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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE 4.11 RC1 Released srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 2:06am
Story Differences Between Persistent Live USB and Full Linux Install on USB srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 2:04am
Story Slackware Turns 20 srlinuxx 18/07/2013 - 2:03am
Story Benchmark: X.org VS Mir srlinuxx 17/07/2013 - 11:59pm
Story Netrunner 13.06 "Enigma" KDE Review srlinuxx 17/07/2013 - 11:58pm
Story The Day of GNU/Linux srlinuxx 17/07/2013 - 11:56pm
Story JOE: Old-School Text Editor Teaches New Lessons srlinuxx 2 17/07/2013 - 10:35pm
Story The Raspberry Pi Needs a Roadmap srlinuxx 17/07/2013 - 9:50pm
Story Best Open Source Games srlinuxx 17/07/2013 - 9:19pm
Story GNU Awk: This is Not Your Father's Awk srlinuxx 17/07/2013 - 9:16pm

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 226

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: A look at Ubuntu and Kubuntu 7.10

  • News: FreeBSD release engineering team back in action, Mandriva updates,
  • Ubuntu "Hardy Heron" features, ALT Linux interview, GIMP 2.4

  • Released last week: Sabayon Linux 1.1 "Professional", Damn Small Linux 4.0
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 9, FreeBSD 6.3 and 7.0
  • Site news: User agent statistics
  • New additions: Comfusion

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Get a fresh desktop distro: Linux Mint 4

Filed under
Linux

tectonic: Linux Mint 4.0, codenamed Daryana, was released on Friday. Based on the Ubuntu Gutsy packages, this distro appears to fulfil the the development team's stated goal to "produce an elegant, up to date and comfortable GNU/Linux desktop distribution".

Negroponte: Windows key to OLPC philosophy

Filed under
OLPC

zdnet: While the news that Microsoft is developing a version of Windows for the so-called "$100 laptop" has caused some consternation, the head of the One Laptop per Child project has said the scheme could not promote openness if it blocked Windows.

3 Days with gentoo

Filed under
Gentoo

silentcoder: So I finally made my choice of new distros. I opted for gentoo. I actually tried archlinux first but it annoyed me insanely within ten minutes. Now I last used Gentoo a good 3 years ago, so a lot has changed, here then, a short review after my first 3 days, as we speak - I just loaded up my first functional KDE desktop.

this morning's ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • One Wild Week with Ubuntu Linux

  • Ubuntu Hardy Heron Roadmap
  • Edubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) Screenshots
  • Ubuntu Georgia US 7.10 Release Party
  • Get better sound in Ubuntu with the Brand new OSS 4!
  • Why I Switched (Ubuntu vs Gentoo)

GIMP tricks: Liquid rescaling by example

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: Have you ever taken a picture which would be just great only if you could remove that strange unwanted object that showed up in the middle of nowhere and now kills the whole effect? Or perhaps you just want to get rid of your ex-girlfriend and keep the photo with a fantastic landscape alone? Whatever your secret plans are, GIMP Liquid rescale plugin is there for you. Just use it!

Analyse Linux networks through the ethereal world of Wireshark

Filed under
Software

iTWire: What’s happening on your network? Tools exist to display raw data but you still need to put work in to uncover real information. Here’s where a network analyser comes in: it will separate the AIM chatter from the MSN; it will divide RPC from SMB. And the best open-source network analyser is Wireshark.

Reverse Linux Compatibility List

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

This is a list of hardware that does not have support on Linux and needs Linux kernel drivers written for them.

Making Linux application user interfaces richer with OpenGL

Filed under
OSS

arstechnica: One fascinating session (and one that shows how FOSSCamp works and why it's so productive) was given by Mirco Müller, who discussed using OpenGL in GTK applications. Müller talked about the state of OpenGL support in desktop applications and described various techniques that developers can use to make OpenGL content integrate better with conventional GTK user interfaces.

some ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Hello Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu vs. Yellowdog on the PS3
  • Ubuntu Studio 7.10 Gutsy

deb blogs

Filed under
Linux
  • Another Day Another Distro – Part 5 – Debian 4.0 Etch

  • Lenny became Etch: It’s time to settle down
  • Debbie is still running

few shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • KDE Quickies: Radio Amarok, 12 KDE Tips, Asus' KDE Laptop

  • Lancelot is … launching?
  • kde4 krush days: saturday!
  • Mandriva 2008.1 Spring Ideas

Mint, Ubuntu, and OpenSUSE

Filed under
Linux

Steve Carl: I had taken my Dell D620, configured with Mint 3.1. It was reliable and trouble free. What was left over from that trip was an issue from the previous post about OpenSUSE 10.3. It was troublesome enough on the D620 hardware that I ejected it at the last minute in favor of Mint 3.1. I had two days back in the office between trips, and spent one evening after everyone left setting up a new set of Linux test systems.

Virtualization: Ubuntu server + KDE/Xfce - Part I

Filed under
Ubuntu

jon-reagan.blogspot: The Ubuntu server CD is great for virtualization: it's fast, and it also allows for personalization. I decided to use Ubuntu 7.04 as the host system, since VMware Server is included in the repositories.

Mepis Updates KDE and the kernel

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: For MEPIS 7.0, KDE has been updated to version 3.5.8 and the kernel has been updated to 2.6.22-10. The nvidia driver has been updated to 100.14.19.

Linux: The Little Operating System That Really Can

Filed under
Linux

lockergnome blogs: I began what I like to think of as my “Linux Adventure”, in February of 2006 on a short, much-frazzled shoestring. Recently, through the generosity of a friend, I was able to acquire several identical 600 MHz Celeron systems. What follows is my own, purely subjective, personal opinion of several distributions I’ve tried in the last two weeks.

My PCLinuxOS “WOW” moment

Filed under
PCLOS

mckooiker.byethost5: Last week I changed computer and since my “new” computer (Pentium4, 3.2GHz processor, 512Mb RAM) came with a bigger hard-disk I have more space to try new software and operating systems. The first distribution I installed was PCLinuxOS, and after one week of trying I will make a preliminary judgment today.

Also: PCLinuxOS Bounces Back on Distrowatch

long and short of it

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 7.10 Review

  • A second look at Ubuntu 7.10
  • Ubuntu / Kubuntu Linux 7.10 Review - Fantastic!
  • Ubuntu Hardy Heron

coupla howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to switch between different Java (JVM) in Ubuntu and Debian GNU Linu

  • Getting MX900 working on Ubuntu

Revival of the N-Word

Filed under
Humor

tech.blorge: I don't really know anyone who likes to referred to in a derogatory way but the N-word seems to evoke the most emotion of all the derogatory and defamatory words that one's imagination can conjure.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Atom Installer
    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage. In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.
  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More
    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More
    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution. Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • IOTA: IoT revolutionized with a Ledger
    Ever since the introduction of digital money, the world quickly came to realize how dire and expensive the consequences of centralized systems are. Not only are these systems incredibly expensive to maintain, they are also “single points of failures” which expose a large number of users to unexpected service interruptions, fraudulent activities and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious hackers. Thanks to Blockchain, which was first introduced through Bitcoin in 2009, the clear benefits of a decentralized and “trustless” transactional settlement system became apparent. No longer should expensive trusted third parties be used for handling transactions, instead, the flow of money should be handled in a direct, Peer-to-Peer fashion. This concept of a Blockchain (or more broadly, a distributed ledger) has since then become a global phenomenon attracting billions of dollars in investments to further develop the concept.
  • Return Home and Unify: My Case for Unity 8
  • Can netbooks be cool again?
    Earlier this week, my colleague Chaim Gartenberg covered a laptop called the GPD Pocket, which is currently being funded on Indiegogo. As Chaim pointed out, the Pocket’s main advantage is its size — with a 7-inch screen, the thing is really, really small — and its price, a reasonable $399. But he didn’t mention that the Pocket is the resurrection of one of the most compelling, yet fatally flawed, computing trends of the ‘00s: the netbook. So after ten years, are netbooks finally cool again? That might be putting it too strongly, but I’m willing to hope.

Linux Devices

  • Compact, rugged module runs Linux or Android on Apollo Lake
    Ubiqcomm’s 95 x 95mm, Apollo Lake-based “COM-AL6C” COM offers 4K video along with multiple SATA, USB, GbE, and PCIe interfaces, plus -40 to 85°C operation. Ubiqconn Technology Inc. has announced a “COM-AL6C” COM Express Type 6 Compact form factor computer-on-module built around Intel’s Apollo Lake processors and designed to withstand the rigors of both fixed and mobile industrial applications. The module offers a choice among three Intel Apollo Lake processors: the quad-core Atom x5-E3930, quad-core x5-E3940, and dual-core x7-E3950, which are clocked at up to 2.0GHz burst and offer TDPs from 6.5 to 12 Watts.
  • Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266
    To get started with IoT (the Internet of Things), your device needs, well, an Internet connection. Base Arduino microcontrollers don't have Internet connectivity by default, so you either need to add Ethernet, Wi-Fi shields, or adapters to them, or buy an Arduino that has built-in Internet connectivity. In addition to complexity, both approaches add cost and consume the already-precious Arduino flash RAM for program space, which limits what you can do. Another approach is to use a Raspberry Pi or similar single-board computer that runs a full-blown operating system like Linux. The Raspberry Pi is a solid choice in many IoT use cases, but it is often overkill when all you really want to do is read a sensor and send the reading up to a server in the cloud. Not only does the Raspberry Pi potentially drive up the costs, complexity, and power consumption of your project, but it is running a full operating system that needs to be patched, and it has a much larger attack surface than a simple microcontroller. When it comes to IoT devices and security, simpler is better, so you can spend more time making and less time patching what you already made.
  • Blinkenlights!
  • Blinkenlights, part 2
  • Blinkenlights, part 3
  • [Older] Shmoocon 2017: The Ins And Outs Of Manufacturing And Selling Hardware
    Every day, we see people building things. Sometimes, useful things. Very rarely, this thing becomes a product, but even then we don’t hear much about the ins and outs of manufacturing a bunch of these things or the economics of actually selling them. This past weekend at Shmoocon, [Conor Patrick] gave the crowd the inside scoop on selling a few hundred two factor authentication tokens. What started as a hobby is now a legitimate business, thanks to good engineering and abusing Amazon’s distribution program.
  • 1.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users NEVER use a PC, 200 Million PC Internet Users never use a mobile phone. Understanding the 3.5 Billion Internet Total Audience
    As I am working to finish the 2017 Edition of the TomiAhonen Almanac (last days now) I always get into various updates of numbers, that remind me 'I gotta tell this story'.. For example the internet user numbers. We have the December count by the ITU for year 2016, that says the world has now 3.5 Billion internet users in total (up from 3.2 Billion at the end of year 2015). So its no 'drama' to know what is 'that' number. The number of current internet total users is yes, 3.5 Billion, almost half of the planet's total population (47%).