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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Teaching Programing Skills to Children with Logo

  • How to build aircrack-ng on openSUSE
  • Upgrading Multiple Debian Machines Quickly With approx
  • BleachBit to cleanup unwanted files on your openSUSE
  • View hidden files
  • prevent your SSH session from disconnecting in Linux
  • Dropbox on Ubuntu
  • Automate Your System Backup With Back In Time

Shuttle offer now Power-saving Nettop with SUSE Linux

Filed under
Hardware
SUSE

hitechreview.com: Shuttle is now expanding its portfolio of Mini-PCs with Open Source operating systems. The latest offshoot is the X270V complete system based on the Shuttle Barebone X27D.

PC-BSD 7.1 Galileo Edition Review

Filed under
BSD

theitmassive.com: PC-BSD 7.1 is a desktop operating system aimed at the normal user and is based on FreeBSD. It enables fast installation of software and getting a working desktop running fast.

BBC iPlayer goes high definition

Filed under
Software

bbc.co.uk: The BBC's iPlayer is to start offering high definition (HD) streams and downloads of some programmes, and a cross-platform manager that will allow Windows, Mac, and Linux users to download BBC programmes, including those in HD.

NSW Government not giving away Linux vs MS details

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: The Government has been far from forthcoming when it comes to revealing any details behind the New South Wales (NSW) laptop tender choices. There are unanswered questions.

Introducing KDE 4 - Kontact: To-do (KOrganizer)

Filed under
KDE

introducingkde4.blogspot: This is going to be a small overview, since the "To-Do" is in fact part of KOrganizer, which was mostly seen on the last article. It's just going be fast view at the main interface, the changes to the interface remain the same as on Calendar.

Top 5 Media Center Programs for Linux

Filed under
Software

thelinuxcauldron.wordpress: I though I would share my thoughts on my exploits with the popular Media Center Solutions for Linux. While none of them are perfect some come very close.

Linux In Your Ear: Getting Louder, Or Softer?

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: Time to revise another assessment. It looks like it isn't going to be a question of "will your next phone run Linux?" but "which Linux is it?" Between Android branching out into set-top boxes and both Panasonic and NEC pulling the covers off new LiMo-driven phones (and Motorola also in that running), the mobile market's becoming a Linux market ...

Also: Panasonic, NEC unveil 9 Linux phones

Fedora 11 Leonidas - King of Spartans

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: You may be wondering why I chose the particular title for this article. Well, you will learn soon. Today, we are going to test the latest (beta) release of the RedHat-based Fedora, version 11 named Leonidas, slated for release in mid-May.

Shuttleworth: Oracle a Litmus test for Linux, Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

internetnews.com: Ubuntu Linux 9.04 is set for release on April 23rd for both the server and the desktop, and though it will include many new features it will be lacking at least one key item -- Oracle certification.

Slicing and Dicing on the Command Line

Filed under
Linux

linux-mag.com: If you don’t know text, you don’t know Linux. There are a host of methods for reformatting plain text — including the text used by graphical applications like spreadsheets and email programs.

Can Open Source Songbird Compete with iTunes?

Filed under
Software

datamation.com: With the open source music player Songbird finally making its v1.0 debut this past December after two years in development, the big question swirling around Songbird continues to be whether or not this Mozilla-based player will be able to give iTunes a run for its money.

Death of Linux on netbooks greatly exaggerated

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

arstechnica.com: A Microsoft blogger says that the Windows operating system has achieved dominance in the netbook market. The statistics, however, are less definitive.

Can GNOME Regain the Evolutionary Advantage over KDE?

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: The Internet has a habit of making anything you say obsolete as soon as you say it. No sooner had I compared the future of the GNOME and KDE desktops than GNOME announced that a version 3.0 would be released after all.

The five best, new things in Ubuntu Linux 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.computerworld: I've been using Jaunty Jackalope--what a name!--for the last few weeks, and I upgraded to the release candidate last night the hard way, i.e. from the source code. I'm impressed.

fewer magical appearances

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: When desktop effects are enabled, extenders "roll up" and "roll back out" instead of just suddenly appearing and disappearing. This goes along with the idea of "organic interfaces" where things shouldn't exhibit magical behaviors:

Exciting changes in the 2.6.30 Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

hightechsorcery.com: Every Linux kernel release has interesting changes but 2.6.30 really stands out to me as having a lot of features I would like to take advantage.

Does a court ruling raise the risks of open source?

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: The model train business isn't exactly the font of software innovation. But a lawsuit over the rights to a hobbyist's code could be a huge boost for developers of open source programs. It could also make some businesses think again about using open source software.

Ubuntu Tech Support: It's All A Matter Of Timing

Filed under
Ubuntu

bmighty.com: The next Ubuntu Linux server release is on its way. If your company decides to give it a try, be sure that you also understand some important points about how Ubuntu handles long-term tech support.

10 (Latest) Beautiful Plasma Themes for KDE 4 Desktop

Filed under
KDE

junauza.com: Since a lot of you loved our collection of some of the most beautiful Plasma Themes for KDE 4 desktop, we decided to give you more. This time, we compiled the very latest.

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More in Tux Machines

How To Install Kali Linux In Android Phone

Thanks to the Linux deployment team now the great wall separating android users from kali has weakened and fallen. It has been a long journey integrating Linux system on advanced RISC machine devices. It started with Ubuntu and now we have a Kali version that can run on your android device. Isn't that great? Great indeed. Read
more

Zuul: Proven open-source continuous integration/continuous delivery

If you think Zuul is the Gatekeeper, demigod, and minion of the ancient Hittite god Gozer, then you're a Ghostbusters fan, too. But, if you're interested in continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) and not "human sacrifice, dogs, and cats living together... mass hysteria," then you want Zuul, OpenStack's open-source CI/CD platform. Zuul originally was developed for OpenStack CI testing. For years, OpenStack, the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, got all the attention. Over time, people began to realize that as impressive as OpenStack was, the CI system behind it, which enabled contributors and users across many different organizations to work and develop quickly together across multiple projects, was impressive in its own right. Read more

Smallest RK3399 hacker board yet ships at $129 with 4GB DDR4

FriendlyElec has launched a 100 x 64mm, $129 “NanoPC-T4” SBC that runs Android or Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 with 4G DDR4, native GbE, WiFi-ac, DP, HDMI 2.0, 0 to 80℃ support, and M.2 and 40-pin expansion. FriendlyElec has released its most powerful and priciest hacker board to date, which it promotes as being the smallest RK3399-based SBC on the market. The 100 x 64mm NanoPC-T4 opens with a $129 discount price with the default 4GB DDR4 and 16GB eMMC. Although that will likely rise in the coming months, it’s still priced in the middle range of open spec RK3399 SBCs. Read more

today's leftovers

  • How to dual-boot Linux and Windows
    Even though Linux is a great operating system with widespread hardware and software support, the reality is that sometimes you have to use Windows, perhaps due to key apps that won't run under Linux. Thankfully, dual-booting Windows and Linux is very straightforward—and I'll show you how to set it up, with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 18.04, in this article. Before you get started, make sure you've backed up your computer. Although the dual-boot setup process is not very involved, accidents can still happen. So take the time to back up your important files in case chaos theory comes into play. In addition to backing up your files, consider taking an image backup of the disk as well, though that's not required and can be a more advanced process.
  • Weather Forecasting Gets A Big Lift In Japan
    This is a lot more compute capacity than JMA has had available to do generic weather forecasting as well as do predictions for typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions – the weather forecasting alone is predicted to run 10X faster, according to Cray.
  • Bitwarden Password Manager Adds Command Line Vault
    Bitwarden, the secure, open source password manager we talked about recently, added a command line tool to its list of apps you can use to access your passwords. Bitwarden CLI is currently in public beta testing, and according to its documentation, it includes all the features available in other Bitwarden client applications, like the desktop or browser extension.
  • GSoC’18 Week 1
    The first week of the coding period was great and I got to learn a lot of new things. My mentors help me on every stage and the work is going on as planne [...] Improvement in the overall UI is still in progress. Other than this, I have been working on refactoring the current code for this activity and breaking the whole code into various elements. For the next week, my main task is to complete the overall UI of this activity and add more geometries for drawing.
  • Time to Test Plasma 5.13 Beta
    The forthcoming new release of Plasma 5.13 will have some lovely new features such as rewritten System Settings pages and Plasma Browser Integration. But we need testers. Incase you missed it the Plasma 5.13 release announce has a rundown of the main features. If you are an auditory learner you can listen to the Late Night Linux Extra podcast where Jonathan “great communicator” Riddell talks about the recent sprint and the release.
  • GSoC students are already hacking!
    We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)
  • CryptoFest a openSUSE Conference již tento víkend v Praze
  • openSUSE Conference a CryptoFest 2018
  • Aaeon reveals two rugged, Linux-ready embedded PCs
    Aaeon unveiled two Linux-friendly embedded systems: an “AIOT-IP6801” gateway equipped with an Apollo Lake-based UP Squared SBC with WiFi and LoRa, and a “Boxer-8120AI” mini-PC with an Nvidia Jetson TX2 module and 4x GbE ports. Aaeon announced that three of its Linux-ready embedded systems have won Computex d&j awards, including two previously unannounced models: an Intel Apollo Lake based AIOT-IP6801 gateway based on Aaeon’s community-backed UP Squared board, as well as a Boxer-8120AI embedded computer built around an Arm-based Jetson TX2 module.
  • Last Call for Purism's Librem 5 Dev Kits, Git Protocol Version 2 Released, LXQt Version 0.13.0 Now Available and More
    Purism announces last call for its Librem 5 dev kits. If you're interested in the hardware that will be the platform for the Librem 5 privacy-focused phones, place your order by June 1, 2018. The dev kit is $399, and it includes "screen, touchscreen, development mainboard, cabling, power supply and various sensors (free worldwide shipping)".