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Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Jolla's Sailfish OS Update 10 Is Now Available Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2014 - 11:03am
Story Forget Google's robot cars, now it's on to ANDROID cars Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2014 - 10:52am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2014 - 2:50am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2014 - 2:50am
Story Must Have Android Apps That Aren’t So Well Known Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2014 - 2:17am
Story Of course USA loses in cyber war - NSA and friends made sure it would happen Rianne Schestowitz 22/12/2014 - 12:16am
Story ASF publishes long-overdue Code Of Conduct Rianne Schestowitz 22/12/2014 - 12:05am
Story Building a Healthy Web to Hand to Future Generations Rianne Schestowitz 21/12/2014 - 11:56pm
Story Linus Torvalds Launches Linux Kernel 3.19 RC1, One of the Biggest So Far Rianne Schestowitz 21/12/2014 - 11:46pm
Story Advocacy group: ‘ICT procurement is broken’ Rianne Schestowitz 21/12/2014 - 11:40pm

NVIDIA Linux 2008 Year in Review

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Like we had done in our AMD yearly recap, we are just looking at the stable driver releases that occurred in 2008. While NVIDIA maintains two legacy branches of their driver for older generations of graphics processors, when it comes to their primary driver there have only a handful of official releases this year.

The Wrong Way To Sell Linux

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday: It seems that anymore all we hear about Linux and FOSS is it's free of cost, and that desktop Linux is just as good as Windows because it's all pointy-clicky and you don't have to touch the nasty command line which is frightening and must be avoided, and "just like Mac and Windows" you don't have to learn a thing because it's all magic.

Marooned in KDE and Lovin’ It

Filed under
KDE

linuxtidbits.wordpress: I hadn’t much of a thought of KDE before. When I first started Linux I did as most people did and tried Ubuntu, and I was in love. Gnome did just about everything I needed to do and was endlessly customizable.

Ubuntu FOSScamp builds community

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: The week-long Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) meets every six months at changing locations to discuss what will be in the next release of Ubuntu. The mostly unpublicized FOSScamp always meets the weekend before. The FOSScamp un-conference has no program, no invited speakers, and costs nothing. Like some sort of geek Woodstock but smaller, the Ubuntu hip just show up.

Also: Plymouth Planned For Ubuntu 9.10 Integration
And: Ubuntu on Amazon Beta

Interview with Sjoerd Simons of Empathy

Filed under
Software
Interviews

gnomedesktop.org: This is the third in a series of interviews about open source multimedia. For this interview we check in with Sjoerd Simons who works on the Empathy client, an which combines instant messaging, video conferencing and voice over IP into one application. Sjoerd will talk to us about the current status of Empathy and where it is going.

20 bizarre and funny ways people have broken their computers

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom: We here at Pingdom have gone through those press releases and handpicked the funniest and most bizarre incidents, for your reading pleasure.

Why Linux owes (part of) its success to Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: One of the things that characterizes humanity is our ability to adapt quickly to external change - it’s the key reason, for example, that humans aren’t confined to one climatic zone on the planet.

Fedora Outage Notification: Koji, Wiki, Smolt, Transifex

Filed under
Linux
Web

lwn.net: Fedora has an unplanned outage which began at 2008-12-16 08:10 UTC. There is currently no ETA for resolving the issues which are disk related. Services affected are Koji, Wiki, Smolt and Transifex.

Also: Announcing Omega 10

Mandriva Linux Attracts 2,000 Partners

Filed under
MDV

thevarguy.com: When it comes to Linux, most U.S. headlines involve Canonical, Novell or Red Hat. But another Linux distribution — from Mandriva S.A. of Paris, France — is making a name for itself in the global IT channel.

Fine tunning your Linux hardware Systems

Filed under
Linux

Learn how to tune and troubleshoot your Linux hardware

Opera 9.63 Released

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Hei! We released 9.63 today, which addresses quite some security issues. This release is a recommended security upgrade for all those running the latest stable releases.

Perl 5.8.9 released

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: Perl 5.8.9 has been released as the latest and probably last significant release of the Perl 5.8 series. Future releases of the Perl 5.8 series are expected to only deal with security and platform build issues.

The HeHe2-ness Holiday Linux Gift Guide 2008

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: Doing some shopping for your technical friends this year? Or just following the Golden Rule of Giving? That is, Give Something That You Yourself Would Like In Case They Don’t Get Around To Using It. Either way, we’ve shifted through a wide range of gifts to come up with suggestions and ideas in hopes that we can help you expand your range of gift giving.

Open source isn't free software

Filed under
OSS

blogs.computerworld: There's a long standing argument over the differences between "open-source" software and "free software. But, a more common error outside of software ideology circles is that you can use open-source software anyway you please. Nope. Wrong.

A Readers Digest History of Linux

Filed under
Linux

thelinuxblog.com: Linux as we know it was developed in 1991 by Linux Torvalds based upon the GNU code written by, or at least announced by, Richard Stallman in 1983. Just knowing that dispels the myth that Linux is based upon Unix as GNU stands for “Gnu is Not Unix.” This often leads to the use of the term GNU/LINUX.

The OpenSuse FAQ touched me in a bad place

Filed under
SUSE

meandubuntu.wordpress: Today, I was reading Slashdot coverage on the new release of OpenSUSE. Surfing from there led me from one place to another, eventually ending up on the OpenSUSE FAQ:Novell-MS. There was a particular statement that bothered me enough to make this blog entry.

Going Loco Over the Ubuntu Logo

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: Ubuntu is undoubtedly the most popular Linux distribution at the moment. It has millions of passionate users and tons of dynamic community members that can prove it. Let the following images that I’m going to show to you illustrate this phenomenon.

Amarok2.0 Part Two: Continued failure

Filed under
Software

the-gay-bar.com: First thing I saw is that Amarok couldn't playback files but didn't give me any error message. After some thinking I remembered that Ubuntu doesn't install codecs by default but Amarok just silently failed.

Open-source Software Security Vendor Praises 25 Projects

Filed under
OSS

pcworld.com (IDG): Palamida, a vendor that sells software and services around open-source software security and legal compliance, has named 25 open-source projects companies should not hesitate to use.

What’s new in Linux Mint 6 Felicia?

Filed under
Linux

ubuntulook.com: Based on Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex, Linux 2.6.27, Gnome 2.24 and Xorg 7.4, Linux Mint 6 “Felicia” comes with a brand new “Software Manager”, FTP support in mintUpload, proxy support and history of updates in mintUpdate, mint4win (a Linux Mint installer for Microsoft Windows), tabbed browsing in Nautilus and a lot of other improvements.

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More in Tux Machines

LMMS Guide Part 1: Creating Simple Melodies Using Sounds And Instruments

​LMMS stands for Linux Multimedia Studio. It is a very good open-source program that is used to create music tracks using sound files, predefined instruments, and sound effects. LMMS has versions for Windows and macOS in addition to Linux. Their website, of course, lists all of their features offered to users. This article will attempt to provide practical guides and tips for composing songs using LMMS. Read
more

How To Create Shell Scripts

Having to type the same command over and over again can be a daunting task and tiresome for that matter. The shell scripts are really easy to create and run saving you from a lot of misery and anguish if you really prefer using the terminal over using the GUI for running tasks. Read
more

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.