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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 21/06/2011 - 6:12am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 21/06/2011 - 6:03am
Story Mozilla, where is Firefox OS? srlinuxx 21/06/2011 - 5:56am
Story Is Ubuntu on the way out? srlinuxx 21/06/2011 - 5:54am
Story PlanetLab creates a more advanced sudo srlinuxx 1 21/06/2011 - 3:11am
Story Some thoughts on commercial FOSS game development srlinuxx 21/06/2011 - 2:24am
Story Updating to rawhide is harder than I thought. srlinuxx 21/06/2011 - 2:22am
Story Netbook charges via built-in solar panel srlinuxx 21/06/2011 - 2:20am
Story A totally unscientific look at the historical trends regarding forks srlinuxx 20/06/2011 - 10:31pm
Story PlayOnLinux - There are no miracles srlinuxx 20/06/2011 - 10:29pm

The best free edutainment software for your kids

Filed under
Software

Gcompris is a collection of educational games that provides many edutainment activities for your children aged beyond 2. It has nearly 100 activities as of now, and many more are being added. Moreover, the best part of Gcompris is it is available in 18 International languages! Gcompris is meant for Kids, but in fact, some games are so lovely and well thought, even I love to play them!

New KDE 4 preview shows progress

Filed under
KDE

On Friday, the KDE Project released the third in a series of development previews for the upcoming KDE 4.0 release. Dubbed "Kludge," the 3.80.3 release includes the Sonnet language library, the new Dolphin file manager, and the Solid hardware library.

New GPL 3 Draft Imminent, Yet Final Release Delayed

Filed under
OSS

A new draft of the upcoming GNU General Public License Version 3 (GPL 3) will be released shortly, participants in the drafting process say, but a final release is likely to slip past the March 2007 deadline that the GPL's maintainer, the Free Software Foundation (FSF), initially set as the "latest possible release date."

What Happened to The Open Management Group?

Filed under
OSS

Whatever happened to the Open Management Consortium (OMC)? Since last May when six open source management projects announced the formation of the OMC, the group has issued nary a peep of news. Is there an agenda?

Patents cut both ways for Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Here is Steve Balmer focusing on Linux, making the tired claim that there is so-called Intellectual Property in Linux that violates patents held by Microsoft. Meanwhile Microsoft gets hit with a hefty patent violation of its own; 1.5 billion (yes, that is a “B”) for the use of the mp3 patent without payment of royalties. It appears that patent obligations are for others, not for Microsoft to worry about.

Note to new Linux users: No antivirus needed

Filed under
Linux

One of the most common questions I hear new Linux users ask is "What program should I use for virus protection?" Many of them lose faith in me as a source of security information when I reply, "None." But you really don't need to fear malware on your new platform, thanks to the way Linux is built.

Nat: "Is 'open source' now completely meaningless?"

Filed under
OSS

Nat Torkington is trying to come up with the agenda for OSCON, and has discovered that the minute one steps out of the world of community open source to scan the ranks of commercial open source, you find lots of commercials, but little source.

KVM steals virtualization spotlight

Filed under
Software

Four months ago, almost nobody had heard of an open-source virtualization software called KVM. But that was then. The project, backed by a stealth-mode start-up called Qumranet, uses a technical and cultural approach that has quickly drawn powerful allies--including Red Hat and Linux founder Linus Torvalds.

Creative Commons - Version 3.0 Launched

Filed under
OSS

The latest version of the Creative Commons licenses — Version 3.0 — are now available. To briefly recap what is different in this version of the licenses:

Clipmarks - double-edged FireFox extension

Filed under
Moz/FF

Looking for a useful note taking tool I tried out the Clipmarks extension for Firefox. Clipmarks allows one to select clips of text and pictures from websites and store them on the Clipmarks website. These clips can either be kept private or shared with the public.

What You Need to Know About Linux Rootkits.

Filed under
HowTos

A rootkit is a group of software tools which an attacker can use to hide their tracks. A rootkit can also contain software which allows the attacker to get root access and steal or remove files on a system. Another goal for a rootkit is for the attacker to maintain access to the hijacked computer. Rootkits are written for many different operating systems however, this article will only talk about Linux rootkits.

Linux Commercialization Transforms Community

Filed under
Linux

Last week I interviewed, by invitation, with one of the two major Linux commercial vendors in the US. I would characterize the interview as one of the most humiliating experiences I can remember. I soon discovered the company had no plans to conduct a normal interview.

Fedora 7 Test 2

Fedora 7 Test 2 is being pushed out the door this Tuesday (February 27), but thanks to the excellence of Pungi we decided to run our own spin. New in Fedora 7 Test 2 is the artwork along with quite a few other changes that we commented on in our Fedora 7 Preview earlier this year. In this article we have some of the first screenshots from Fedora 7 Test 2.

PyCon Days 2 & 3

Filed under
Software

Yesterday brought PyCon 2007 to a close. Well, sort of. There are sprints going on for the next few days, but the formal sessions are over. This was a great experience for me and I’m already looking forward to next year. I’ll try to put my thougts together for a “PyCon 2007 as a whole” blog post later.

National Open Source Centre launches today in the Houses of Parliament

Filed under
OSS

The National Open Centre (NOC) is launched today by John Hemming MP, in the Houses of Parliament. The NOC will help the UK to benefit from open source and open standards by developing strategic analysis and policy, clarifying opportunities and fostering innovation.

Also: Standards make open source political

Hey Linux Fans: Certification Isn't Pre-Installation

Filed under
Linux

Dell says, ". . . we have seen a consistent request to provide platforms that allow people to install their operating system of choice." (Emphasis added.)

Also: Can Dell change the Linux market?
And: Dell takes small steps toward Linux

Our beliefs cloud our judjment.

Filed under
OS

Everybody has their "favourite" operating system. That's fine, in fact that's good. Everybody should have an operating system to champion. What is not good is when we allow our beliefs to blind us to the real facts of our chosen package of ones and zeros.

Open Source is my programming

Filed under
Humor

Open Source is my programming; I shall not hide.
He maketh me to lie down in fast hard drives: he leadeth me beside the CPU bus.
He restoreth my source code...

Critical JavaScript flaw hits Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla has confirmed a potentially serious flaw in its open source Firefox browser. The disclosure comes on the same day that Mozilla released an update for Firefox, which does not address the JavaScript flaw.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • OpenVZ 7.0 Becomes A Complete Linux Distribution, Based On VzLinux
    OpenVZ, a long-standing Linux virtualization technology and similar to LXC and Solaris Containers, is out with their major 7.0 release. OpenVZ 7.0 has focused on merging the OpenVZ and Virtuozzo code-bases along with replacing their own hypervisor with that of Linux's KVM. Under OpenVZ 7.0, it has become a complete Linux distribution based upon VzLinux.
  • OpenVZ 7.0 released
    I’m pleased to announce the release of OpenVZ 7.0. The new release focuses on merging OpenVZ and Virtuozzo source codebase, replacing our own hypervisor with KVM.
  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.4.0 beta 2
    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.
  • FreeIPA Lightweight CA internals
    In the preceding post, I explained the use cases for the FreeIPA lightweight sub-CAs feature, how to manage CAs and use them to issue certificates, and current limitations. In this post I detail some of the internals of how the feature works, including how signing keys are distributed to replicas, and how sub-CA certificate renewal works. I conclude with a brief retrospective on delivering the feature.
  • Lightweight Sub-CAs in FreeIPA 4.4
    Last year FreeIPA 4.2 brought us some great new certificate management features, including custom certificate profiles and user certificates. The upcoming FreeIPA 4.4 release builds upon this groundwork and introduces lightweight sub-CAs, a feature that lets admins to mint new CAs under the main FreeIPA CA and allows certificates for different purposes to be issued in different certificate domains. In this post I will review the use cases and demonstrate the process of creating, managing and issuing certificates from sub-CAs. (A follow-up post will detail some of the mechanisms that operate behind the scenes to make the feature work.)
  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.200.2.0
    The second Armadillo release of the 7.* series came out a few weeks ago: version 7.200.2. And RcppArmadillo version 0.7.200.2.0 is now on CRAN and uploaded to Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now over 240 packages using it. For once, I let it simmer a little preparing only a package update via the GitHub repo without preparing a CRAN upload to lower the update frequency a little. Seeing that Conrad has started to release 7.300.0 tarballs, the time for a (final) 7.200.2 upload was now right. Just like the previous, it now requires a recent enough compiler. As g++ is so common, we explicitly test for version 4.6 or newer. So if you happen to be on an older RHEL or CentOS release, you may need to get yourself a more modern compiler. R on Windows is now at 4.9.3 which is decent (yet stable) choice; the 4.8 series of g++ will also do. For reference, the current LTS of Ubuntu is at 5.4.0, and we have g++ 6.1 available in Debian testing.

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: Debian

  • Debian LGBTIQA+
    I have a long overdue blog entry about what happened in recent times. People that follow my tweets did catch some things. Most noteworthy there was the Trans*Inter*Congress in Munich at the start of May. It was an absolute blast. I met so many nice and great people, talked and experienced so many great things there that I'm still having a great motivational push from it every time I think back. It was also the time when I realized that I in fact do have body dysphoria even though I thought I'm fine with my body in general: Being tall is a huge issue for me. Realizing that I have a huge issue (yes, pun intended) with my length was quite relieving, even though it doesn't make it go away. It's something that makes passing and transitioning for me harder. I'm well aware that there are tall women, and that there are dedicated shops for lengthy women, but that's not the only thing that I have trouble with. What bothers me most is what people read into tall people: that they are always someone they can lean on for comfort, that tall people are always considered to be self confident and standing up for themselves (another pun, I know ... my bad).
  • [GSOC] Week 8&9 Report
    This particular week has been tiresome as I did catch a cold ;). I did come back from Cape Town where debconf taking place. My arrival at Montreal was in the middle of the week, so this week is not plenty of news…
  • Debian on Jetson TK1
    I became interested in running Debian on NVIDIA's Tegra platform recently. NVIDIA is doing a great job getting support for Tegra upstream (u-boot, kernel, X.org and other projects). As part of ensuring good Debian support for Tegra, I wanted to install Debian on a Jetson TK1, a development board from NVIDIA based on the Tegra K1 chip (Tegra 124), a 32-bit ARM chip.
  • RC bugs 2016/01-29

Android Leftovers