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Tuesday, 19 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Proxmox VE 1.2: First Impressions

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: Proxmox VE (VE) offers both OpenVZ containers and full virtualization via KVM in the same system. This flexibility provides you with the native speed of OpenVZ virtual machines and the traditional convenience of fully virtualized operating systems.

Linux Netbooks: Hit Microsoft where it ain't

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Linux

news.cnet.com: In open source or in product development generally, one of the biggest mistakes is to take on a deeply entrenched incumbent on its own turf. Almost inevitably, if you play someone else's game, even if you're a little cheaper/faster/better, you're going to lose.

Working to Rule

Filed under
OSS

tuxdeluxe.org: Office 2007 SP2 contains Microsoft's first native implementation of the file format Open Document Format (ODF). The devil, as always, is in the details.

wicd - A friendly network manager for Linux

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Software

dedoimedo.com: Linux distros have a broad range of managers. In KDE, the default utility is called KNetworkManager. In Gnome, it is - aptly called - Gnome Network Manager. Some Linux users do not like either of these two. Enter wicd.

Linux and the channel

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Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: Linux Pundit Bill Weinberg has produced two posts this weekend asking why we don’t have Linux laptops.

Fedora 12 Team Taking Codename Suggestions

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Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Contributing members of the Fedora community are putting their heads together again to come up with a codename for Fedora 12, and if you've got a good suggestion you've only got until May 23rd to shout it out.

Will European rules impact open source business models?

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OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: If open source wants to get around European procurement rules and tap the government market there can’t be differences between commercial and community versions of their products.

Ubuntu One Service Stirs Up Open-Source Controversy

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcworld.com: Unfortunately there's a stinky little issue, and it's related to a blog posting I made last week: Trademarks. Although it seems the Ubuntu One client is open source, the Web server side of things are still secret.

We should coin a name for non-geeks

terminally-incoherent: I’ve been thinking that we should come up with a name that would collectively describe non-geeks.

Create your own "Ubuntu" LiveCD with Reconstructor

blogs.techrepublic.com: But for creating a unique Ubuntu LiveCD that will allow you to customize what goes on the CD as well as the default username, theme, splash screens, wallpaper, etc. You need Reconstructor.

Microsoft, Linux Foundation issue joint letter opposing proposed software-licensing principles

blogs.zdnet.com: Truth can, indeed, be stranger than fiction — as is evidenced by a May 14 letter on software-licensing policies that was signed by both Microsoft and Linux Foundation officials.

Linux Unified Kernel Claims to Allow You To Run Windows Applications Just Like Running a Linux Program

Linux Unified Kernel claims to allow you to run Windows application native under Linux (I haven't tested it yet though). The installation is quite simple from what I saw, simply download the version called "Linux Unified Kernel 0.2.3 with wine and linux kernel" and then all you have to do is run this (make it executable and double click it):

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 303

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Tips and tricks: Running Slackware "Current"

  • News: Tentative features for Fedora 12, Ubuntu One controversy, Debian "Lenny" with KDE 4, PC-BSD with Xfce and GNOME
  • Released last week: Zenwalk Live 6.0, Foresight Linux 2.1.1
  • Upcoming releases: Sabayon Linux 2009 roadmap
  • New additions: Toutou Linux
  • New distributions: OWASP Live CD, Xange
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Getting Started with Inkscape

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Software

beginlinux.wordpress: Inkscape is a program that behaves like and offers many of the same features as Illustrator, CorelDraw, or Xara X. An open Source vector graphics editor, Inkscape uses the W3C standard Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) file format.

Linux, FOSS and the Cellular Empire

raiden.net: One of the things that I've seen increasingly of late is a regular complaint by users of cellular services that data plans are far too expensive, and too limiting.

Ubuntu: Muslim Edition (Sabily) Review

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Ubuntu

extremetech.com: A while back I looked at the Christian Edition of Ubuntu. This time around I was pleased to find that there was a Muslim edition available. So I gave it a download and thought I'd add it to our collection of Linux distribution reviews.

OpenOffice.org 3.1: Better Performance

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OOo

eweekeurope.co.uk: The 3.0 release of OpenOffice left some issues in the productivity suite. This new version makes a good job of fixing them

Ubuntu Experience–How it Feels

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Experience–How it Feels

  • Ubuntu 64-bit More Competitive Against Mac OS X
  • Canonical's Landscape: Manage Your Clouds, Even on Amazon EC2
  • OWASP LiveCD switching to Ubuntu

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Why you shouldn't care about Linux on the desktop

  • What’s Playing, Doc?
  • Configure Linux printing via web browser
  • UK Government Open Source Action Plan
  • Why the free software community cares about The Pirate Bay
  • Fedora 11 Screenshot Tour
  • Indemnification, support woes plague open source systems management
  • Would Bill Gates have aired Laptop Hunters?
  • Linux Outlaws 92 - New User Special
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More in Tux Machines

Open Source Skills Soar In Demand According to 2018 Jobs Report

Linux expertise is again in the top spot as the most sought after open source skill, says the latest Open Source Jobs Reportfrom Dice and The Linux Foundation. The seventh annual report shows rapidly growing demand for open source skills, particularly in areas of cloud technology. Read more

Graphics: Wayland, RadeonSI, NVIDIA and More

  • Session suspension and restoration protocol
  • A Session Suspension & Restoration Protocol Proposed For Wayland
    KDE Wayland developer Roman Gilg who started contributing to Wayland via last year's Google Summer of Code is proposing a new Wayland protocol for dealing with desktop session suspension and restoration. This protocol extension would allow for more efficient support for client session suspension and restoration such as when you are logging out of your desktop session and want the windows restored at next log-in or if you are suspending your system. While Roman Gilg is working on this protocol with his KDE hat on, he has been talking with Sway and GNOME developers too for ensuring this protocol could work out for their needs.
  • RadeonSI Lands OpenGL 3.3 Compatibility Profile Support
    Thanks to work done over the past few months by AMD's Marek Olšák on improving Mesa's OpenGL compatibility profile support and then today carried over the final mile by Valve's Timothy Arceri, Mesa 18.2 now exposes OpenGL 3.3 under the compatibility context. Hitting Git tonight is the enabling of the OpenGL 3.3 compatibility profile for RadeonSI.
  • NVIDIA Releases DALI Library & nvJPEG GPU-Accelerated Library For JPEG Decode
    For coinciding with the start of the Computer Vision and Patern Recognition conference starting this week in Utah, NVIDIA has a slew of new software announcements. First up NVIDIA has announced the open-source DALI library for GPU-accelerated data augmentation and image loading that is optimized for data pipelines of deep learning frameworks like ResNET-50, TensorFlow, and PyTorch.
  • NVIDIA & Valve Line Up Among The Sponsors For X.Org's XDC 2018
    - The initial list of sponsors have been announced for the annual X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2018) where Wayland, Mesa, and the X.Org Server tend to dominate the discussions for improving the open-source/Linux desktop. This year's XDC conference is being hosted in A Coruña, Spain and taking place in September. The call for presentations is currently open for X.Org/mesa developers wishing to participate.
  • Intel Broxton To Support GVT-g With Linux 4.19
    Intel developers working on the GVT-g graphics virtualization technology have published their latest batch of Linux kernel driver changes.

Fedora and Red Hat: Fedora Atomic, Fedora 29, *GPL and Openwashing ('Open Organization')

  • Fedora Atomic Workstation To Be Renamed Fedora Silverblue
    - Back in early May was the announcement of the Silverblue project as an evolution of Fedora Atomic Workstation and trying to get this atomic OS into shape by Fedora 30. Beginning with Fedora 29, the plan is to officially rename Fedora Atomic Workstation to Fedora Silverblue. Silverblue isn't just a placeholder name, but they are moving ahead with the re-branding initiative around it. The latest Fedora 29 change proposal is to officially change the name of "Fedora Atomic Workstation" to "Fedora Silverblue".
  • Fedora 29 Will Cater i686 Package Builds For x86_64, Hide GRUB On Boot
    The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) approved on Friday more of the proposed features for this fall's release of Fedora 29, including two of the more controversial proposals.
  • Total War: WARHAMMER II Coming to Linux, Red Hat Announces GPL Cooperation Commitment, Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released and More
    Starting today, Red Hat announced that "all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3". The announcement notes that this development is the latest in "an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses".
  • Red Hat Launches Process Automation Manager 7, Brackets Editor Releases Version 1.13, Qt Announces New Patch Release and More
    Red Hat today launched Red Hat Process Automation Manager 7, which is "a comprehensive, cloud-native platform for developing business automation services and process-centric applications across hybrid cloud environments". This new release expands some key capabilities including cloud native application development, dynamic case management and low-code user experience. You can learn more and get started here.
  • A summer reading list for open organization enthusiasts
    The books on this year's open organization reading list crystallize so much of what makes "open" work: Honesty, authenticity, trust, and the courage to question those status quo arrangements that prevent us from achieving our potential by working powerfully together.

Server Domination by GNU/Linux

  • Security and Performance Help Mainframes Stand the Test of Time
    As of last year, the Linux operating system was running 90 percent of public cloud workloads; has 62 percent of the embedded market share and runs all of the supercomputers in the TOP500 list, according to The Linux Foundation Open Mainframe Project’s 2018 State of the Open Mainframe Survey report. Despite a perceived bias that mainframes are behemoths that are costly to run and unreliable, the findings also revealed that more than nine in 10 respondents have an overall positive attitude about mainframe computing. The project conducted the survey to better understand use of mainframes in general. “If you have this amazing technology, with literally the fastest commercial CPUs on the planet, what are some of the barriers?” said John Mertic, director of program management for the foundation and Open Mainframe Project. “The driver was, there wasn’t any hard data around trends on the mainframe.”
  • HPE announces world's largest ARM-based supercomputer
    The race to exascale speed is getting a little more interesting with the introduction of HPE's Astra -- what will be the world's largest ARM-based supercomputer. HPE is building Astra for Sandia National Laboratories and the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA will use the supercomputer to run advanced modeling and simulation workloads for things like national security, energy, science and health care.