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Sunday, 23 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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PCLinuxOS Day 7 - Control Center Part 2

Filed under
PCLOS

ruminations: Two tasks remained under the heading Sharing: settting up file/printserver and setting up a share. The first task ran into a snag quickly with an error message that the name ‘localhost’ wasn’t correct for a DNS server. Setting up a Samba share wasn’t error free as well.

Lenovo finally delivers SUSE Linux-based ThinkPads

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SUSE

desktoplinux: PC vendor Lenovo has promised ThinkPads with pre-installed Novell SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 for some time now. Lenovo will deliver the goods the week of Jan. 14.

Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring Alpha 2 Neottia released

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MDV

The second pre-release of Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring is here. This pre-release brings a near-final snapshot of KDE 4.0 (final 4.0 packages are currently being uploaded to the Cooker repositories), new NVIDIA and ATI drivers, the chance to test the experimental nouveau open source driver for NVIDIA cards, kernel 2.6.24rc7, and more.

Daniel Robbins Offers to Return to Gentoo, Renew Charter

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Gentoo

Daniel Robbins: Several days ago, the Gentoo community discovered the unfortunate news that the Gentoo Foundation's charter has been revoked for several weeks. I have received permission from my employer to return and serve as President of the Gentoo Foundation, renew its charter, and then work in some capacity to help to get Gentoo going in the right direction from a legal, community and technical perspective.

Review: TinyFlux 1.0

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Linux

raiden's realm: TinyFlux (aka PcFluxboxOS) is a remastering of PcLinuxOS done in much the same way as TinyMe, but with Fluxbox as the window manager instead of KDE. It's the new kid on the block in an ever increasingly crowded world of Linux distributions.

Making the case for JeOS

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Linux

blogs.techtarget.com: I recently tried out a test system with an Ubuntu Server 7.10 JeOS build. The JeOS (Just Enough Operating System, pronounced “juice" ) concept for Linux works well if one needs just enough to run a test system.

The Linux Desktop Paradox

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: Nearly every year for the last decade I've heard some pundit or vendor proclaim from the rooftops: This is the year of the Linux desktop. Yet, year in and year out, the proclamations don't materialize.

Find the items you want with GNOME Do

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Blacktree software's free Quicksilver Mac OS X utility won over users by letting them start typing the name of the file or app they need, and popping up the best matches in a launcher. Quicksilver went open source recently, but you don't have to wait for a port to start using it on your Linux machines. Two clones already exist: Katapult for KDE and the newest competitor, GNOME Do.

KDE Control Centre

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KDE

Linux Journal: Setting your desktop's wallpaper is only the beginning. The KDE team has cleverly used a Konqueror-style window for the Control Centre with a navigation panel on the left-hand side, giving you access to the various modules.

some more kde 4

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE 4 is available: First impressions

  • KDE 4 Brings Improvements Galore to the Linux Desktop
  • KDE 4.0 - The Official Release
  • KDE 4.0 released: rough, but ready for action

People of openSUSE: James Tremblay

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Interviews
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: openSUSE Education founder James Tremblay was caught up by ‘People of openSUSE’ to an interesting interview.

Here come the open source IPOs

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OSS

Matthew Aslett: Fortune magazine has published a list of its hot IPO tips for 2008. Three out of the five - MySQL, Ingres and SugarCRM - are open source companies, while another - Parallels - is an open source project sponsor. Here’s a look.

More KDE 4 Stuff

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KDE
  • KDE 4: A New Dawn for the Linux Desktop?

  • KDE 4.0 Screenshots Tour
  • Howto Install KDE 4.0 in Ubuntu Gutsy
  • Goodbye Vista, KDE 4.0 Has Arrived!
  • KDE 4.0 is out - a look back
  • cashews for x.org

KDE 4.0 Released

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KDE

The KDE Community is thrilled to announce the immediate availability of KDE 4.0. This significant release marks both the end of the long and intensive development cycle leading up to KDE 4.0 and the beginning of the KDE 4 era.

Ubuntu Readers get an "A", Cnet blogger an "F"

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Ubuntu

c|net blog: The first thing you learn when you write about technology is that the people who read your stuff are smarter than you'll ever be. So let me start by saying "Thank you" to all the Linux users who responded to last Friday's post on my travails trying to get Ubuntu 7.10, or "Gutsy Gibbon," to recognize my Linksys WPC300N wireless adapter.

MIB Live Games

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Gaming

fareast.linuxdiary: MIB Live Games is a treasure trove for Linux gamers; at last count over 100 games, 48 in arcade alone. As it is based on Mandriva 2008 and to say that everything is included out of the box on this remaster of Mandriva 2008 ‘One’ would be an understatement indeed.

Upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit Fedora Linux without a system reinstall

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Linux

linux.com: Cross-grading to the 64-bit variant of your Linux distribution can help you use your resources more wisely. ver the years, I've talked to Fedora enthusiasts and Red Hat employees at Linux conferences about doing a cross-grade to 64-bit. I generally heard one solution: reinstall. However, I wanted to see if a cross-grade was feasible at a whole distribution level.

How Do You Install Linux Applications?

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Software

eWeek blogs: If you are a command line guru, you call upon your zypper, yum, conary, or apt-get from the terminal, and you awk sed grep your way to what you're after. For me, unless I know exactly what package I want--and I often don't--I typically turn to Synaptic.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Sexy PlexyDesk on the way

  • Killer lasers menace Linux Thinkpads
  • KDE 4.0 in Debian and Ubuntu
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 6th January 2008
  • Snoop / View Other Linux Shell User Typescript of Terminal Session
  • Konsole as a Full Screen Terminal
  • Ubuntu Remote Desktop Sharing
  • OLPC hacked to run Amiga OS
  • Financial group trusts Linux platform to protect customers' assets
  • OOXML Questions Microsoft Cannot Answer in Geneva
  • NVIDIA Plotting Open-Source Strategy?

Can open source cut campaign costs?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Having followed computing and politics since 1996 I have long been fascinated with whether scaled Internet-based computing can, in fact, cut the cost of campaigning. This year represents the best test yet of that proposition.

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today's howtos

Security Leftovers

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

  • Debian Developers Make Progress With RISC-V Port
    Debian developers continue making progress with a -- currently unofficial -- port of their Linux operating system to RISC-V. There is a in-progress Debian GNU/Linux port to RISC-V along with a repository with packages built for RISC-V. RISC-V for the uninitiated is a promising, open-source ISA for CPUs. So far there isn't any widely-available RISC-V hardware, but there are embedded systems in the works while software emulators are available.
  • 2×08: Pique Oil
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 KDE
  • deepin 15.4 Released, With Download Link & Mirrors
    deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux operating system has been released at April 19th 2017. I list here one official download link and two faster mirrors from Sourceforge. I listed here the Mega and Google mirrors as well but remember they don't provide direct download. The 15.4 provided only as 64 bit, the 32 bit version has already dropped (except by commercial support). I hope this short list helps you.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Overlayfs snapshots
    At the 2017 Vault storage conference, Amir Goldstein gave a talk about using overlayfs in a novel way to create snapshots for the underlying filesystem. His company, CTERA Networks, has used the NEXT3 ext3-based filesystem with snapshots, but customers want to be able to use larger filesystems than those supported by ext3. Thus he turned to overlayfs as a way to add snapshots for XFS and other local filesystems. NEXT3 has a number of shortcomings that he wanted to address with overlayfs snapshots. Though it only had a few requirements, which were reasonably well supported, NEXT3 never got upstream. It was ported to ext4, but his employer stuck with the original ext3-based system, so the ext4 version was never really pushed for upstream inclusion.
  • Five days and counting
    It is five days left until foss-north 2017, so it is high time to get your ticket! Please notice that tickets can be bought all the way until the night of the 25th (Tuesday), but catering is only included is you get your ticket on the 24th (Monday), so help a poor organizer and get your tickets as soon as possible!
  • OpenStack Radium? Maybe…but it could be Formidable
    OK the first results are in from the OpenStack community naming process for the R release. The winner at this point is Radium.
  • Libreboot Wants Back Into GNU
    Early this morning, Libreboot’s lead developer Leah Rowe posted a notice to the project’s website and a much longer post to the project’s subreddit, indicating that she would like to submit (or resubmit, it’s not clear how that would work at this point) the project to “rejoin the GNU Project.” The project had been a part of GNU from May 14 through September 15 of last year, at which time Ms. Rowe very publicly removed the project from GNU while making allegations of misdeeds by both GNU and the Free Software Foundation. Earlier this month, Rowe admitted that she had been dealing with personal issues at the time and had overreacted. The project also indicated that it had reorganized and that Rowe was no longer in full control.
  • Understanding the complexity of copyleft defense

    The fundamental mechanism defending software freedom is copyleft, embodied in GPL. GPL, however, functions only through upholding it--via GPL enforcement. For some, enforcement has been a regular activity for 30 years, but most projects don't enforce: they live with regular violations. Today, even under the Community Principles of GPL Enforcement, GPL enforcement is regularly criticized and questioned. The complex landscape is now impenetrable for developers who wish their code to remain forever free. This talk provides basic history and background information on the topic.

  • After Bill Gates Backs Open Access, Steve Ballmer Discovers The Joys Of Open Data
    A few months ago, we noted that the Gates Foundation has emerged as one of the leaders in requiring the research that it funds to be released as open access and open data -- an interesting application of the money that Bill Gates made from closed-source software. Now it seems that his successor as Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer, has had a similar epiphany about openness. Back in 2001, Ballmer famously called GNU/Linux "a cancer". Although he later softened his views on software somewhat, that was largely because he optimistically claimed that the threat to Microsoft from free software was "in the rearview mirror". Not really: today, the Linux-based Android has almost two orders of magnitude more market share than Windows Phone.
  • New Open Door Policy for GitHub Developer Program
    GitHub has opened the doors on its three year old GitHub Developer Program. As of Monday, developers no longer need to have paid accounts to participate. "We're opening the program up to all developers, even those who don't have paid GitHub accounts," the company announced in a blog post. "That means you can join the program no matter which stage of development you're in,"
  • MuleSoft Joins the OpenAPI Initiative: The End of the API Spec Wars
    Yesterday, MuleSoft, the creators of RAML, announced that they have joined the Open API Initiative. Created by SmartBear Software and based on the wildly popular Swagger Specification, the OpenAPI Initiative is a Linux Foundation project with over 20 members, including Adobe, IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Salesforce.