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About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story COM Express module runs Linux on a 2.3GHz Tegra K1 Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2015 - 8:25am
Story From the Editors: You’ve come a long way, Linux Rianne Schestowitz 05/03/2015 - 8:21am
Story SteamOS A Linux Distribution For Gaming Mohd Sohail 05/03/2015 - 4:22am
Story KDE Applications 14.12.3 Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 1 04/03/2015 - 11:30pm
Story Understanding The Linux Kernel's BPF In-Kernel Virtual Machine Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2015 - 8:58pm
Story Calligra 2.9.0 is Out Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2015 - 8:38pm
Story Latest Nvidia Shield player runs Android TV on Tegra X1 Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2015 - 8:30pm
Story ​Companies really want Linux-savvy employees and they want them now Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2015 - 8:22pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 Flavors Beta 1 Available to Download Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2015 - 1:37pm
Story Mozilla's *Really* Important News: Thunderbird Lives Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2015 - 1:27pm

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • bugs in ext4

  • How To Be Part Of A Supercomputer With BOINC
  • Migrating from Trac to Redmine
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Kernel Update Has Broken Wired Connection
  • Open Multiple Terminals in Single Windows using Terminator
  • How to Moonlight
  • Repair Corrupt RPM databases
  • Sexy server administration
  • How can I avoid running a python script multiple times?
  • Find The Fastest Arch Linux Reposity Mirror(s) With Rankmirror

  • polyglot: bash me harder
  • Setting up NTP in Gentoo

Xubuntu 8.10 + Xfce 4.6: Screenshots

Filed under
Software

zdnet.com.au: If GNOME feels like it is too bulky and KDE is not the Linux desktop answer that you are looking for, then you should consider the Xubuntu distribution that ships with the Xfce desktop.

UT3 Linux Still Undergoing Work, No ETA

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Unreal Tournament 3 was released back on the 17th of November in 2007. Nearly a year and a half later, we still have no UT3 Linux client.

Programming languages that melt your brain

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: In their day-to-day jobs, coders naturally focus on the more commonly used languages, such as PHP, Python and SDL, but there are plenty of more left-field choices, such as Ruby and assembly, that are well worth learning.

PC Vendors: Put up or shut up on the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: I was really happy when Dell started selling mainstream PCs with pre-installed Ubuntu Linux. Other companies started shipping mass-market PCs and notebooks with Linux too. Well. Sort of. You see, except for Dell, everyone makes it a pain to get their Linux-enabled PCs. And, I'm sick of it.

Renoise 2.0

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Soundtrackers are cool. They let musicians create music in a style reminiscent of the way assembler programmers write code. Notes become numbers and timing becomes a position in a list. Renoise is a proprietary sound tracker for Windows, OS X and Linux.

Firefox 3.1 Beta 3 now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: Firefox 3.1 Beta 3 is now available for download. This milestone is focused on testing the core functionality provided by many new features and changes to the platform scheduled for Firefox 3.1.

Two Reasons the Command Line Trumps the Graphical User Interface

Filed under
Software

blog.eracc.com: I am not a text mode Luddite. I use a graphical user interface (GUI) every day. However, for certain tasks a GUI is just not the best choice.

Supercomputer niche chucks rocks at Nehalem

Filed under
Gentoo
Hardware

theregister.co.uk: As niche supercomputer-maker SiCortex works on the next generation of its line and watches the IT marketing machine gearing up for Intel's impending Nehalem-based Xeon EP, the company says that Chipzilla isn't moving in the right direction for high-performance computing (HPC) workloads.

Why Is Moblin's X.Org Stack Faster Than In Ubuntu?

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Canonical's Scott James Remnant recently set out to explore why X.Org started up so much faster on Moblin than on Ubuntu.

O hai Knoppix

Filed under
Linux

newlinuxuser.com: I’ve successfully download the latest version of Knoppix and it’s now running live from my USB drive. Awesome, ain’t it?

TomTom Linux impact light hit so far

Filed under
Legal

blogs.the451group: I’ve been talking to device manufacturers and the Linux-centered software providers and I can definitively report that I am not hearing or sensing any fear, uncertainty or doubt (FUD) as a result of Microsoft’s TomTom patent suit.

Kernel Log: What's new in 2.6.29 - Part 5

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: It will be at least another week or two before Linux kernel 2.6.29 becomes available. The Kernel Log will, therefore, continue its report about the new features scheduled for 2.6.29 with what's new in terms of file systems.

Delayed allocation and the zero-length file problem

Filed under
Software

thunk.org/tytso: A recent Ubuntu bug has gotten slashdotted, and has started raising a lot of questions about the safety of using ext4. The essential “problem” is that ext4 implements something called delayed allocation.

The Free Beer Economy

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: Why is FREE! the world's best-selling noun, verb, adjective and adverb, yet so hard to credit as a foundation for business in the Internet Age? And what will happen when business folk finally grok the abundant opportunities that FREE! provides?

Russia Rolls Out Open Source for Government

Filed under
OSS

opendotdotdot.blogspot: Russia is rapidly turning into open source's best-kept secret. I wrote about plans to roll out free software to all schools; more recently, there has been talk about creating a Russian operating system based on Fedora. And now there's this:

Mozilla Contemplates a Future Without Google

Filed under
Moz/FF

businessweek.com: Google also shows up all over the balance sheet of Mozilla, creator of the Firefox browser and other software. To date, the arrangement has proved mutually beneficial. How much longer this pairing can last has been called into question since September.

the new look of plasma

Filed under
KDE

nowwhatthe.blogspot: Yesterday I updated KDE SVN. So, I have the latest dev stuff on my box again. Upon logging in, I was greeted by the new look of plasma.

Linux Has Worse Device Support Than Windows...I Don't Think So

Filed under
Linux

riplinton.blogspot: I was cleaning a virus out of a Windows XP system for a client when the UPS driver showed up with my latest gadget. The virus was one of the fake Anti-Virus viruses, you know, the kind that pops up all kinds of warnings.

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Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
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Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.

SUSE Launches Beta Program for SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing

While SUSE is working hard on the major SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 release, they recently announced that the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing (HPC) platform is now a dedicated SUSE Linux Enterprise product based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, available for public testing on 64-bit and ARM 64-bit architectures. SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 will introduce numerous new features and improvements, including a brand new installer that offers a single unified method to install one of the supported SUSE Linux Enterprise products, including the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing module, which comes with a set of components used in high-performance computing environments. Read more Also: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Prepares HPC Module