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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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X/OS is an undistinguished Red Hat clone

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: X/OS Linux is a distribution built from Red Hat Enterprise Linux sources. Its developers claim it was created "to provide a hassle-free enterprise-class Linux operating system without usage terms tied to commercial services." I downloaded it expecting I might find all the refinement of Red Hat along with some improvements and the community one expects to find growing around free software. It seems I set my expectations too high.

KDE and Distributions: ALT Linux Interview

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Interviews

dot.kde.org: As part of our KDE and Distributions series (1, 2, 3, 4) KDE Dot News spoke to representatives from Alt Linux. Russia recently announced plans to include GNU/Linux in every school in the country, and ALT Linux hopes to be the chosen distribution. Below CEO Alexey Smirnov and Andrey Cherepanov answer our questions about their relationship with KDE.

KDE development platform appears

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KDE

arstechnica: This Wednesday in KDE land sees the start of the Release Freeze for KDE 4.0, anticipating a final release in December. By then, KDE 4 will have been in development for two years and five months, counting from the aKademy conference in Malaga, Spain, in July 2005.

Why isn't Xfce's layout easier to change?

Filed under
Software

beranger: I might have irrational expectations, but once you can change the layout of some desktop environment "the easy way" — i.e. by using the mouse, not by manually editing config files —, shouldn't you be able to experience some ease with that?

Share a Firefox Profile Between Ubuntu and Windows

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HowTos

cybernet: One of the new things in Ubuntu 7.10 is the ability to read and write to NTFS formatted drives, which is great for Windows XP and Vista users. What that means is that you can create a Firefox profile in Windows and set it up so that Ubuntu uses the exact same profile.

South Africa adopts ODF as govt standard

Filed under
OSS

tectonic: Open Document format (ODF) yesterday became an official standard for South African government communications.

Howto : Make Flash Player 9 Work In Full Screen Mode

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HowTos

tuxicity.wordpress: On most distros the Stable version of Flash: 9.0.48.0 is available. To get Flash Player 9 to work in full screen mod mode you need Flash, build 9.0.64.0 , a prerelease of the next version of Flash. To get the prerelease of Flash you need to go to adobe.labs.com.

"Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks"...Why care?

Its amazing what people are willing to do for ad-dollars nowadays. Don't fall for the trick that tech journalists use!

Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks - Part3

Filed under
Ubuntu

Infoworld blogs: It's a rite of passage. All new Linux users must face that ultimate test of courage and conviction: Fixing a broken video card configuration. One minor slip-up - selecting an unsupported resolution, choosing the wrong screen model - and Bam!

ATI 8.43.3 on openSUSE - the hard way

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HowTos

CyberOrg: Much awaited ATI 8.43.3 drivers are finally available. Here is what you need to do to get them working on openSUSE 10.3. Step 1. Get all requirements:

Linux v2.6.24-rc1 "humongous"

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Linux

lkmltimes.brucalipto.org: Linus Torvalds has just released the first release candidate of the upcoming 2.6.24 Linux kernel: “This may count as one of the biggest -rc releases ever. This one is eleven megs!

Add a directory to your PATH

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HowTos

/dev/loki: As it's a recurring question, here is how to add one or more directories to your PATH (on openSUSE, but applies more or less to other distributions as well). Note that I assume you're using bash as your shell.

Learn and teach geometry and algebra with GeoGebra

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Software

linux.com: GeoGebra, a GPL-licensed teaching and learning tool that integrates geometry, algebra, and calculus, benefits both teachers and students alike. GeoGebra constructs geometrical figures and demonstrates the relationship between geometry and algebra. GeoGebra can help you create interactive demonstrations and precise images of geometric figures for inclusion in teaching and testing materials.

GIMP 2.4.0 Officially Released

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GIMP

GIMP 2.4.0 is released and celebrated with a new look for gimp.org. Developers, artists and user interface designers from all over the world worked together to make GIMP more powerful and easier to use than ever.

Building a custom kernel in Freebsd

Filed under
BSD
HowTos

Raiden's Realm: If you've run Freebsd for a while, you're likely by now interested in streamlining its operation a bit by building a custom kernel. While a generic kernel allows for easier portability of your install should something happen to the hardware, a custom kernel allows you greater speed by removing unnecessary configurations and options from the kernel.

short takes and left overs

Filed under
News
  • Quick KDE 4 Post

  • Game icons
  • How to change the Debian Menu Icon
  • The mythical (open-source) man month?
  • I Was Wrong: Microsoft Won
  • Query your processes under X with Qps
  • Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Update and Verizon Mobile Broadband
  • NVIDIA Releases Updated 2D "NV" Driver
  • Howto: Remove the brown background color during login
  • My Opinion on OpenSUSE and Ubuntu

OLPC looks for manufacturing scale, targets deep-pocketed donors

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OLPC

arstechnica: The One Laptop Per Child Foundation is now targeting deep-pocketed donors for its OLPC XO laptop. A new initiative launched by the group is actively looking for charitable foundations, not-for-profit organizations, and wealthy philanthropists to give the OLPC XO a boost.

The real reasons why Linux is “behind” Windows on the desktop.

Filed under
Linux

hackfud.net: Every day I seem to read some article on-line which has some sentiment to the effect of “Linux is behind Windows on the desktop”, or, “Is Linux ready for the desktop?” , or “Linux isn’t ready for the desktop!”. The main, number one reason;
Microsoft.

Reiser trial delayed by National TV show

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Reiser

insidebayarea.com: Opening statements in the trial of computer science engineer Hans Reiser on charges he murdered his wife, Nina Reiser, have been delayed by at least a week because of concerns about potential prejudicial information in an upcoming national television show about his case.

Basic Linux Tips and Tricks, Part 3

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Planet: Part 1 of this article provided the general background a reader needs to solve problems with Linux. Part 2 of this article discussed the process of solving Linux problems. In this final part of a three-part series, we'll step through a real-world example of solving a Linux problem.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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