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Thursday, 18 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Microsoft must finish the job of opening .Net Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 11:49am
Story GlobalSight shines with open source in the translation community Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 11:47am
Story Intel Publishes More Skylake Linux Graphics Patches Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 11:46am
Story How open source is changing our food Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 10:58am
Story Microsoft: GPL or GTFO Roy Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 10:53am
Story Bits from Debian Med team (by Andreas Tille) Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 8:13am
Story Secure Distros and Top Desktops Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 6:05am
Story Get your TONGUE around our LOLLIPOP, says Google Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 6:01am
Story GCC 5 at Phoronix Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 5:52am
Story CS:GO & TF2 Extensively Tested On The Newest Open-Source Radeon Linux Driver Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 5:48am

GNUveau Networks builds solar-powered Linux computer networks

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Scott Johnson of GNUveau Networks has developed a solar-powered Internet "hub" system (running Ubuntu GNU/Linux) that he builds to order in his Daytona Beach, Florida, home. His objective is to bring computers and the Internet to places that have no connectivity, no phone service, and no electricity.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 277

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: An overview of Ubuntu editions

  • News: Fedora unveils Plymouth, Sugar spin, Sabayon hints at major new features, Yellow Dog launches beta testing, NetBSD prepares to branch 5.0, CrossOver Linux
  • Released last week: Ubuntu 8.10, OpenBSD 4.4
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 10 Preview, Ubuntu 9.04 release schedule
  • Donations: GoblinX receives US$250
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Gentoo: USE=kerberos removed from the default profiles

  • Linux Void: Episode 11 - Hawking Pumpkins
  • (Poll) Which OS do you prefer?
  • How to install latest Amarok and digikam in Fedora 9

Is Ubuntu's Popularity Endangering the Linux Ecosystem?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

junauza.com: After I have read iTWire's recent article entitled "Is Ubuntu killing other distributions?" I remembered asking myself the same question when I noticed how Ubuntu is taking over the Linux world.

IPv6 in Linux

linuxdevices.com: This article discusses the advantages of IPv6, which in addition to a larger address space promises to increase standby time in devices, and improve performance in routers. It discusses IPv6 technology, as well as how IPv6 has been implemented in the Linux kernel.

Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex raises the bar

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: Each new Ubuntu release has raised the standard by which other Linux distros are judged. With the new Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex, the focus is on mobility and 3G network support. I found Intrepid to be a fast and stable release, yet I experienced some minor issues that keep it from absolute perfection.

Ubuntu disappointment and data disasters

pcpro.co.uk/blogs: Ubuntu 8.10 made its appearence this week, and while everybody was busy touting the network manager’s new-fangled ability to handle mobile broadband connections, what nobody seemed to be mentioning was that it doesn’t actually work very well.

States Stand Aside as Open Source Bandwagon Rolls By

technewsworld.com: While some state governments have explored the idea of using open source software in their systems, the same gripes continue to hold back its adoption: Quality, compatibility and security. Some states make use of open source, but all stop short of mandating its use.

Open source Ogg Theora video codec completes beta phase

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: After a one year beta phase, the Xiph Foundation's free Ogg Theora video codec has been released in its final, "mainline", version 1.0. Rather than redesigning the open source compression algorithm from scratch, Xiph.org worked on enhancing the "Truemotion VP3.2" codec released under an open source licence by On2 Technologies.

Compiz Fusion News: Tons of new developments!

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: The Compiz Fusion Community News for Nov 4, 2008 is now available. Topics include Improved startup time for compiz, Compiz 0.7.8 released, and Three new plugins.

OpenOffice 3.0 - the only option for masochistic Linux users

Filed under
OOo

theregister.co.uk: In a brilliant execution of public relations, OpenOffice.org 3.0 was released without enough capacity to handle the demand for downloads. Servers buckled under the traffic, and some of us in the media took the bait. Are people really getting that excited over an open source productivity suite?

What's up with the GNOME Linux Desktop?

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: It takes money and it takes new ideas to build a better desktop, both of which are being raised by the open source GNOME Foundation. GNOME is one of the most popular Linux desktop GUIs and is included in nearly every Linux distribution.

Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2009 Review

Filed under
MDV

linuxbsdos.com: Mandriva Linux Powerpack is one of three editions of the Linux desktop published by Mandriva. Mandriva Linux Powerpack is the commercial edition, and costs 49 EUR, or 62 USD. In this tutorial, we take a somewhat detailed review of Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2009.

Also: Distro Test: Mandriva Linux 2009 Kde 4 edition

The Last Gasp for Linux on the Desktop?

Filed under
Linux

ibeentoubuntu.com: I've been using Linux on the desktop for almost eleven years now. I enjoy it. I understand it. I'm not likely to ever leave it. I also know that I'm in a niche market. There were predictions that each year would be the "Year of Linux" and we all know where that led.

Four winning ways to monitor machines through Web interfaces

Filed under
Software

linux.com: System administrators need to keep an eye on their servers to make sure things are running smoothly. If they find a problem, they need to see when it started, so investigations can focus on what happened at that time. Here's a look at several tools that let you monitor one or more servers from a Web interface.

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Smoothly Transfer From Windows to Linux

  • Intrepid Ibex Release Party almost got arrested
  • What bloggers think of Ubuntu 8.10
  • Updating to Intrepid: Notes
  • Avoiding regressions more important than on-time release

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Debian Project News - November 3rd

  • Ubuntu’s Linux contributions
  • Top 10 improvements Ubuntu should work on
  • FSF Releases New Version of GNU Free Documentation License
  • Can Drupal beat Wordpress?
  • Mepis Fix for Mounting NTFS Partitions
  • Community relations key to open source success
  • Mandriva - Day 1, Day 2
  • Two additional ways to tail a log file
  • Fedora Classroom begins November 8
  • Filling the Open Source Usability Testing Gap
  • Acer Aspire One, and Power Saving in Ubuntu
  • Stormy Peters about Marketing GNOME
  • OpenOffice 3.0 Beefs Up Collaboration, Extensions
  • RPM Fusion For Fedora Officially Launches
  • 3 out of 10 Asus PCs run desktop Linux
  • Linux Outlaws 62 - Ballmer Island
  • There is a BBC in my Amarok

Why I switched to the OLPC—and why I dropped it

Filed under
OLPC
OSS

Richard M. Stallman: The One Laptop Per Child project, launched by MIT professor Nicholas Negroponte in 2003, was supposed to lead millions of children around the world to information technology and freedom. The plans aimed for low cost, enabling many children to use the machines, and free software, so they would have freedom while using them. I thought it was a good idea. But...

Motorola and Google become GNOME sponsors

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The GNOME Foundation announced today that Google and Motorola have joined the organization's advisory board and will sponsor ongoing development of the open source desktop environment.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Updated F27 Live ISOs, Synergy 2.0, Bodhi 3.2.0, Announcing Flapjack

  • F27-20180112 Updated Live Isos Released
    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.13-300 kernel.
  • synergy-2.0.0 is in Fedora updates-testing
    I have packed the latest stable version, 2.0.0, for Fedora 27, 26 and EPEL 7. No EPEL 6 update this time as it requires CXX14, which EL6 does not provide.
  • Bodhi 3.2.0 released
  • Announcing Flapjack
    Here’s a post about a tool that I’ve developed at work. You might find it useful if you contribute to any desktop platform libraries that are packaged as a Flatpak runtime, such as GNOME or KDE. Flatpak is a system for delivering desktop applications that was pioneered by the GNOME community. At Endless, we have jumped aboard the Flatpak train. Our product Endless OS is a Linux distribution, but not a traditional one in the sense of being a collection of packages that you install with a package manager; it’s an immmutable OS image, with atomic updates delivered through OSTree. Applications are sandboxed-only and Flatpak-only.
  • Flapjack Helps Developers Work On Components Inside Flatpak

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Latvia's e-health system hit by cyberattack from abroad
    Latvia said its new e-health system was on Tuesday hit by a large-scale cyberattack that saw thousands of requests for medical prescriptions pour in per second from more than 20 countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the European Union. No data was compromised, according to health officials, who immediately took down the site, which was launched earlier this month to streamline the writing of prescriptions in the Baltic state. "It is clear that it was a planned attack, a widespread attack—we might say a specialised one—as it emanated from computers located in various different countries, both inside the European Union and outside Europe," state secretary Aivars Lapins told reporters. "We received thousands of requests in a very short space of time. That's not the normal way the system works," he said, adding that an investigation is under way.
  • Linux Lite Developer Creates Automated Spectre/Meltdown Checker for Linux OSes
    The developer of the Ubuntu-based Linux Lite distribution has created a script that makes it easier for Linux users to check if their systems are vulnerable to the Meltdown and Spectre security flaws. As we reported last week, developer Stéphane Lesimple created an excellent script that would check if your Linux distribution's kernel is patched against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that have been publicly disclosed earlier this month and put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Purism Releases Meltdown and Spectre Patches for Its Librem Linux Laptops
    Purism, the computer technology company behind the privacy-focused, Linux-based Librem laptops and the upcoming smartphone, released patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities. The company was one of the first Linux OEMs and OS vendor to announce that it's working on addressing both the Meltdown and Spectre security exploits on his Linux laptops. Meltdown and Spectre have been unearthed in early January and they are two severe hardware bugs that put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Facebook Awards Security Researchers $880,000 in 2017 Bug Bounties
    Facebook is hardly a small organization, with large teams of engineers and security professionals on staff. Yet even Facebook has found that it can profit from expertise outside of the company, which is why the social networking giant has continued to benefit from its bug bounty program. In 2017, Facebook paid out $880,000 to security researchers as part of its bug bounty program. The average reward payout in 2017 was $1,900, up from $1,675 in 2016.
  • Multicloud Deployments Create Security Challenges, F5 Report Finds

Arch Linux vs. Antergos vs. Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu Benchmarks

Last week when sharing the results of tweaking Ubuntu 17.10 to try to make it run as fast as Clear Linux, it didn't take long for Phoronix readers to share their opinions on Arch Linux and the request for some optimized Arch Linux benchmarks against Clear Linux. Here are some results of that testing so far in carrying out a clean Arch Linux build with some basic optimizations compared to using Antergos Minimal out-of-the-box, Ubuntu Server, and Clear Linux. Tests this time around were done on the Intel Core i9 7980XE system with ASUS PRIME X299-A motherboard, 4 x 4GB DDR4-3200 Corsair memory, GeForce GTX 750, and Corsair Force MP500 120GB NVMe solid-state drive. The system with 18 cores / 36 threads does make for quick and easy compiling of many Linux packages. Read more

Mozilla Leftovers

  • Making WebAssembly even faster: Firefox’s new streaming and tiering compiler
    People call WebAssembly a game changer because it makes it possible to run code on the web faster. Some of these speedups are already present, and some are yet to come. One of these speedups is streaming compilation, where the browser compiles the code while the code is still being downloaded. Up until now, this was just a potential future speedup. But with the release of Firefox 58 next week, it becomes a reality. Firefox 58 also includes a new 2-tiered compiler. The new baseline compiler compiles code 10–15 times faster than the optimizing compiler.
  • Firefox Telemetry Use Counters: Over-estimating usage, now fixed
    Firefox Telemetry records the usage of certain web features via a mechanism called Use Counters. Essentially, for every document that Firefox loads, we record a “false” if the document didn’t use a counted feature, and a “true” if the document did use that counted feature.
  • Firefox 58 new contributors
  • Giving and receiving help at Mozilla
    This is going to sound corny, but helping people really is one of my favorite things at Mozilla, even with projects I have mostly moved on from. As someone who primarily works on internal tools, I love hearing about bugs in the software I maintain or questions on how to use it best. Given this, you might think that getting in touch with me via irc or slack is the fastest and best way to get your issue addressed. We certainly have a culture of using these instant-messaging applications at Mozilla for everything and anything. Unfortunately, I have found that being “always on” to respond to everything hasn’t been positive for either my productivity or mental health. My personal situation aside, getting pinged on irc while I’m out of the office often results in stuff getting lost — the person who asked me the question is often gone by the time I return and am able to answer.
  • Friend of Add-ons: Trishul Goe
    Our newest Friend of Add-ons is Trishul Goel! Trishul first became involved with Mozilla five years when he was introduced to the Firefox OS smartphone. As a JavaScript developer with an interest in Mozilla’s mission, he looked for opportunities to get involved and began contributing to SUMO, L10n, and the Firefox OS Marketplace, where he contributed code and developed and reviewed apps. After Firefox OS was discontinued as a commercial product, Trishul became interested in contributing to Mozilla’s add-ons projects. After landing his first code contributions to addons.mozilla.org (AMO), he set about learning how to develop extensions for Firefox using WebExtensions APIs. Soon, he began sharing his knowledge by leading and mentoring workshops for extension developers as part of Mozilla’s “Build Your Own Extension” Activate campaign.