat: We’ve partnered with Seneca College, one of the leaders in instituting open source software into its coursework, to bring Fedora to the classroom. What's remarkable about this is that Red Hat considers it remarkable. And, sadly, it *is* remarkable.

Ubuntu In Popular Culture

Filed under
Ubuntu

daniel.holba.ch/blog: Yesterday we watched “Berlin am Meer” - not a world-changing, but nice movie which plays in Berlin. I was pleased to see they used Ubuntu in a short scene.

Polishing Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com/faaborg: In an effort to increase the level of Firefox’s visual and interactive polish, I’ll be posting a list of around 7 bugs every monday from now until we finish up Firefox 3.1.

Don't be Afraid of Linux

Filed under
Linux

shoutwire.com: When it comes to dual-booting Linux and Windows, your average computer user will shit himself six ways from Sunday and refuse because he doesn't want to have to learn anything new. Most people are just too damn intimidated by all the geek rhetoric they hear online and honestly just don't want to screw up their machine.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu is really boring me on my desktop

  • Fully Automatic Installation for all distributions
  • More fun X-based stuff
  • Gambas - Almost Visual Basic for Linux
  • Lego-like Linux modules ready to ship
  • Interactive C# Shell
  • A Flurry of Open Source Video-Related News
  • The all new Ubuntu Brainstorm
  • openSUSE Build Service Build Checks
  • Microsoft, Novell Making Virtualization Moves At VMworld
  • No tiling support for KDE 4.2
  • Bill and Jerry, Chrome and the Next Linux Generation
  • Ad danger to open source
  • How pot may win the war against super-bacteria

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel Swear Words

  • Visualizing open source software
  • Linux Outlaws 53 - Duck Porn?!

Review: Acer Aspire One

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Review: Acer Aspire One

  • OLPC's Amazon Notebook Linux Only
  • ASUS Eee PC 901 falls to a cool $500
  • Bootleg videos to blame for Linux MSI Wind delay?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OpenOffice.org: Knowing when to use Impress

  • Improve login time by using readahead in Ubuntu
  • Linux Wi-Fi Works With wicd
  • Use Amarok as An Alarm Clock
  • Configuring IceWM: Basics
  • Linux Performance Hunting Tips - Take Copious Notes (Save Everything)
  • Avoid OpenDNS Free DNS Service Like The Plague
  • Tip: USB key problem on Mandriva
  • DIY File Server
  • Finding Overlapping Matches Using Perl's Lookahead Assertion Matching
  • small Qt based mail biff
  • Expanding text with Snippits in Linux

Ubuntu debuts Jaunty Jackalope

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.com.au: The Ubuntu project has detailed plans for the April 2009 version of its Linux distribution, continuing its habit of naming its software after animals by dubbing Ubuntu 9.04 "The Jaunty Jackalope".

20 reasons to shed the Microsoft yoke and use Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Well, well, well! We seem to be going on a crusade here at iTWire - the old W vs L battle. The Windows is better than Linux creed - which I think is another way of proffering reasons why marketing is better than technology.

Forrester Compares Chicago Cubs Fans To Linux Faithful

Filed under
Misc

crn.com: Last month in a research note on corporate desktop trends, Forrester analyst Ben Gray acknowledged the existence of "fairly impressive industry buzz" on the future of Linux on the desktop, but said Linux still represents a tiny share of the corporate desktop market.

Three typing tutors and a boy

Filed under
Software

linux.com: I recently sat down with my 12-year-old son Ian, who agreed to sit still long enough to try a few typing teacher applications on Ubuntu Hardy Heron. Fortunately, we found a number of open source typing tutorial programs to download and test. Ian and I looked at three GPL-licensed apps: Klavaro, TuxTyping, and KTouch.

Why VIA's Open Source Video Driver Is Missing A Few Things

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com/blog: A scenario for you: A company announces that it's going to offer open source drivers for its hardware from now on. Rejoicing ensues. Then the drivers themselves arrive, only to be missing things -- not enough to make them useless, but still frustrating. What happened?

Upcoming Fedora 10 release foreshadows RHEL 6

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: For Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) administrators, handling software packages, administering policies and managing networks all are going to get easier. At least that's the promise.

Also: Red Hat's Jim Whitehurst: The Challenges of Competing with Free

Sabayon 3.5: Fun, as a Live DVD

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Sabayon has been an interesting distribution in the past. However I've never actually chosen to use the distribution regularly, opting instead to play with the live games from time to time. While searching for a different kind of distribution to throw on Rig 4, Sabayon 3.5 came up.

A First Extraction Of Chromium

Filed under
Google
Software

heise-online.co.uk: Chrome is not Google's new open source browser. Chromium is Google's new open source browser. The initial release and supporting documentation usually hint at how well developed the project will be. With that in mind, heise online UK set out to build Chromium from the available source code and see how difficult the process was.

Heretic and Hexen liberated!

Filed under
Gaming

fsf.org/blogs: After several years of trying, members of the Doom community have succeeded in getting the source code to Heretic and its sequel, Hexen to be re-released as free software under the GNU General Public License.

Lenovo ditches Linux

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: Chinese PC manufacturing giant Lenovo, which years ago purchased IBM's personal computer business, appears to have quietly stopped offering Linux as a pre-installation option.

Linux-powered LinPC desktop is a bargain

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linux.com: The new generation of inexpensive netbooks may be wonderful, but for my main desktop I want a real machine -- something I can open up, clean, and add to. So I was extremely tickled recently to trade for a new LinPC, an economical personal computer that features PCLinuxOS MiniMe 2008 preinstalled and ready to go.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS to VirtualBox

Oracle recently updated their VirtualBox open-source and cross-platform virtualization software with initial support for the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series. VirtualBox 5.2.2 is the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 5.2 stable series of the application, and it looks like it can be compiled and used on GNU/Linux distribution running the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel. It also makes it possible to run distros powered by Linux kernel 4.14 inside VirtualBox VMs. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • How a Linux stronghold turned back to Windows: Key dates in Munich's LiMux project [Ed: This explains the progression of Microsoft's war on GNU/Linux, typically using proxies]
    The project is temporarily put on hold while a study investigates whether it could be derailed by software patents.
  • End of an open source era: Linux pioneer Munich confirms switch to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft paid (bribed) all the right people, got a Microsoft fan -- by his own admission -- in power, gifted him for this]
    Mayor Dieter Reiter said there's never been a unified Linux landscape in the city. "We always had mixed systems and what we have here is the possibility of going over to a single system. Having two operating systems is completely uneconomic.
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E38 – Soft Knowledgeable Burn
    This week we refactor a home network, discuss how gaming on Linux has evolved and grown in recent years, bring you a blend of love and go over your feedback.
  • Live ISOs for Slackware-current 20171122
    I have released an update of the ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I needed the tag for a batch of new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. These are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Wed Nov 22 05:27:06 UTC 2017“) i.e. yesterday and that means, the ISOs are going to boot into the new 4.14.1 kernel.
  • Am I willing to pay the price to support ethical hardware?
    The planned obsolescence is even worse with tablets and smartphones, whose components are all soldered down. The last tablet with a removable battery was the Dell Venue 11 Pro (Haswell version) announced in October 2013, but it was an expensive Windows device that cost as much as a mid-range laptop. The last Android tablet with a removable battery was the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (GT-N8000 series), released in August 2012. It is still possible to find mid-range smartphones with removable batteries. Last year the only high end phones with removable batteries were the LG G5 and V20, but even LG has given up on the idea of making phones that will last longer than 2 years once the battery starts to degrade after roughly 500 full charge and discharge cycles. Every flagship phone introduced in 2017 now has its battery sealed in the case. According to the gmsarena.com database, the number of new smartphone models with non-replaceable batteries grew from 1.9% in 2011 to 26.7% in 2014, and now to 90.3% in 2017. It is highly likely that not a single model of smartphone introduced next year will have a replaceable battery.

More Coverage of New Lumina Release

  • Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Released
    The TrueOS BSD folks working on their Qt5-powered Lumina Desktop Environment have issued a new feature update of their open-source desktop.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.4.0 Released
    Lumina 1.4.0 carries a number of changes, optimisations, and feature improvements. Lumina is the default desktop of TrueOS, a BSD-based operating system. The desktop itself is lightweight, modular, built using Qt, and uses Fluxbox for window management. Although Lumina is mostly aimed at BSD users it also runs on Linux, including Fedora, Arch and — *mario coin sfx* — Ubuntu.