Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Big, Bad Browser Quiz srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:37pm
Story Canonical Again Pushes Desktop Ubuntu for the Enterprise srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:34pm
Story Intel pulls MeeGo plug? srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:32pm
Story We won and we didn't notice srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:30pm
Story New features in ubuntu 11.10 srlinuxx 3 02/09/2011 - 5:54pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 7:11am
Story Why is the packaging process so broken?!? srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:39am
Story Kernel.org breach does not reflect well on admins srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:36am
Story SUSE Loses Another Former RadeonHD Developer srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:35am
Story First Plasma Active experience srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:34am

The Open Source Security Motherload: 105 Tools, Applications and Resources

Filed under
Software

Open source security is like a military general who shows his plans to both his allies and his enemies. On the one hand, his enemies can try to exploit the plan by targeting its weaknesses. But on the other hand, by exposing his tactics to those who want to help, the plan is ultimately much stronger as a result of their feedback and modifications.

Red Hat Linux Not Likely To Be Offered On Dell Desktop PCs

Filed under
Linux

In a brief research note this morning, Pacific Crest’s Brendan Barnicle writes that it “seems unlikely” that Dell will offer Red Hat’s (RHT) version of Linux on its desktop PCs. Barnicle writes that his contacts believe the company is more likely to choose a version of Linux from Ubuntu or possibly Novell (NOVL).

Linux Foundation pushes OS to common ground

Filed under
Interviews

In January, two open-source advocacy groups -- the Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and the Free Standards Group (FSG) -- merged and formed the Linux Foundation. Last month, the new nonprofit organization named its board of directors, which includes representatives from Linux vendors and users, as well as Linux kernel developers and other open-source community members.

Goodbye etch, hello lenny

Filed under
Linux

The long-anticipated Debian 4.0 may only just have made its debut this week, but it's never too soon for the developer community to be making plans for its successor.

Ubuntu's new Linux sports debugging tool

Filed under
Ubuntu

With its upcoming "Feisty Fawn" version of Ubuntu Linux due April 19, Canonical hopes to shed light on what happens when things go wrong.

Ubuntu's new Linux sports debugging tool With its upcoming "Feisty Fawn" version of Ubuntu Linux due April 19, Canonical hopes to shed light on what happens when things go wrong.

Timed shutdown in openSUSE: kshutdown

Filed under
HowTos

I never thought I’d need it, but today I did. I needed a timer (for shutdown) in linux.

context: I was doing some bittorrent downloads during an ISP limited timeframe. I had to finish by 8:00am otherwise it would cost me dearly!

tried and failed: I googled for “timed shutdown” and found two main solutions… THAT DIDN’T WORK in openSUSE.

So what worked?

Ubuntu 7.04 - 108 new updates, Gnome 2.18.1 upgrade, network regression

Filed under
Ubuntu

Got a big block of upgrades today, including Gnome. Gnome itself was upgraded to 2.18.1 and Ubuntu followed right along. Quick testing indicates that Compiz is still regressed from the last upgrade, which is no big deal to me. Regular old 'flat' mode still works just fine, and I can live with that.

No, there's a bigger problem. When the system reboots networking does not automatically start.

Are GPLv3 and Apache 2 incompatible?

Filed under
OSS

One of the GPLv3's (GNU General Public License version 3) goals was be more compatible with other open-source licenses. There is some concern, however, that this goal has not been achieved in relation to the Apache License 2.

Quick Little Tour of Opera's New Speed Dial

Filed under
Software
-s

Opera 9.2 was released this morning to a surprizing amount of interest. I suppose one of the reasons for all this excitement is the new feature called Speed Dial.

Dispelling the fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD) about Linux

Filed under
Linux

The fear, uncertainty and doubt surrounding Linux is still immense and it's purely through lack of education. If only people could see what's happening in the community they might change their tune. Here's why the FUD is misplaced.

Squid in 5 minutes

Filed under
HowTos

Why Squid? Why only five minutes?

There are many great tools that Squid has to offer, but when I need to redirect http traffic to a caching server for performance increases or security, squid’s my pick. Squid has built in proxy and caching tools that are simple, yet effective.

Open Source, Stat!

Filed under
OSS

There is a syndrome that has lately been plaguing the "Big 4" proprietary vendors.

I will call it the "Acquisition/Confusion Syndrome." It can be severely damaging, and anyone exposed to it is susceptible to infection.

The point of exposure occurs when a "Big 4" vendor acquires a smaller, focused start-up in the hopes of expanding their offerings to their customers.

Web Browser Shows Glance of 9 Favorites

Filed under
Software

The latest version of Opera's Web browser lets visitors see mini versions of their nine favorite sites at a glance. Click on any thumbnail to load the full site.

The Speed Dial feature also lets people access the site by typing its corresponding numeral -- 1 to 9 -- in the address bar.

"Speed Dial is a fresh way to call up the top sites you enjoy throughout the day."

Ubuntu Linux Forges Tighter DB2 Ties

Filed under
Ubuntu

IBM's DB2 has long been a Linux-friendly, cross-platform database. But as of this week, there will be improved coexistence between DB2 and the latest Ubuntu 6.06 Linux release.

The latest IBM database will now download and deploy easily from the Ubuntu desktop. If users want DB2, they can go to the download site, and Ubuntu automates the download and installs it.

Open-Source Security Tools Abound

Filed under
OSS

Open-source security tools abound, so take advantage of them and avoid paying for commercial products if open source fits your needs. That was the message from Matthew Luallen, president of consulting firm Sph3r3, who spoke at the recent InfoSec Conference.

The Road to KDE 4: Strigi and File Information Extraction

Filed under
KDE

After a short delay due to a heavy dosage of Real Life(tm), I return to bring you more on the technologies behind KDE 4. This week I am featuring Strigi, an information extraction subsystem that is being fully deployed for KDE 4.0.

Ubuntu Linux: To the server side and beyond?

Filed under
Ubuntu

As the launch of Ubuntu "Feisty Fawn" 7.04 draws near, proponents of the Linux operating system (OS) are predicting much wider adoption of it in server environments.

Bolstering that belief is Canonical Ltd.'s -- Ubuntu's corporate sponsor -- promise that the OS's existing server functionality would be better marketed in 2007.

LinuxWorld San Francisco 2007

Filed under
Linux

IDG World Expo, the leading producer of world-class tradeshows and events has announced that attendee registration for LinuxWorld Conference & Expo 2007 is now open.

KDE Promo IRC meeting - April 15 at 1700 GMT

Filed under
KDE

If you’re already involved in the KDE promotional community, would like to get involved, or you’re just plain nosey: we welcome you to join us at 1700 GMT April 15th on IRC #kde-promo on irc.freenode.net. Of course, you’ll also want to pay attention to details on our mailing list.

This meeting will be the first in a series; we’ll be meeting every second Sunday on IRC going forward.

Updating Ubuntu’s Edgy Eft to Feisty Fawn with Automatix2

Filed under
HowTos

Here’s the scenario. You’ve got a 6.10 box with Automatix2 installed, which you’ve used to install a number of third party additions to your nice, shiney Ubuntu box. Now you want to upgrade from 6.10 to 7.04 but you’re a bit gun shy as you recall what it was like to update to 6.10.

So what’s it going to be like this time? Let’s find out!

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.