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About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Easy Cross Platform File Sharing With KPF

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Nosredna Ekim: For those Linux users who have multiple networked computers and who want to periodically want to get material off of their linux boxes onto their windows computer, many people suggest samba. A much simpler application for someone who does not want to tranfer files the other direction (Windows->Linux) is KPF.

After 10 years: What is Open Source?

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OSS In our earlier article, "Facts and Friction on Open Source and Free Software" we have explained where "Open Source" is coming from and what is its relation to Free Software and the Free Software Foundation that represents it. Well, enter 2007.

Windows share as seen by Mac OS X Leopard

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radr: A friend of mine got his copy of Leopard and it looks like the Apple team dropped a funny easter egg when viewing a Windows share.

Look closely

Why Red Hat doesn't need a deal with Microsoft

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Linux The trade press reported a lot of rumors this past week about the chances for a patent protection pact between Red Hat and Microsoft similar to the agreements Microsoft negotiated with Novell, Xandros, and Linspire. Red Hat doesn't appear to be interested in the least. Here's why.

Open XML/ODF translation work progresses

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desktoplinux: What does Xandros get out of its recent deal with Microsoft? Well, for one thing, the well-known Linux desktop distributor will get Open XML/ODF translators for OpenOffice.

Goldman Sachs: Linux Will Dominate in the Corporate Data Center - and a Tip for Them

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Groklaw: There's a very interesting paper published by Goldman Sachs and posted by Hewlett Packard, Fear the Penguin [PDF]. You will recall that both companies sent representatives to speak about how wonderful it all was on the day Microsoft and Novell announced their deal. According to the paper, Linux is going to take over the corporate data center.

Syllable Whisper Alpha8 released

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The Syllable team are pleased to announce that Whisper Alpha8 is now available! This release adds support for inbound message filter and a new Events API that can be used by other applications to control Whisper.

How-To: Unattended Ubuntu Deployment over Network

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HowTos If you intent to deploy Ubuntu over several computers, this can easily become cumbersome. This tutorial will explain how to install Ubuntu/Debian through the network using preseed files so you can turn on your computer, walk away and come back later with your fresh install up and running.

KIWI - OpenSuse’s re-spin creator

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/home/liquidat: Everyone can easily create his own version of Fedora with the re-spin tool Revisor. OpenSuse also develops a tool with a similar purpose, KIWI.

Stable Full NTFS support in Linux at last!

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Irfan’s /root: Adding full read/write NTFS support to Linux has been a story of damaged reputations, data corruptions and human geniousity! Now after 12 years in development, there is a full driver at last!

How to revive an old PC

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the inquirer: ONE OF MY INTERESTS is in recycling and reusing older computers. With the right choice of software, even a five-year-old computer can be a fast, responsive machine with bags of life left in it.

The Distros Microsoft Missed

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Linux Today: Like most of you, I was more than a little surprised when Linspire decided to join the Microsoft patent protection ring. I wrote some scary predictions about how all of these deals were going to cast a perceptual shadow on the "non-protected" Linux distributions.

Say good-bye to NewsForge

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Web Earlier this week we launched a revamped version of that combines the best of NewsForge and, along with new features such as forums and introductory material for new Linux users. Please visit for the latest news and features.

KDE e.V. Quarterly Report 2007Q1 Now Available

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KDE The KDE e.V. Quarterly Report is now available for Q1 2007, covering January, February and March 2007.

Ubuntu root access

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earobinson: The other day it was pointed out to me that a “flaw” was that if ubuntu was booted into recovery mode that the user was then given root access without the need of a password.

Running Ubuntu: 5 First Impressions

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allaboutubuntu: I’ve finally had a chance to run my Ubuntu PC from Dell. I can see why the systems aren’t quite ready for all users. But it’s clear to me that Ubuntu will be able to serve a large segment of the consumer population. In fact, Ubuntu is better than Windows in at least five areas. Here they are.

linux movie codecs and dvd experience

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pimpyourlinux: You’ve downloaded and installed Linux, but now you realize that you can’t play movies on it! This article will show you how to not only get your DVD player working in Ubuntu, but also how to get your favorite codecs.

Blender animations help prevent crime in Britain

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Software The Avon and Somerset Constabulary in Great Britain uses animations created with the open source tool Blender to help citizens understand how to protect their vehicles and possessions from theft.

Why Ubuntu was on the Windows Marketplace

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cybernetnews: Ubuntu Windows MarketPlaceThe Windows MarketPlace is known as the one-stop shop for all your Windows software and hardware needs. Ubuntu was being offered as a free download on the Windows Marketplace. How could such a thing happen?

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.