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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Moto G Goes Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:47pm
Story How to make the brave move from commercial to open source Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:31pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:29pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:25pm
Story GParted 0.17 Supports Online Resizing Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:17pm
Story Open Source, Closed Doors? FOSS and the Racial Divide Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 7:54pm
Story GCC Support Arrives For The ARM Cortex-A12 Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 7:48pm
Story What open source gadget is at the top of your holiday wishlist? Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 7:44pm
Story Give that old computer a boost with antiX Linux Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 7:38pm
Story SolydXK hands on: Two good Linux distributions with a solid base Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 7:04pm

Poor typecasting

Filed under
Linux

manilastandardtoday.com: MODERN desktop Linux systems excel in many things, but font management is not one of them. Over the weekend, I brought home some OpenType fonts, eager to install them on my MacBook and my Linux desktop computer.

In Search of the GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Glyn Moody: It is generally accepted that 2008 will be the year of the GNU/Linux desktop – just like 2007, 2006 and all the years before them. But jokes aside, there is clearly something obsessive about the open source world's preoccupation with the desktop.

Virtual Users And Domains With Postfix, Courier And MySQL (CentOS 5.1)

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database.

Today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Remove Mono dependancy from Ubuntu

  • Red Hat's Open Source IDE
  • “I’d suggest Linux - but..” - I’d suggest you get a clue, but..
  • Hands on with Android: XML Parsing
  • Hospital software vendor McKesson uses Linux to heal IT budgets
  • ALSA's snd-oxygen For C-Media CMI8788 APUs
  • Daniel Robbins: And even more new Gentoo stages...
  • Process wakeups on GNOME 2.18
  • Seven Predictions for 2008

Test: Do Linux filesystems need defragmentation?

Filed under
Linux

lxer.com: When I started using Linux, I was told that with Linux I didn't need to defragment my filesystems anymore, since Linux filesystems don't get fragmented in first place. I still wondered how on earth it was possible the 100k+ files in Gentoo's portage system - updated every time I synchronize the portage tree - didn't fragment my filesystem. Or was my filesystem fragmented and did I not know?

Microsoft Office benched by Dutch government in favor of OpenOffice?

Filed under
OOo

tech.blorge.com: Though Microsoft has held a sturdy grip on the throat of government and corporate software for quite a while, the Dutch government is looking to pry away the bony fingers of Microsoft’s restrictive formatting; Dutch parliament will discuss mandating Open Document Formatting this Wednesday…hello, OpenOffice!

Puppy Linux 3.01 Review

Filed under
Linux

OSWeekly: I just finished taking the latest version of Puppy Linux for a spin and was planning on doing a review. However, considering this was on my notebook, that meant connecting to the Internet, preferably via wireless.

Microsoft Tight-Lipped On Unix Ownership Question

Filed under
Microsoft

informationweek.com/blog: For months, I've been trying to get Microsoft to answer a few questions about the Unix technologies in its intellectual property portfolio. Microsoft agreed to an interview, then backed out. So the question remains: How much Unix code does Microsoft have its hands on?

The Free Software Foundation's "High Priority" List: A Key Guidepost

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Every couple of years, someone compiles a list of programs that GNU/Linux needs to compete on the desktop. However, if you really want to track the most pressing needs for a free desktop, the most useful indicator is probably the Free Software Foundation's (FSF'S) list of High Priority Free Software Projects.

"Cloudbook" UMPC to run Googlish Linux

Filed under
Linux

LinuxDevices: Everex has confirmed plans to ship a UMPC (ultra-mobile PC) with a 7-inch screen, similar to competitor Asus's EEE PC. A source close to the company revealed that the device -- codenamed "Cloudbook" -- will ship with the Google Apps-oriented "gOS" Linux distribution early next year.

Silly little gmrun

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I think I may have found the program that actually does the least I’ve ever seen … short of things like cowsay. I forget what I was looking for, but I installed gmrun last night and tried it. This is what I got.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using a Bluetooth phone with Linux

  • Encrypt A File with GPG
  • Schedule And Automate tasks in Ubuntu
  • OOo: Doing page numbers with alternating pagination
  • Securing your VNC connection using SSH
  • Filter mail with powerful procmail
  • Create a Search Bar for Epiphany
  • Backing up a MySQL Database Using Cron
  • How To: Automate SSH Sessions Without Passwords
  • HowTo Backup and Restore Partitions Using CloneZilla or Partimage
  • Real world Linux programming
  • HowTo: Install 113 Amazing Fedora Games, Parts 2-8
  • Quickzi: Keep mounted drives off the Ubuntu Desktop

Eight features you didn’t know about in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

richbradshaw.wordpress: Ubuntu has caused GNU/Linux based operating systems to have many reviews recently, most concentrating on the more flashy parts such as the infamous rotating cube or wobbly windows provided by compiz fusion, rather than the things that actually make it such a enjoyable operating system to use.

New Flash player for Linux adds great features, slows playback

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux: It's good news, bad news situation when it comes to Adobe's new Flash player for Linux. On the plus side, Adobe Flash Player 9 Update 3, version identifier 9.0.115.0 was made available for Linux at the same time as Mac and Windows versions. It will, however, take a while for much of that content to appear in a format that you can get at.

Hans Reiser Said Wife, Family 'Were a Financial Burden,' Witness Says

Filed under
Reiser

wired: Two witnesses testified Monday at Hans Reiser's murder trial that the Linux programmer's wife and family were a burden, and that he would be better off without them.

Nemo file manager organizes around a calendar

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Nemo is the latest effort to provide a new paradigm for file managers. Its approach, at least in its first early development release, is to combine file management with calendar views.

KDE 4: like a dream on 256Mb/1Ghz/Intel

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: So someone just asked in #kde4-devel whether it was worth trying KDE 4 on a 2500Mhz/256Mb computer and I was characteristically careful and guessed "It will work, but won't be good.". Then I decided to put my money where my mouth is.

Linux Media Player Roundup - Part 7 - Finale

Filed under
Software

raiden's realm: Welcome to the last part of our Linux media player roundup. Today we'll be covering VLC, XMMS, Xfmedia, Xine and one more previously missed media player, the "Listen Media Player".

KDE takes stand on OOXML; GNOME dithers

Filed under
OSS

iTWire: Three cheers for the developers and management of the K Desktop Environment. They have taken a principled stand on the divisive issue of OOXML, the Microsoft Office Open XML document format. And for this the KDE folk deserve a round of applause.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Still at It

5 open source RSS feed readers

When Google Reader was discontinued four years ago, many "technology experts" called it the end of RSS feeds. And it's true that for some people, social media and other aggregation tools are filling a need that feed readers for RSS, Atom, and other syndication formats once served. But old technologies never really die just because new technologies come along, particularly if the new technology does not perfectly replicate all of the use cases of the old one. The target audience for a technology might change a bit, and the tools people use to consume the technology might change, too. Read more

Leftovers: Software and OSS

  • 10 Portable Apps Every Linux User Should Use
    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive. In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat! Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.
  • Linux Watch Command, To Monitor a Command Activity
    Recently i came to know about watch command, from one of my friend when i have a different requirement. I got good benefit from watch command and i want to share with you people to get more benefit on it, when you have a problem on Linux system.
  • Gammu 1.38.2
    Yesterday Gammu 1.38.2 has been released. This is bugfix release fixing for example USSD or MMS decoding in some situations. The Windows binaries are available as well. These are built using AppVeyor and will help bring Windows users back to latest versions.
  • How a lifecycle management tool uses metrics
    Greg Sutcliffe is a long-time member and now community lead of the Foreman community. Foreman is a lifecycle management tool for physical and virtual servers. He's been studying how the real-world application of community metrics gives insight into its effectiveness and discovering the gap that exists between the ideal and the practical. He shares what insights he's found behind the numbers and how he is using them to help the community grow. In this interview, Sutcliffe spoke with me about the metrics they are using, how they relate to the community's goals, and which ones work best for them. He also talks about his favorite tooling and advice for other community managers looking to up their metrics game.
  • Build a private blockchain ecosystem in minutes with this open source project Join our daily free Newsletter
  • Becoming an Agile Leader, Part 5: Learning to Learn
    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.
  • Is Scratch today like the Logo of the '80s for teaching kids to code?
    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time. Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.