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Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenMandriva's "Get a Face" Finalists Chosen srlinuxx 16/03/2013 - 2:55am
Story Linux Mint Debian 201303 RC Sneak Peek srlinuxx 16/03/2013 - 12:15am
Story Enlightenment desktop – Yes or no? srlinuxx 16/03/2013 - 12:08am
Story Shell Game srlinuxx 15/03/2013 - 10:35pm
Story Move Over GIMP, Here Comes Krita srlinuxx 15/03/2013 - 10:31pm
Story Kali Linux 1.0 review srlinuxx 15/03/2013 - 10:27pm
Story In Pictures: A visual history of Linux srlinuxx 15/03/2013 - 8:02pm
Story DesktopBSD brought back to life srlinuxx 15/03/2013 - 8:01pm
Story OpenSUSE 12.3: Proof not all Linux are bonkers srlinuxx 15/03/2013 - 6:43pm
Story few leftovers: srlinuxx 15/03/2013 - 5:27am

Unix fundamentals - compiling software from scratch

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: Installing software. It’s something that you do quite a lot if you’re like most computer users. On Unix-like systems, there are several different ways you be getting that program however - it’s not necessarily a simple case of double-clicking one setup file. One of these ways is to download the program’s source code and compile it yourself.

Who's writing Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld: The Linux kernel project's "git" revision control tool offers up some numbers on which developers, and which companies, contributed the most code to Linux, and who's reviewing other people's code.

Tiny Linux Redux

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "Recently, the CE Linux forum has been working to revive the Linux-tiny project," stated Tim Bird on the Linux Kernel mailing list, adding that Michael Opdenacker has been selected as the project's new primary maintainer.

Also: Continued Atheros Discussions

knetworkmanager with TKIP/AES-CCMP support and GNOME 2.20

Filed under
Software

liquidat: A week ago Helmut Schaa submitted a set of changes to knetworkmanager. It now supports to chose the different security protocols used together with WPA. In other news the GNOME team released their desktop in the newest version, 2.20.

First U.S. GPL lawsuit filed

Filed under
Legal

linux-watch: Normally, GPL violations have been settled by letters from the FSF (Free Software Foundation) or other open-source organizations, pointing out the violation. For the first time in the U.S., a company, multimedia device and software vendor Monsoon Multimedia, is being taken to court for a GPL violation.

Linux: understanding it takes time

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Linux users tend to get all excited when a mainstream publication picks up any distribution and deems it worthy of review - even if the conclusions of the reviewer concerned turn out to be negative.

Printing Trends in Linux

Filed under
Linux

O'Reilly ONLamp: What technology has to work right out of the box, but requires cooperation among a dozen companies and even more independent developers? If you answered printing, you probably remember the tussles you've had with this technology on Linux or Unix systems.

Jury selection starts in trial of Han Reiser

Filed under
Reiser

mercurynews.com (AP): Lawyers on Wednesday began questioning potential jurors in the trial of a software engineer charged with killing his estranged wife, who went missing about a year ago.

NVIDIA 100.14.19 + 8800GTS 640MB

Filed under
Software

phoronix: This past Tuesday NVIDIA finally delivered an updated Linux and Solaris display driver (100.14.19). This new software release does, however, contain a number of fixes especially for the GeForce 8 series. We benchmarked a GeForce 8800GTS 640MB with the previous 100.14.11 display driver and then the new 100.14.19 driver release. The performance regression fix is very apparent!

Also: Black Window Bug Fixed?

Why Linux Is Already A Success

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: Anyone who reads InformationWeek regularly probably knows by now that my colleague Alexander Wolfe has more than a few pithy things to say about Linux with his piece 7 Reasons Why Linux Won’t Succeed on the Desktop. After reading it, I thought: Does Linux really need to succeed on the desktop? Maybe the truth is that Linux is already a success.

GNOME 2.20 shows significant improvement

Filed under
Software

linux.com: GNOME 2.20 was released yesterday. Even though I use GNOME regularly, I normally don't get excited over new releases. This time, though, GNOME has a solid list of new features and upgrades. It's worth taking a look at even if you aren't a fan of this desktop environment.

Also: Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: SUSE-Polished GNOME 2.20

What fun things can you do with Linux?

Filed under
Gaming

tuxtoday: So, you are thinking about installing Linux, but you’re a bit worried about getting bored? What about games? Good News! There are a lot of awesome games for Linux.

Divining from the Entrails of Ubuntu's Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

datamation: According to the 2007 DesktopLinux.com survey, Ubuntu is the distribution of choice for 30% of GNU/Linux users. The exact figure is questionable, but Ubuntu's dominance is not. At times, I wondered whether the popularity might be preventing Ubuntu from finishing some rough edges.

KDE and Xorg, Fonts and DPI

Filed under
HowTos

yalb: Today, I’d like to share a tip I found out while working with a beta release for a distribution of Linux with KDE’s 3.5.7 version. So let’s take a look at how you can force KDE to run at the correct DPI for your monitor which will, in turn, make your fonts look MUCH better.

PC-BSD Day 15: PAMP your website

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: One application that always finds its way to my desktop is Apache-MySQL-PHP in one of its incarnations. MAMP for Mac OSX, XAMPP for Windows XP and my portable USB drive and LAMP for my Ubuntu box. In the latter case -and on *BSD- it shouldn’t be necessary to work with an *AMP package. Installing the various component via the software repositories or packages is a matter of entering the proper commands.

My *buntu won't update!

Filed under
Ubuntu

ittoolbox blogs: In terms of updating and upgrading your operating system and all other installed programs Linux (and BSD) would have to be about the best thing since sliced bread. Sometimes for unknown reasons or known reasons the packages fail.

The overestimated Death of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

blog of Gentoo: For the last couple of days I've been reading about the so called Death of the Linux Desktop. What I cannot understand is, how so Linux desktop can be dead if it never existed?

Xen With Graphical User Interface On A Fedora 7 Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up Xen on Fedora 7. Xen enables the paravirtualization of your hardware for its virtual machines if you have a CPU with Vanderpool (Intel) or Pacifica (AMD) technology.

Commercial Software Will Include Open Source, Gartner Says

Filed under
OSS

eWeek: At least 80 percent of all commercial software products will include elements of open-source code by 2010, according to Mark Driver, vice president of research at Gartner. IT organizations will have to manage open-source software along with commercial software.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Recipes and Outreachy

  • Recipes for you and me
    Since I’ve last written about recipes, we’ve started to figure out what we can achieve in time for GNOME 3.24, with an eye towards delivering a useful application. The result is this plan, which should be doable.
  • Outreachy (GNOME)-W5&W6
    My plan was altered in this two-week, because the strings of GNOME 3.24 have not frozen yet and the maintainers of Chinese localization group told me the Extra GNOME Applications are more necessary to be translated than documents, so I began to translate the Extra GNOME Applications (stable) during this period.
  • [Older] Outreachy (GNOME)-W3&W4
    During this period, I finished the UI translation of GNOME 3.22, I’m waiting to reviewed and committed now, and I met some troubles and resolved them these days.

Home Recording with Ubuntu Studio Part One: Gearing Up

Twenty years ago, the cost of building a studio for the creation of electronic music was pricey, to say the least. The cost of a computer that was suitable for multimedia production could cost the average musician between $1,000 and $2,000. Add in the cost of recording software, additional instruments and equipment, and one could easily spend between $5,000 and $10,000 just to get started. But nowadays, you do not have to break the bank to start making music at home. The price of personal computers has dropped substantially over the past two decades. At the time of this writing, it is possible to get a notebook PC that’s suitable for audio production for around $500. Other pieces of equipment have also dropped in price, making it possible to build a functional recording studio for around $1,000. (Read the rest)

Leftovers: Gaming

Red Hat and Fedora