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Sunday, 17 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 7:34pm
Story Scientific Linux 7.0 x86_64 released Rianne Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 7:32pm
Story AMD's New Open-Source "AMDGPU" Linux Driver Supports The R9 285 Tonga Rianne Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 7:29pm
Story Amazon Web Services Aims for More Open Source Involvement Rianne Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 7:17pm
Story Red Hat Picks AppDirect To Run Its Developer Marketplace Rianne Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 7:10pm
Story Zen Web to Join Firefox OS Phone Players in India Rianne Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 7:03pm
Story Wind River Linux taps Yocto 1.7, adds binary option Rianne Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 6:52pm
Story NVIDIA Brings GPU Acceleration Support for PhysX on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 6:46pm
Story KRunner and Plasma 5 Rianne Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 6:41pm
Story FreeBSD 10.1-RC2 Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 13/10/2014 - 6:32pm

Looking Forward to Distro Octoberfest

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: October is going to be an exciting month for Linux enthusiasts. Three big-time distributions namely Debian, Mandriva, and Ubuntu will unleash their latest and hopefully their greatest distro versions.

Five operating systems that time forgot

Filed under
OS

techradar.com: While you're cursing the slow boot times of your modern PC or wondering why you can't have 50 applications open at once without the system taking a hit, cast your mind back to the operating systems of old. Here are five operating systems we fondly remember.

Europe lagging on open source

Filed under
OSS

techworld.com: Open-source software developers are seeing a lot of interest in their products in Europe - but it's North American companies that are opening their cheque books, said speakers at Paris Capitale du Libre, a conference organised by the Federation of Open Source Software Industry.

Linux Where You'd Least Expect It

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: We all know Linux is at home in enterprise servers and, sometimes, on desktops. However, it's not so easy to tell that Linux is at home inside all sorts of consumer electronics.

A dozen cool plasmoids for your KDE desktop

Filed under
KDE

techworld.com.au: A plasmoid is an applet developed with KDE’s new Plasma application development environment. So let’s take a look at what people have been cooking up with Plasma – the results are quite surprising and many are already shipping with the standard KDE 4.1 desktop.

FOSS: time to stop the navel-gazing

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: Discussions about free and open source software can arouse strong emotions. That's something I've known for many years but one often tends to forget these things in the rush of daily life.

GOS 3 on a EEE pc 901

Filed under
Linux

linuxexperimentation.blogspot: I am environment friendly, I am a botanist and probably that's the reason why I love Green. I am a fan of the environmental friendly Asus EEE pc which consumes less power and seemingly helps reduce global warming. It would be a good combination for GOS and EEE to work together in delivering a great computing experience. So I set out to test my hypotheis by installing GOS on my new EEE 901.

How To Stop Firefox Clickjacking Exploit Attack

Filed under
Security

cyberciti.biz: Really scary exploit attack in wild, which affects all browsers under any desktop operating systems including MS IE, Linux, Apple safari, Opera, Firefox and Adobe flash. Any website that uses CSS, flash and IFRAME can be used to attack on end users. Attacker is able to take control of the links that your browser visits.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • 125+ Linux wallpapers

  • Linux triumphs in UK schools as hell freezes over
  • Will GNOME 2.2.4 improve the Linux desktop?
  • Upgrade Your Linux Desktop Experience With GNOME 2.24
  • Mandriva Mini: Linux For Atom -- And For OEMs Only (So Far)
  • More On The Mandriva Mini
  • Open source: The new usability testing
  • Linux criticisms probably won't win Solaris converts
  • 2.6.27 Kernel Killing Network Hardware
  • openSUSE Membership Applications…
  • 3 Ways to Visualize Your Search History With FireFox
  • How To Avoid Becoming a Defendant in a GPL-Related Lawsuit
  • GNOME 3.0 Art / User-Interface Roadmap
  • S01E15 - Five Sleepy Heads - Ubuntu UK Podcast
  • Sidux 2008-03
  • Microsoft: Windows and Linux offer same TCO in emerging markets
  • Verify that a daily cron function is running in gentoo

  • How to run the jack audio connection seamlessly in gnome on Fedora
  • Never Installed a Firewall on Ubuntu? Try Firestarter
  • TuxGuitar - A multitrack guitar tablature editor and player
  • Process monitoring with ps-watcher
  • A Poor Man’s Multi-Monitor Setup On A Single Physical Head

Installing Linux apps: A few good tips

Filed under
HowTos

computerworld.com: Sooner or later, we all end up installing new software on our computers. Whether it's a new version of Firefox, or a cool game, or a video editing package, there comes a time when you want to make your system do more than it can do now.

Define “Contributions”

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

redmonk.com/sogrady: In his opening keynote at the Linux Plumbers Conference in Portland, Greg Kroah-Hartman did so succinctly, if bluntly. His metric? Kernel contributions. Simple. Underneath all the rhetoric and the broadsides lies a real question: is Canonical a member in good standing of the Linux ecosystem?

power management goodness: kde 4.2 will suck less

Filed under
KDE

vizzzion.org: As Dario has already blogged, we have a great new application in kdebase, scheduled to be released with KDE 4.2 in january. PowerDevil is actually not an application in the traditional sense. PowerDevil delivers the infrastructure for power management in KDE.

KDE 4.1.2 tagged, gentoo land frozen

Filed under
KDE
Gentoo

freehackers.org: On July 29th, KDE 4.1, the first almost usable KDE version since the 3.5 branch, has been released, and since then guess what happened in the gentoo-kde land? Nothing. Rumors are that developers have fought each others and the kde team is just no more.

The five best desktop Linuxes you haven't tried

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: One of the pleasures of Linux is that you can try out different distributions to see which one works best for you. You like Ubuntu, but you want to fine tune the desktop engine? OK, try Kubuntu with its KDE desktop then. Some worthwhile distributions, however, don't get as much attention as they deserve. So, here's my list of five great distributions that you might want to try.

Open source could fix e-voting flaws, California secretary of state says

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: California Secretary of State Debra Bowen argued Thursday that open source software can help fix some of the flaws in electronic voting systems, which have proliferated throughout the country since the 2000 election yet been criticized as unreliable.

Ubuntu 8.10 beta freeze now in effect

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: We are now one week from the beta release of 8.10 and have just entered beta freeze.

Q & A with John Lilly, CEO of Mozilla Corp.

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

mercurynews.com: John Lilly became chief executive of Mozilla Corp. in January, moving up from his role as chief operating officer. He's been with the company that created the open-source Firefox browser since 2005, the year Firefox 1.5 was released.

Fedora @5: How a Community Approach Works

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Seeing the Fedora Project pass its five year milestone got me thinking about the early days of the community-based Linux distribution and how far it's come.

Gentoo 2008.1 Release Solutions

Filed under
Gentoo

Daniel Robbins: Gentoo seems to be having problems with .”1” releases – 2007.1 was cancelled and now 2008.1 has been cancelled. The Gentoo project has also announced a desire to move to a more “back to basics approach” where they are doing weekly builds of Gentoo stages. Good idea.

On-line applications "just work"; why worry about the freedom of the licence?

freesoftwaremagazine.com: An increasing number of computer users are turning to online applications instead of ones on their desktop. It started with webmail and has moved to productivity/office tools. With the emergence of online applications that have no desktop equivalent, and mobile devices that are browsers in your pocket, things are looking up. But what about free software?

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More in Tux Machines

FLOSSophobia

I have seen it many times. "Linux is a cancer". "Open sauce". "Linuxtard". I even remember the teacher who did not bring a laptop for her presentation and, when I offered her my Linux netbook, she rejected it as if I had presented her something illegal. She tried to use an old Windows computer instead but, when the computer failed, she ended up displaying her presentation with my Linux netbook. Clearly, this teacher's position was not based on ignorance or lack of expertise because she knew Linux existed and all she had to do was to display slides. Her refusal was due to indoctrination: she had learned that Linux and non-Microsoft office suites had to be rejected. Read more

Today in Techrights

Hands on With elementary OS Powered Centurion Nano Laptop by Alpha Store

If you want to buy a new laptop, no doubt you should consider the Centurion line. It will be a good choice for you, Linux aficionado. As well as for your Windows-addicted husband/wife/employees. The Centurion Nano is certainly not a “gamer” laptop. However, besides that particular use case, and for an interesting price, you will get a very competent computer, 100% compatible with Linux and usable for a broad range of tasks. Read more

Tryton and Python Deprecation Warnings

  • Trying Tryton
    The quest to find a free-software replacement for the QuickBooks accounting tool continues. In this episode, your editor does his best to put Tryton through its paces. Running Tryton proved to be a trying experience, though; this would not appear to be the accounting tool we are searching for. Tryton is a Python 3 application distributed under the GPLv3 license. Its home page mentions that it is based on PostgreSQL, but there is support for MySQL and SQLite as well. Tryton, it is said, is "a three-tier high-level general purpose application platform" that is "the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security". The "core base" part of that claim is relevant: Tryton may well be a solid base for the creation of a small-business accounting system, but it is not, out of the box, such a system itself.
  • Who should see Python deprecation warnings?
    As all Python developers discover sooner or later, Python is a rapidly evolving language whose community occasionally makes changes that can break existing programs. The switch to Python 3 is the most prominent example, but minor releases can include significant changes as well. The CPython interpreter can emit warnings for upcoming incompatible changes, giving developers time to prepare their code, but those warnings are suppressed and invisible by default. Work is afoot to make them visible, but doing so is not as straightforward as it might seem. In early November, one sub-thread of a big discussion on preparing for the Python 3.7 release focused on the await and async identifiers. They will become keywords in 3.7, meaning that any code using those names for any other purpose will break. Nick Coghlan observed that Python 3.6 does not warn about the use of those names, calling it "a fairly major oversight/bug". In truth, though, Python 3.6 does emit warnings in that case — but users rarely see them.