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Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Will the Daylight Savings Shift Do Us Any Good?

Filed under
Misc

It's all in the name of saving energy. At least, that's what we were told. Will it work? Not very likely, say two young economists at the University of California at Berkeley.

How to choose a Linux distribution

Filed under
Linux

Linux. It’s a great operating system, but it’s hard to choose which distribution (which version) you want to use. So, which do you choose? You’re probably expecting me to tell you, right? You’re partially right.

NZB,PAR and UNRAR all-in-one Using Hellanzb

Filed under
HowTos

hellanzb is a Python application designed for *nix environments that retrieves nzb files and fully processes them. The goal being to make getting files from Usenet (e.g.: Giganews Newsgroups) as hands-free as possible.

Sun Opens Darkstar to Win Over Online Game Developers

Filed under
OSS

"By open sourcing Darkstar technology, we will help enable the widest possible market for online game developers and remove their burden of having to build enterprise-grade server solutions, leaving them to do what they do best -- build great game experiences," Chris Melissinos, chief gaming officer at Sun Microsystems, stated.

Ubuntu IRC Etiquette

Filed under
Misc

In the past few month I’ve been bothered by the fact that several folks have been asking for help with file sharing in the #ubuntu-nl channel on the freenode IRC network. I think it’s wrong.

Oh no, Boston Lead Singer Dead at 55

Filed under
Obits

New Hampshire authorities are investigating the death of Boston lead singer Bradley Delp, who was found dead in his home at the age of 55.

Linux makes for greener computing

Filed under
Linux

The UK Government reckons that servers with Linux installed are greener than those running Windows. That's because open source software has lower hardware requirements and needs less frequent hardware refreshes.

Freespire floats first Ubuntu-based alpha

Filed under
Linux

After the recent switch to the Ubuntu code base, Freespire announced that it has restarted its development process with the first alpha release of Freespire 2.0, Alpha1U (1.2.42). The new revision sports a 2.6.20 kernel and the KDE 3.5.6 desktop environment, according to the project team.

write a message to login users through terminal

Filed under
HowTos

To write a message to users that have login, you can using the command write. But before that, you need to check who is login, and which terminal he is login to, use command who.

Last.fm + Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

When I’m coding I MUST listen to music. It helps me tune out and concentrate. Tonight I was messing around on Last.fm and noticed they had a client download and was amazed to see they had a Linux version!

The Next Hurdle for Desktop Linux

Filed under
Linux

We just passed a quiet milestone at the beginning of the month. And while the milestone does not seem to effect Linux, it could be mark the beginning of the worst assault on desktop Linux to date. As of March 1, it seems, all televisions sold in the US are to be HDTV ready.

Top 10 Ubuntu Tips

Filed under
HowTos

1) How to restart GNOME without rebooting computer
A) Press ‘Ctrl + Alt + Backspace’
or
Cool sudo /etc/init.d/gdm restart

Living in the command line, for linux: Making it Possible

Filed under
HowTos

Most Linux distributions install to have 7 virtual consoles, generally #7 (F7) is used by Xorg/X11. Though working entirely from the command line does involve a better knowledge of some things, it can be a quicker and more practical work environment for some who are running commands or scripts or writing programs most of their day.

Expect More Downtime

Filed under
Site News

If you are a regular to tuxmachines, you have probably noticed the unusual amount of downtime the past 18 hours. I've known for several weeks that a change in server system was imminent and it appears I can no longer delay the upgrade. Expect tuxmachines to be down on and off over the next couple of days beginning tonight.

Stable kernel 2.6.20.2 Released

Filed under
Linux

The second stable update to the 2.6.20 kernel is out. "It contains a metric buttload of bugfixes and security updates, so all 2.6.20 users are recommended to upgrade." They are not joking: there's about 100 patches in this update.

More Here.

Firefox Password Flaw Still Open?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Is a flaw in the Firefox browser fixed or not? A security research claims that it's not. Mozilla says it is. Mozilla claimed that it fixed the flaw in its most recent Firefox 2.0.0.2 update. Chapin doesn't quite agree.

Publishing Writer documents on the Web

Filed under
HowTos

Although OpenOffice.org has an HTML/XHTML export feature, it is not up to the snuff when it comes to turning Writer documents into clean HTML files. Instead, this feature turns even the simplest Writer documents into HTML gobbledygook. So what options do you have if you want to convert your Writer documents into tidy HTML pages or wiki-formatted text files?

Open Source Means You Have to Be Better

Filed under
OSS

If you don't trust your customers and have to treat them like criminals and have to continually tighten the screws, if you have to keep everything a big secret, perhaps the problem is not them derned defective customers, but your approach to running a business.

The quest for a nice Gnome audio burning app

Filed under
Software

With a new version of Mandriva, 2007.1 Spring edition, coming out soon, I decided to take a look at the choice of default applications installed. One of the things a lot of people agreed about, was that the program gcdmaster (a front-end for cdrdao), probably was not the best choice as an audio burning application. For data CD and DVD burning, there is nautilus-cd-burner, but what would be the best choice for music CDs?

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More in Tux Machines

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

Proprietary and Microsoft Software

Pithos 1.2

  • New Version of Linux Pandora Client ‘Pithos’ Released
    A new release of open-source Linux Pandora client Pithos is now available for download.
  • Pithos 1.2 Improves The Open-Source/Linux Pandora Desktop Experience
    Chances are if you've ever dealt with Pandora music streaming from the Linux desktop you've encountered Pithos as the main open-source solution that works out quite well. Released today was Pithos 1.2 and it ships with numerous enhancements for this GPLv3-licensed Pandora desktop client. Pithos 1.2 adds a number of new keyboard shortcuts for the main window, initial support for translations, an explicit content filter option, reduced CPU usage with Ubuntu's default theme, redesigned dialogs and other UI elements, and more.