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Tuesday, 19 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 8:55pm
Story More Intel DRM Improvements Aimed For Linux 3.17 Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 8:50pm
Story KDE Ships July Updates and Second Beta of Applications and Platform 4.14 Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 8:36pm
Story Raspberry Pi 3D full-body scanner interview Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 8:16pm
Story CRUX 3.1 Distro Is for Linux Aficionados Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 3:59pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 1:15pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 1:13pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 1:12pm
Story OpenELEC 4.2 Beta 1 Is Now Based on XBMC “Gotham” 13.2 Beta 1 and Linux Kernel 3.15 Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 1:05pm
Story Avoid the Android vampire apps Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2014 - 12:58pm

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Disable Login and Logout Sound on Ubuntu

  • tweeting from the command line
  • Replacing Openoffice Splash Screen
  • Bypass School Internet Filters
  • View A Package Changelog Entry With Aptitude or Synaptic
  • Configuring Debian for UTF-8

From Windows to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

billhiggins.us/weblog: Chief among these “things I’d like to change when I have the time” was my use of Windows XP as my operating system. So I downloaded a Ubuntu ISO CD image, burned that, backed up my data, then formatted my hard drive and installed Linux.

Ubuntu Hardy Heron on a Mac Mini

Filed under
Ubuntu

rfdlinux.wordpress: My broadband connection was barely 24 hours old when work began on migrating to the latest version of Ubuntu. Hardy Heron, as it’s called, is very nice on the Mini. What follows is how I did it, what I used, what worked, and what didn’t.

Pardus 2008 : A testdrive

Filed under
Linux

wamukota.blogspot: A few weeks ago I was asked to testdrive Pardus - a distro of Turkish origin. It was released on june 27 and here is my report on this distro.

The 'killer' linux ....Ships AHOY!

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Everyone uses the "car" analogy. Expecting Linux to someday ZOOM ahead of the pack and leave the likes of MS and Apple in the dust on the track. This mental approach doesn't always do it for people and they get discouraged because of the mindset like that they walked in with.

The popular emergence of apt-git?

Filed under
Software

jldugger.livejournal: It's no secret that Canonical is a large proponent of Bazaar (bzr) and would like to use Ubuntu as a guinea pig for large scale deployments. At UDS Prague, James Westby gave an interview about using "distributed version control systems" (DVCS) for coordinating development. The interviewer is a bit confused about how the Ubuntu flavors interact, so I think an explanation of DVCS and Ubuntu development is in order.

Why Ubuntu's LTS releases are inferior to Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Filed under
Linux

utoronto.ca/blog: It's time to update my view of Ubuntu with my most recent set of feelings. Well, with why I feel my most recent set of feelings, which is that Ubuntu LTS is significantly inferior to Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Free as in Beer

Filed under
OSS

sharplinux.blogspot: As I mentioned in my last Independence Day post, most free software is free in the monetary sense of the word. One of Richard Stallman's memorable and concise ways of making the "free" distinction is to say "think free speech, not free beer." The problem with the term "free software" seems to be that many users can't think past the "free-as-in-beer" quality.

Two great time-saving tips for Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

techspot.com/blog: Firefox is by far the most used alternative browser. I believe that comes in part thanks to its flexibility for customization and the myriad of useful add-ons you can get for it. My following tips, however, lay on the side of about:config tweaks.

How I got over the hurdles to migrate from XP to Kubuntu 8.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

agileskills2.org/blog: I find that Kubuntu needs a few critical tweaks before it is useable by end users, in particular, in the CJK market. Such tweaks are not very well documented and take quite some serious research efforts, even for an experienced Linux/Ubuntu server administrator.

List of FTP Clients Available for Linux

Filed under
Software

debianadmin.com: FTP is a file transfer protocol for exchanging files over any TCP/IP based network to manipulate files on another computer on that network. There are many existing FTP client and server programs.

The Perfect Desktop - OpenSUSE 11 (GNOME)

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an OpenSUSE 11 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Sabayon Linux - 3rd Party Software [Howto]

  • Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) Alpha 1 Screenshots
  • Ask Linux.com: Specialty distros, startup scripts, and a whole new forum
  • Intel Driver Gets XvMC Improvements
  • List of Linux magazines
  • OpenSUSE 11.0 Periodic KDE Freeze
  • Ubuntu Hardy gets Sweeter with Sugar!
  • Ubuntu
  • OLPC donates 5,000 laptops to Ethiopian schools
  • Gentoo on the iBook G4
  • recording GNU/Linux games with glc
  • NETGEAR Launches Open Source WGR614L Wireless-G Router
  • file: classify unknown files on the console
  • Listen Last.fm music in linux with Last.fm player or Vagalume

KDE: It’s time for a fork

Filed under
KDE

practical-tech.com: OK, I’ve now tried KDE 4.1. I’d been assured that it would be better than KDE 4.0x. It is. That’s the good news. The bad news is that I still find KDE 4.1 to be inferior to KDE 3.5x. KDE’s developers believe that KDE 4.1 “can fully replace KDE 3 for end users.” I don’t see it.

Ubuntu Hardy Heron is Unstable

Filed under
Ubuntu

opencomputing.blogspot: I've been running Hardy now for quite a while, and I've come to the conclusion that it isn't stable. I will probably be downgrading to Gutsy very soon, however much I dislike the idea of doing so. To me, downgrading doesn't feel like I'm being part of the solution, but rather that I'm just bypassing the problem.

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ndiswrapper in Slackware

  • The ‘end task’ procedure for Linux
  • How-To: Set up a LAN gateway with DHCP, Dynamic DNS and iptables on Debian Etch
  • How I Put Everex in Kiosk Mode
  • LXDE - Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment for Ubuntu
  • Howto Setup a DLINK WUA-2340 USB Wireless Adapter in Ubuntu Hardy
  • Smart on openSUSE 11.0
  • Howto install Ruby Enterprise Edition on Ubuntu or Debian
  • Fast Perl HTML POD Creation On Linux and Unix

Linux Mint 5

Filed under
Linux

odysseus.wordpress: My Linux evolution went from Linspire to Mepis to PCLinuxOS to Ubuntu. I stayed with PCLinuxOS and Ubuntu for the longest. However, I have always read good things about another distribution called Linux Mint. So, I downloaded the latest iso and tried it out to see how it all worked.

Open-Source Reshaping the Software Industry

Filed under
Moz/FF

epochtimes.com: People in the industry foresee a time in which for many people, the only thing they'll need on a computer is a browser. The browser is just extraordinarily strategic.

People of openSUSE: Jan-Simon Möller

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: Weekly News writer and openSUSE member Jan-Simon Möller accepted ‘People of openSUSE’ interview request and shared with us some information about himself. Jan is also the maintainer of the hamradio repository on the Build Service.

The state of WoW on Linux

Filed under
Gaming

wowinsider.com: During the dev panel a few minutes ago, Tom Chilton told us something interesting about playing World of Warcraft on the Linux platform -- Blizzard has actually had it working.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle: New VirtualBox 5.2 Beta, SPARC M8 Processors Launched

  • VirtualBox 5.2 to Let Users Enable or Disable Audio Input and Output On-the-Fly
    Oracle announced new updates for its popular, cross-platform and open-source virtualization software, the third Beta of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.2 major release and VirtualBox 5.1.28 stable maintenance update. We'll start with the stable update, VirtualBox 5.1.28, as it's more important for our readers using Oracle VM VirtualBox for all of their virtualization needs. The VirtualBox 5.1 maintenance release 28 is here to improve audio support by fixing various issues with both the ALSA and OSS backends, as well as an accidental crash with AC'97.
  • SPARC M8 Processors Launched
    While Oracle recently let go of some of their SPARC team, today marks the launch of the SPARC M8. The initial SPARC M8 line-up includes the T8-1, T8-2, T8-4. M8-8, and SuperCluster M8-8 servers.

Wikileaks Releases Spy Files Russia, CCleaner Infected, Equifax Has a Dirty Little Secret

  • Spy Files Russia
    This publication continues WikiLeaks' Spy Files series with releases about surveillance contractors in Russia. While the surveillance of communication traffic is a global phenomena, the legal and technological framework of its operation is different for each country. Russia's laws - especially the new Yarovaya Law - make literally no distinction between Lawful Interception and mass surveillance by state intelligence authorities (SIAs) without court orders. Russian communication providers are required by Russian law to install the so-called SORM ( Система Оперативно-Розыскных Мероприятий) components for surveillance provided by the FSB at their own expense. The SORM infrastructure is developed and deployed in Russia with close cooperation between the FSB, the Interior Ministry of Russia and Russian surveillance contractors.
  • Malware-Infected CCleaner Installer Distributed to Users Via Official Servers for a Month
    Hackers have managed to embed malware into the installer of CCleaner, a popular Windows system optimization tool with over 2 billion downloads to date. The rogue package was distributed through official channels for almost a month. CCleaner is a utilities program that is used to delete temporary internet files such as cookies, empty the Recycling Bin, correct problems with the Windows Registry, among other tasks. First released in 2003, it has become hugely popular; up to 20 million people download it per month. Users who downloaded and installed CCleaner or CCleaner Cloud between Aug. 15 and Sept. 12 should scan their computers for malware and update their apps. The 32-bit versions of CCleaner v5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud v1.07.3191 were affected.
  • Equifax Suffered a Hack [sic] Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed
  • This is why you shouldn’t use texts for two-factor authentication

    For a long time, security experts have warned that text messages are vulnerable to hijacking — and this morning, they showed what it looks like in practice.

Amazon Changes Rental ('Cloud') Model on GNU/Linux

Devices/Hardware: Embedded/Boards, CODESYS, and EPYC Linux Performance

  • Linux friendly IoT gateway runs on 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC
    While the MB-80580 SBC lists SATA II, the gateway indicates SATA III. Also, the gateway datasheet notes that the RS232 ports can all be redirected to RS232/422/485. Software includes Windows IoT Core and Server, as well as Yocto, Ubuntu Snappy Core, and CentOS Linux distributions.
  • Rugged panel PC scales up to a 19-inch touchscreen
    The fanless, IP65-rated WinSystems “PPC65B-1x” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 10.4 to 19-inch resistive touchscreens.
  • CODESYS announces CODESYS-compatible SoftPLC for open Linux device platforms
  • EPYC Linux performance from AMD
    Phoronix have been hard at work testing out AMD's new server chip, specifically the 2.2/2.7/3.2GHz EPYC 7601 with 32 physical cores.  The frequency numbers now have a third member which is the top frequency all 32 cores can hit simultaneously, for this processor that would be 2.7GHz.  Benchmarking server processors is somewhat different from testing consumer CPUs, gaming performance is not as important as dealing with specific productivity applications.   Phoronix started their testing of EPYC, in both NUMA and non-NUMA configurations, comparing against several Xeon models and the performance delta is quite impressive, sometimes leaving even a system with dual Xeon Gold 6138's in the dust.  They also followed up with a look at how EPYC compares to Opteron, AMD's last server offerings.  The evolution is something to behold.
  • Opteron vs. EPYC Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Watt: How AMD Server Performance Evolved Over 10 Years
    By now you have likely seen our initial AMD EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarks. If you haven't, check them out, EPYC does really deliver on being competitive with current Intel hardware in the highly threaded space. If you have been curious to see some power numbers on EPYC, here they are from the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Making things more interesting are some comparison benchmarks showing how the AMD EPYC performance compares to AMD Opteron processors from about ten years ago.