Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Perfect Media Server - Ubuntu 11.10 falko 23/02/2012 - 11:40am
Blog entry A phone, a Dock, a thin Client.. Thanks Ubuntu.. fieldyweb 22/02/2012 - 10:12pm
Story LibreOffice 3.5 review srlinuxx 22/02/2012 - 8:29pm
Story Kernel Log: Coming in 3.3 (Part 2) - Filesystems and storage srlinuxx 22/02/2012 - 8:26pm
Story Funny stuff what I encountered srlinuxx 22/02/2012 - 7:19pm
Story If Linux Is Dead...this Is a Zombie Apocalypse! srlinuxx 22/02/2012 - 5:39pm
Story WordGrinder: Good, Old-Fashioned Text Editing Power srlinuxx 22/02/2012 - 5:07pm
Story KDE 4.8 Review | LAS | s20e07 srlinuxx 22/02/2012 - 5:04pm
Story VLC Player 2.0 released srlinuxx 2 22/02/2012 - 8:37am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 22/02/2012 - 6:30am

Installing And Working With Xoops Under Ubuntu 6.10

Filed under

I want to show you how to install Xoops on Ubuntu. I used the Ubuntu 6.10 Server Edition, but it will probably work on other systems as well. Xoops is a modern

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 208

Filed under

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Commentary: One year with Puppy Linux
  • News: Localised distributions, Gutsy Gibbon features, product-creator module for YaST, PCLinuxOS Control Center, backporting kernel patches

  • Released last week: Mandriva Corporate Desktop 4.0, MoLinux 3.0
  • Upcoming releases: Alt Linux 4.0, Ubuntu 7.10 Alpha 2
  • New distribution: Hacao Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

One File System to Rule Them All

Filed under

Raiden's Realm: If there's one thing that drives me nuts about the current operating system models is that there is no one single file system that works across all operating systems, fills all the needs of everyone out there and is stable beyond mention to boot.

Linux becomes mature and achieves excellence

Filed under

People's Daily Online: In recent years, the world's leading software and hardware providers such as IBM and Intel are rushing to do compatibility testing and quality authentication with China's local Linux products.

3D desktops—Beryl, Compiz and more

Filed under

freesoftwaremagazine: Some would say 3D desktops are useless fluff; some swear by them. This article gives you an overview of today’s 3D desktop options, and how they can help you be more productive.

Linux: Rewriting the Buffer Layer

Filed under

kernelTRAP: Posting a series of three patches, Nick Piggin announced that he was working on a rewrite of the buffer layer which he calls fsblock, "the name is fsblock because it basically ties the fs layer to the block layer." As to just what the buffer layer is, Nick explained.

Vista's failures explained

Filed under

the Inquirer: DEAR MICROSOFT, Please stop your whining, it is getting quite annoying. We do realise you have an OS called MeII (aka Vista) and it isn't selling. Please accept my sympathies but not my dollars, you lost me and all my clients as a customer. I am going Linux now.

Distribution Checklist: Part 1 of 3

Filed under

Josh Saddler: As promised in a previous entry, here's the first half of a checklist I've been writing to help me evaluate other distributions. No doubt I think of more things when examining a distro, but here's a good start. For this first part of the series, I'll question the distribution's hardware support and its package manager.

Google and Linux Join Forces for Google OS

Filed under

OSWeekly: In the past, we have explored the reality that, in many forms, the much anticipated "Google OS" has long since already arrived. But recently, there have been strong indicators that Google may be positioning for something more. And today, we will explore what this might look like if it were to actually happen.

Microsoft, Linux Distros Get Cozy: Let’s Get Scared

Filed under

OSWeekly: First we had Novell jumping onboard with Microsoft, and then came a cooperative deal with Xandros. Now we have Linspire following the trend and I’m left wondering: should we be worried? Many of you may point out that it is merely a handful of companies, but I see this differently. I see this as Microsoft trying to worm their way into the Linux market without making any real solid commitment to the users themselves.

The find and locate Commands Help You Uncover the Files You are Looking for

Filed under
HowTos find is a powerful command line tool for identifying sets of files based on their names. With locate you can quickly find all files containing a given string.

openSUSE 10.2 - A Review

Filed under

shift+backspace: Recently there has been plenty of news regarding the alpha releases of the next openSUSE release, 10.3. While I will be taking a look at the Alpha 5 or Alpha 6 release in the near future, many users have requested a review of openSUSE 10.2.

Fun with GStreamer Audio effects

Filed under

gnomejournal: Stefan Kost describes GStreamer features that have been implemented and that are in the works, and he steps users through setting up an example with which to play.

The Guide to 100% Linux/KDE Desktop Success

Filed under

Peter P. Parker: This is a guide on how Linux and especially the KDE desktop could revolutionize the world of computers and operating systems and bring a major breakthrough so Linux would go mainstream.

Mark Shuttleworth’s Ubuntu perspective

Filed under

Alan Zeichick Weblog: If the Linux community has a hero other than Linus Torvalds, it’s Mark Shuttleworth, a dot-com gazillionaire who started the Ubuntu Project, and who funds it out of his own pocket.

Free software wars re-ignite

Filed under

financialexpress: The world of corporate computing seems to be preparing for a paradigm shift. Free and open source software movement claims to be making fresh inroads into corporates. Microsoft has also upped its ante, claiming lower cost of ownership and the patents open source software violates.

Report from MTLC's 2nd Annual Open Source Summit in Boston

Filed under

Groklaw: A Groklaw member who attended last week's Second Annual Open Source Summit in Boston has written up a report for us. He describes what each panel or talk was about, so you will know which you want to listen to.

Gwenview progress

Filed under
Software In case you missed it, Gwenview has moved to kdegraphics. The KDE4 port of Gwenview is more a rewrite than a port, at least from the user perspective. It's already usable in its current state.

Upgrading ALSA drivers, libraries and utilities on Linux

Filed under
HowTos I have notebook with a Intel HDA soundchip, it was not fully supported by the alsa 1.0.13 drivers that came with openSuSE 10.2 and no updated RPM’s was available. so I manually had to upgrade them to 1.0.14.

Jupiter is born

Filed under

A week ago we announced our intention to pull together what we (in those ancient days), termed as “LASnix” (aka “Linux Action Show *nix”). We’ve also decided on an official name for the project, that being “Jupiter.”

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.