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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 05/07/2011 - 5:20am
Story Fedora in Public Libraries srlinuxx 2 05/07/2011 - 3:32am
Blog entry Mandriva Desktop 2011 teaser finid 1 05/07/2011 - 2:40am
Story Inside Natty Narwahl: the all-new Ubuntu srlinuxx 1 05/07/2011 - 2:38am
Story Sabayon 6 Review srlinuxx 05/07/2011 - 2:06am
Story Porteus 1.0: On the Trail of SLAX srlinuxx 05/07/2011 - 2:04am
Story The Bootable Maintenance Flash Drive srlinuxx 04/07/2011 - 9:54pm
Story On Linux on desktops.. srlinuxx 04/07/2011 - 9:49pm
Story 5 Free and Open Source Skype Replacements for Linux srlinuxx 04/07/2011 - 9:48pm
Story Why run your own DNS server? (Spamassassin) srlinuxx 04/07/2011 - 7:10pm

Are you an open source user or joiner?

Filed under
OSS

In my previous column, I touched on the issue of what constitutes an open-source vendor. Ask Andy Astor that question, and his answer is a shrug. "Honestly," he says, "who cares?" To Astor, there are really two broad categories of companies with respect to their relationship to open-source code. Some are users. Others are joiners.

An open letter: from a consumer to the distributions

Filed under
Linux

My name is Adam Posey, I'm a resident of Elkins, West Virginia and a GNU/Linux user. I do not run a server nor I do not own a business. What I do have is considerable influence over the buying decisions of other people around me because I am knowledgeable in technology. I have grown very weary of the current state of Linux for the home user.

A Second Look At Pardus 2007.1 RC: Surprises, Surprises

Filed under
Linux

My first look at Pardus 2007.1 Release Candidate was somehow pessimistic, however I was confident in the future. This second attempt will start by showing some success, however it will end with an even more pessimistic view. But let's not anticipate...

An Update On Server/Site Move

Filed under
Site News

Well, I guess we'll go with this debian install. I still haven't worked out all the kinks yet cuz my gran'babies came over today and I didn't get a chance to work on things. I took the opportunity to upgrade drupal as you may have noticed too, and it was a much easier upgrade this time.

Linux Mint: Taking Ubuntu to the Next Level

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

For the last several years, Ubuntu has been providing a superb desktop operating system consisting of open-source software. It has done a great job, but the philosophy behind Ubuntu prevents proprietary software from being included out of the box. This is where Linux Mint comes in.

Home networking Linux and Windows

Filed under
Linux

Lately I've been working on enabling network shares on most of the systems that run in my house. They're the various computers that have shown up over the years and are now parked in corners of rooms around my house. With the exception of the iMac and europa, every one came with Windows pre-installed. If they run Linux, it was installed well after the fact.

Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care

Filed under
OSS

My first planel for South by Southwest was titled, "Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care." Four advocates discussed the reasons for using open source. Pleasantly, there was almost no Microsoft-bashing, and only a little discussion of using open source because it's socially the right thing to do.

Open source can be very `benefit-driven'

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Over the last five years, the IT community has seen a consuming increase in the usage of open-source technologies and acknowledged the role Sun Microsystems played in the process. eWorld spoke to Matt Thomson of Sun Microsystems Inc at Sun Tech Days.

Linux Good for Environment and Bottom Line

Filed under
Linux

A new report from the UK government has found that switching to Linux can not only cut costs but also help reduce the burden of e-waste by dramatically reducing hardware obsolescence.

Four weeks with Ubuntu Linux on the desktop. Part 1: Switching is hard

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the past few weeks, I’ve found that the saying “it just works” is about as useful as saying that airplanes “just fly.” It’s an easy thing to say until you have to learn to pilot one. Foreign languages also “just work.” But have you ever tried to learn one?

Linux is like that.

bash ninja - everyday commands for the commandline

Filed under
HowTos

When using the terminal, there are a lot of tricks and shortcuts that can make using the terminal much more efficient and pleasurable. I'll list here some of the key ones that I use.

Review of Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha 5 (Feisty Fawn)

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

There's a lot of exciting things going on in the world of Linux distros and while browsing for alternatives to (K)Ubuntu I stumbled across PCLinuxOS. While discussing my new found love for PCLOS I decided that I shouldn't forget the distro that seems to have started it all - Ubuntu!

How To Use Jigdo For Incremental CD Updates (Daily Builds)

Filed under
HowTos

Jigdo is really nice for rebuilding daily CD images without downloading the entire CD again, which can waste bandwidth and time when the latest daily build may have only updated a handful of packages. Here is what you’ll need to setup and use Jigdo.

Why Ubuntu isn’t mainstream yet

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’ve been using Fedora for about 8-9 months at work and have recently moved from XP to Ubuntu on my home machine as well. My reason was that to check out something new (and free) before I decide to dish out cash for Vista and a system upgrade (although I’d prefer to buy a Vista Ready laptop and keep my desktop as it is). I’d heard a lot of good things about Ubuntu and wanted to give Linux a second chance (after nightmares at work with Fedora Core 3).

The Power of Linux Console

Filed under
HowTos

A console (terminal, terminal emulation) and a shell are equivalent to what is commonly known in Windows as the ‘command line’. For many it’s just a mysterious and unnecessary system tool, reserved only for the ‘1337′.

Freespire 2.0 Alpha 1 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

With the switch to an Ubuntu base, development of Freespire 2.0 has restarted. The first alpha release of Freespire 2.0 is now available for download and we had decided to check it out for ourselves.

Setting Up A DNS Server On Ubuntu Edgy With MyDNS And MyDNSConfig

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure MyDNS and MyDNSConfig. MyDNS is a DNS server that uses a MySQL database as backend instead of configuration files like, for example, Bind or djbdns.

Cracking Open the Door to Open Source

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

When Bill Hilf came from IBM Corp. to join Microsoft three years ago, the company's stance on open source vacillated wildly. It would swing from outright indifference to overt nastiness. Today, something else is unfolding: Microsoft is striking a surprising balance. It has stopped dismissing open source licensing and community development as dangerous folly or evil foe, and is looking for a way to both compete and co-exist.

Should Google acquire Open Office?

Filed under
Google

I think there could be a lot of benefits to both parties if Open Office were to work along side the Google Docs team. Now I’m not talking about Google buying Open Office; instead I’m talking about Google hiring some programmers to work on the Open Office application and help integrate the two. I know this is going to cause some controversy, but just hear me out.

Former Mass. CIO feels 'bittersweet pride' after battles with Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

As CIO of Massachusetts from February to November last year, Louis Gutierrez had to endure most of the brunt of Microsoft Corp.'s political wrath over a state policy calling for the adoption of the Open Document Format for Office Applications, or ODF.

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Debian Needs Artwork, Sysadmin Horrors, VA Linux

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today's leftovers

  • Windows 10 pain: Reg man has 75 per cent upgrade failure rate
    As your humble HPC correspondent for The Register, I should probably be running Linux on the array of systems here at the home office suite. But I don't. I've been a Microsoft guy since I bought my first computer way back in 1984. You, dear readers, can rip me for being a MStard, but it works worked well for my business and personal needs. I've had my ups and downs with the company, but I think I've received good value for my money and I've managed to solve every problem I've had over the years. Until yesterday, that is. Yesterday was the day that I marked on my calendar as "Upgrade to Windows 10 Day." We currently have four systems in our arsenal here, two laptops and two desktops. The laptops are Lenovo R61 and W510 systems, and the desktops are a garden variety box based on an Asus P7P55D Pro motherboard. The other desktop is my beloved Hydra 2.0 liquid cooled, dual-processor, monster system based on the EVGA Classified SR-2 motherboard. These details turn out to be important in our story.
  • Rygel/Shotwell/GUADEC
  • How to setup HTTP2 in cPanel/WHM Linux VPS using EasyApache3
  • Pushed Fedora Graphical upgrade via Gnome software utility
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/30
  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Available for System76 PCs, Ubuntu 15.10 Users Must Upgrade
    As reported by us last week, Canonical announced the first point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and it looks like the guys over System76 were pretty quick to push the update to users' computers. Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS is the latest, most advanced version of the Xenial Xerus operating system, and we recommend that you upgrade to it as soon as possible if you didn't do it already. This is an important point release because it also opens up the upgrade path for users of the Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS (Trusty Tahr) distribution.
  • A Reminder Of Why I Hate Ubuntu
    Yesterday I was reminded why I hate Ubuntu. I suddenly was unable to SSH into Odroid-C2. From Odroid-C2 I could do everything as normal. It turned out the IP address had changed despite my HOST declaration in Beast’s DHCP server and Odroid-C2 being set to use DHCP, or so I thought. Nope. There was a dhclient.conf file in Odroid-C2 which requested everything and the kitchen sink from DHCP, stuff I had no use of like netbios… The man page for the dhclient.conf file says it all: “The require statement lists options that must be sent in order for an offer to be accepted. Offers that do not contain all the listed options will be ignored. There is no default require list.”
  • Thin Mini-ITX board taps Braswell SoCs, offers 4K video
    IEI’s “tKINO-BW” Mini-ITX board features Intel Pentium and Celeron “Braswell” SoCs, 4K video, triple display support, and optional remote management. Over the last year, numerous Mini-ITX boards based on Intel’s “Braswell” family of 14nm SoCs have reached market, but there have been far fewer models billed as being “thin.” This somewhat arbitrary term refers to boards with low-profile coastline port layouts, generally for space-constrained embedded applications rather than big gaming boxes.