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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Musing: Microsoft to offer its software on Linux – A theoretical consideration. Roy Schestowitz 1 20/07/2014 - 10:36am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/07/2014 - 10:19am
Story First Android One phone landing in October? Rianne Schestowitz 20/07/2014 - 5:29am
Story Tor, trust and the NSA Rianne Schestowitz 20/07/2014 - 3:08am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:49pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:48pm
Story [Pictures] Samsung Z (SM-Z910F) Tizen in Gold Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:27pm
Story Chromecast Now Lets Users Move Android Content to Their TVs Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:10pm
Story Faults in Linux 2.6 Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:07pm

LinuxQuestions.org Turns 8

Filed under
Web

linuxquestions.org: It was on June 25, 2000 that I made the very first post at LQ, introducing it to the world. Fast forward eight years and we have almost 3,200,000 posts and over 350,000 registered members.

Dear Microsoft, thanks for the help, Linux

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: You gotta love it. Microsoft has decided that it will ho ahead and kill off easy access to XP on June 30th. On behalf of desktop Linux users everywhere, and our first cousins, the Mac fans, thanks. You've given us the best shot we'll ever have of taking the desktop.

OxygenOffice-2.4.1 Blues on Mandriva 2008 PowerPack

Filed under
Software

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Enough Open XML and ODF battle for standards. The topic of "which is the better" apart, the bare truth is that many people have to deal with docx, xlsx and pptx files, willingly or unwillingly.

PackageKit finds sweet spot in quest for universal package tools

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Different GNU/Linux distributions provide incompatible systems for package management, and to date no one has quite figured out a foolproof way to get the best of them all. But where the alien utility tries to convert between major package formats, and Smart and Klik try to imagine new, universal forms of software installation, PackageKit has the more modest goal of supplying a universal front end that leaves the native package systems intact underneath.

A Cow Says Moo!

Filed under
Software

cookingwithlinux.com: Once upon a time, ASCII art was practiced in e-mail messages sent around the world. Unfortunately, fancy fonts and HTML-ized e-mails have struck a powerful blow to this ancient and noble art form. The most missed are probably the cows, for Tony Monroe, anyhow.

Do we really need another packaging system?

Filed under
Software

loupgaroublond.blogspot: Recently I've been quoted by Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols for questioning the need for the LSB Package API. The kind of conversation going on over the LSB Package API has been a recurring theme ever since I started using Linux, and it contains quite a few fallacies I would like to put down.

First Significant Disappointments with Linux

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I've run into the first significant problems with Linux on my laptops. I had pretty much decided to go with a dual-boot XP/Ubuntu setup on my main laptop (S6510), the same as what I am currently using on the test laptop (S2110). So I tried it... and uh-oh...

The new wave of Linux Lite – lean, mean and green

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Linux is coming to an ultraportable near you! There’s no denying the smash-hit success Linux is enjoying in the budget price ultraportable market. These are the Linux desktops that will catch on and here’s why.

4 Little Known Thunderbird Extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux-blog.org: I recently searched through the mozilla thunderbird extensions website and found 4 extensions that I didn't know about that actually prove to be quite useful. I use Thunderbird 2.0.0.12 on Foresight Linux and have tested all of these extensions and verified that they work on that environment.

7 young GNOME apps from a new generation

Filed under
Software

blogs.gnome.org/bolsh: With the recent discussion in blogs around the GNOME world, it can be easy to forget that there have been some great new applications for GNOME appearing recently. Many of these are written by a new breed of GNOME developer.

Will the internet really improve the way we think?

Filed under
Linux

In a recent interview with the British Sunday Observer, Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia, claimed that “it’s the next billion [internet users] who will change the way we think”. Such a big claim deserves some critical house room. Will the internet really change the way we think? Or are we just getting carried away?

Kubuntu 8.04: Hello Old Friend

Filed under
Ubuntu

raiden.net: Have you ever run into an old friend, whom you've not seen in a long time? I experienced this recently with a Kubuntu install. You see, I used to be a heavy KDE user and really loved using it. I took the time to look at a few other distributions before deciding to give Kubuntu a shot.

Ubuntu Linux not for ! Puppy Linux Rocks.

Filed under
Linux

blog.creativewebsaz: So a friend gave me her old computer and says ‘ I can’t use it, it has a virus or something’. Turns out it didn’t have a virus it had a huge problem with the hardrive. Of course with all the buzz I immediately went to Ubuntu. It was a wrong decision.

20 Reasons Linux Users Like Linux (and you might, too)

Filed under
Linux

suseblog.com: One of the major inhibitors to the spreading of Linux, as I see it, is that people don’t know why they should try it. Other reasons may include lack of support for their favorite game, or that Photoshop doesn’t run on Linux. For those of us who weren’t stopped by those reasons, why did we switch? What is it about Linux that makes it a viable alternative?

Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch

Filed under
MDV
SUSE
-s

Last fall when the two mega-distros openSUSE and Mandriva both hit the mirrors, it was difficult to decide which I liked better. In an attempt to narrow it down, I ran some light-hearted tests and found Mandriva won out in a side-by-side comparison. But things change rapidly in the Linux world and I wondered how a competition of the newest releases would come out. Mandriva 2008.1 was released this past April and openSUSE 11.0 was released just last week.

24 hours with openSUSE 11.0

Filed under
SUSE

bear454.blogspot: 24 hours. Not 'a day'; not figuratively; I've spent 24 hours with the recently released update to my long-running favorite OS. OpenSUSE Linux 11.0 is revolutionary, but my enthusiasm is tempered by substantial regressions.

Also: OpenSUSE 11.0 on a Lenovo ThinkPad T61

few early howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Firefox 3 Tips & Tricks

  • Quick documents from the desktop
  • How to personalize a package’s CFLAGS in Gentoo
  • Resolve Windows (Netbios) Hostname in Ubuntu
  • Simple Perl Script To Ease Console Server Use On Linux And Unix
  • How to install Mplayer codecs in openSUSE 11-x86_64

Kernel space: drivers that don't make the kernel scene

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Linux supports most hardware "out of the box" without adding a driver. Most of the missing drivers are proprietary, from uncooperative manufacturers, but there are a few where the license is right but the actual code is still missing. Why?

Another Programming Language for Kids, but This One Is Impressive

Filed under
Software

codingexperiments.com: I just spent today spending my time with an interesting little app, Scratch. It’s a cool little application that introduces children and early teens to programming and animation.

My Newfound Love for Xfce!

Filed under
Software

ericsbinaryworld.com/blogs: For the past week to two weeks I’ve done something I had’t done in years - I switched my default desktop environment in my GDM login screen. I’ve been logging into Xfce instead of my usual Gnome. There are basically three reasons why I’m loving Xfce over Gnome.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.