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Thursday, 19 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mesa Now Supports Another OpenGL 4.5 Extension Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 2:27pm
Story LibreOffice 4.3 (PC) review: A powerful but dated Office clone Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 2:17pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 11:23am
Story Open source forms the backbone of the most significant projects Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 11:07am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 9:24am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 9:23am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 9:22am
Story Kids Are Learning to Code With a Slice of Raspberry Pi Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 9:09am
Story Need a Cheap Chromebook? Here’s How to Pick One Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 9:04am
Story Raspberry Pi was created to solve talent crisis at Cambridge: Eben Upton [Interview] Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:53am

A Non-insider's Guide to Free and Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

sharplinux.blogspot: For years I have been using and, in some cases, promoting "open source" software, but until a few months ago, I really couldn't have told you what is really behind that idea. I knew vaguely, but since neither I nor anyone I know actually would delve into the source code (at least not at this point), what does it matter?

Microsoft Joins the ASF: Can They Be Trusted?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

ostatic.com: Microsoft announced on Friday that it would be joining the Apache Software Foundation, which costs $100,000/year and is the highest level of sponsorship that the foundation offers. Bruce Perens, a well-known open-source advocate, cautioned on Slashdot that "there's much reason for caution."

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 263

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Guest Review: NimbleX 2008

  • News: Mandriva's 10th Birthday, Fedora 9 Re-Spins, openSUSE PromoDVD, and Foxconn Crippled BIOS
  • Released last week: NimbleX 2008, Foresight 2.0.4, and DragonFly BSD 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Musix 2008-7, sidux 2008-03, and Draco 0.3.2
  • Mini Review: Parted Magic 3.0
  • Reviewed last week: NimbleX 2008, Vector 5.9 SOHO
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly...

Novell's OpenSUSE Version 11 is definitely stacked--maybe too much

Filed under
SUSE

crn.com: Ubuntu 8.04 and Fedora 9 have made great strides in making desktop Linux more user-friendly and technologically advanced. With OpenSUSE 11, Novell Inc. can match them feature for feature.

Traveling Success with Linux

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I have spent the past four days on a short vacation in the Piedmont area of northwest Italy. This has given me the opportunity to make a "traveling test" of Linux on both of my laptops. During this trip I have tried Ubuntu, Kubuntu, and Mandriva.

today's leftovers (part deux)

Filed under
News
  • Cloud Computing Could Invite Data Lock-In

  • Run Linux? Save the World, Please.
  • disabling the annoying system beep in linux
  • Make Your Ubuntu Desktop Rotate As a Cylinder/Sphere
  • Sun releases web stack

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter -- 28 July 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org/news: Welcome to the July issue of the Gentoo monthly newsletter! Since our last issue, Gentoo Linux 2008.0 has been released and the Gentoo Security Team held a meeting on July 14, 2008. In howtos: this guide will show you a method for trying to recover just about any deleted file.

openSUSE at OSCON

Filed under
SUSE

zonker.opensuse.org: I can’t believe OSCON is over already. It seems like the week flew by, probably because there was almost zero downtime from the time I arrived in Portland until the time I went to the airport.

Foxconn, ACPI fail, and leaving money on the table

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Matthew Garrett writes, "Linux hasn't claimed to be Linux in response to OSI queries since 2.6.24." With the current kernel.org Linux pretending to be Windows 2000, XP, Server 2003, or Vista, as a motherboard vendor you could just "not support Linux." What a mess. Why support Linux at all?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Running Quicken Premier 2008 on Linux with Wine

  • How to configure DSL in Fedora Linux
  • Eye Candy in Ubuntu 8.04 - Hardy Heron
  • Our LTSP hackfest effort: KIWI-LTSP 0.4.3 with Live USB and CD support
  • mkinitrd for XFS
  • Google Earth on Gentoo (inspite of Digest error)
  • Open Web Foundation to Play Freedom Cop for Net Specs
  • Videos: Dolphin, Gwenview & More in KDE 4.1
  • Ubuntu on Atom: coming soon to a subnotebook near you

OpenSolaris

Filed under
OS

blog-linux.com: Until now I worked exclusively with Linux, I had no experience with other UNIX operating systems. At the weekend I had a bit of time and I decided to make a little experiment - install Open Solaris on my desktop computer.

How to: Installing and running Ubuntu on the Eee PC

Filed under
HowTos

arstechnica.com: When the Asus Eee PC came out last year, we found that the eeextremely eeenticing subnotebook had the potential to be a real game-changer. Indeed, the diminutive wonder has spawned countless imitation products from a wide range of other vendors.

Ubuntu Netbook Remix on the Asus EEE PC

Filed under
Ubuntu

greenhughes.com: I finally took the plunge the other day and decided to wipe the operating system that came with my EEE PC and install Ubuntu Netbook Remix, and I'm very glad I did! I've been using it for a few days now and am really pleased with it.

Linus Torvalds on Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

oreilly.com: 10 days ago Linux creator Linus Torvalds gave an interview in which he talked about what he likes and doesn't like in a Linux distribution:

An Introduction to the Linux Command Line

Filed under
Linux

makeuseof.com: A command line is a method of interacting with your computer that involves typing commands (that is, words and phrases that have meaning to the computer) to make it do things. Command line interfaces replaced punch card systems back in the 1950’s and subsequently made room for GUIs.

X3 Game For Linux Still In Development

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix: Since January of 2007, Linux Game Publishing (LGP) has been working on porting X3: Reunion over to Linux. This game is the sequel to X2: The Threat, which was ported by this Linux game company already. X3: Reunion was scheduled to be released a year ago on the 1st of August.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #101

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 101 for the weeks July 20th - July 26th, 2008 is now available. In this issue: Intrepid Alpha 3 released, Ubuntu Screencasts, and Ubuntu Stats, and much, much more!

Fedora NA - Regional Ambassadors

Filed under
Linux

fedoratutorials.com: One of the things I’ve been working pretty heavily on the past couple weeks is getting more involved in the Fedora Ambassador program. And let’s just say its been a blast. I love the new direction of the North American Ambassador program and am excited to be a part of the newly rejuvenated program.

Further Foxconn fun

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

mjg59.livejournal: Ryan kindly sent me a copy of the ACPI tables for his motherboard, so I've had the opportunity to look at them in a little more detail. There's nothing especially surprising. The first method of interest is OSFL.

Dont Preach Linux. Just Mention it

Filed under
Linux

dogbuntu.wordpress: A lot of Linux users especially the ones who are newly finding their feet and have become recent converts of Linux get far too enthusiastic about the joys and benefits they experience after they have converted to Linux. They get excited and try to convert as many people as possible to their favourite OS. These people just get far too excited and end up trying to force people to Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.