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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Several Nice Linux Easter Eggs

Filed under
Humor

Although some of this stuff is old, here are some funny easter eggs I bumped into over time.

In APT
Fire up a terminal and type the following, one command at a time:

Mozilla Prism - Site-Specific Browser

Filed under
Moz/FF

dedoimedo.com: The first time you hear about site-specific browsing, you raise a brow and wonder. What is this thing? And how is it different from the ... eh ... regular browsing.

Do operating systems still matter?

Filed under
OS

ianmurdock.com: Do operating systems (still) matter? If you’re writing an application at the level of Java or PHP, what difference does it make what operating system is running underneath?

Dumping Windows for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

livewithoutwork.com: I have decided after much deliberation that I am no longer going to withstand Microsoft Window’s buggy software.

Linux: Drivers Should NOT be Closed Source

Filed under
Linux

doctormo.wordpress: In one of my previous blog entries about a Dell Support issue some of the comments suggested that the reason we were in this mess was because of the inflexible nature of the Linux kernel.

Changes to the GNOME System Administration Team

Filed under
Software

lwn.net (gnome-announce-list): We'd like to announce a formal system administration team. GNOME has long had an informal sysadmin team that has managed the gnome.org services.

Ubuntu Netbook Remix woes

Filed under
Ubuntu

Envizions Announces 3-D Online Community for Linux Game Console

Filed under
Web

ostatic.com/blog: When I read the press release about EVO's community, called "My Universe," I shuddered violently enough to shake the couch and scare the small dog sitting beside me. I realize that maybe, in the EVO's case, this might not be a fair assumption.

Ubuntu 9.04: Faster, but more of the same.

Filed under
Ubuntu

techiemoe.com: The latest entry, 9.04 "Jaunty Jackalope," promises to be another iterative release, with a couple of new features (faster boot, overhaulted notifications system) but nothing to blow your skirt up.

Washington state rejects open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: National, state and local governments are all waking up to the opportunity open source offers. Washington state, the home of Microsoft, appears to be an exception.

Also: How open source got its wings

Android destined for a set-top box?

linuxdevices.com: Motorola and KDDI are developing a new version of their Linux-based Au Box set-top box (STB) that runs the Android stack.

Where do I find Linux software?

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: But what if you are searching for Linux software? Where do you go? Is there a one stop shop for all of your software needs? Yes and no. Even though that answer is not a resounding YES! there is a plus side.

Mark Shuttleworth: Meta-cycles: 2-3 year major cycles for free software?

Filed under
Ubuntu

markshuttleworth.com: Six-month cycles are great. Now let’s talk about meta-cycles: broader release cycles for major work. I’m very interested in a cross-community conversation about this.

Dconf in GNOME 3.0 : one step further to Windows registry ?

Filed under
Software

linux-wizard.net: Today, while reading LWN.net Weekly Edition for April 9 concerning GNOME 3.0, I noticed the part about dconf. Dconf aims to replace ... gconf already. Yeah, we can't keep a simple technology as simple as reading and writing application configurations settings more than 8 years ...

Switching To KDE From Gnome

Filed under
KDE

customdistros.com: This morning I thought I would shake things up a little and start using KDE instead of Gnome. Installation of KDE is simple enough, but actually using it turned out to be a little different for a KDE newbie such as myself.

10 things you should look for in a netbook

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.techrepublic.com: When you’re evaluating netbooks, you have to weigh the convenience of their small form factor against a variety of limitations. Erik Eckel explains several key considerations that will help you find a suitable middle ground.

Nexuiz 2.5

Filed under
Gaming

freegamer.blogspot: So what are the big selling points of 2.5 from the player side of view? According to the changelog: New HUD, new weapons, new racing game mode, improved look & sound, better bots.

Do you need to worry about the new /dev/mem rootkit problem?

Filed under
Security

blog.ibeentoubuntu.com: A new paper was presented in late March about using /dev/mem to inject and hide a rootkit (PDF), and the method has been getting some press, leading to a little concern.

Lancelot and Raptor menu - the other way

Filed under
KDE
Software

polishlinux.org: Lancelot and Raptor are alternative menus intended for KDE 4. We are, however, at the frosty point, and we should ask ourselves the most important question here - which one to choose.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.30

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The next major Linux version will include new Wi-Fi drivers for chips from Atheros, Intel, Intersil/Prism and Marvell and new drivers for Intel LAN chips. The kernel will also in future make better use of energy saving features.

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More in Tux Machines

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more

FOSS FUD From EFF and Black Duck

Posts From MiniDebConf Hamburg 2018

  • Debian is wrong
    So, the MiniDebConf Hamburg 2018 is about to end, it's sunny, no clouds are visible and people seem to be happy. And, I have time to write this blog post! So, just as a teaser for now, I'll present to you the content of some slides of our "Reproducible Buster" talk today. Later I will add links to the video and the full slides.
  • Mini DebConf Hamburg
    Since Friday around noon time, I and my 6-year-old son are at the Mini DebConf in Hamburg. Attending together with my son is quite a different experience than plain alone or with also having my wife around. Though he is doing pretty good, it mostly means the day ends for me around 2100 when he needs to go to sleep.