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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 16 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story eNcade Portable Raspberry Pi Gaming Console (video) Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2014 - 9:19am
Story Nominate your heroes for the Free Software Awards Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2014 - 8:50am
Story Kano: The Can-Do Coding Kit for Kids of All Ages Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2014 - 8:33am
Story Early announce: Qt4 removal in Jessie+1 Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2014 - 8:19am
Story Open-source startups need to be first in order to succeed: Intel Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2014 - 8:05am
Story OpenELEC 5.0 Prepares To Take On Kodi, Runs With LibreSSL Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2014 - 7:55am
Story Avis Budget Shifts to Linux to Cut Software Costs in Half Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2014 - 7:31am
Story Top tips for making your Embedded Linux device secure Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2014 - 7:25am
Story Smartphone Operating System Market Share Visualization Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2014 - 7:04am
Story Plasma-nm 0.9.3.5 release Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 10:48pm

Netbook runs Debian on China-made CPU

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: A Chinese vendor of microprocessors and computer systems will reportedly soon ship a low-cost "netbook" with an 8.9-inch display, Debian Linux-based software, and a Chinese-made processor.

Enhance Your Clipboard with a Clipboard Manager

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: The clipboard system in Linux (X11 to be more specific) recives complaints from users who expect it to work differently when applications are closed. The problem is that when content is copied from an application and the application is closed, the clipboard item will be cleared. I ran into this problem recently.

Intrepid Lands On My Workstation

Filed under
Ubuntu

thelinuxlink.net: Yeah, I know it is still a few days off from official release, but true to form, I grabbed it for my workstation at work before the rush. I simply changed my /etc/apt/source.list to point from hardy to intrepid, sudo aptitude update, sudo aptitude dist-upgrade and about an hour later I was rebooting.

Think Firefox 3 is fast? Try Firefox Minefield

Filed under
Moz/FF

news.cnet: A colleague today showed me a cool, new browser that he's been using to browse the web at blisteringly fast speeds. The browser? Minefield. The author of the code? Mozilla.

Simply Mepis 8 Keeps Getting Better

Filed under
Linux

preacherpen.wordpress: Linux powers both of my computers, and Simply Mepis is the distribution of choice for many reasons. I have been using Simply Mepis several years, and and have no desire to even test other distros; there were some brief stints with Linux Mint and PCLOS, but Mepis is my OS.

Definitive Ubuntu 8.10 artwork

Filed under
Ubuntu

celettu.wordpress: I decided to beat the rush and install the Beta of Ubuntu 8.10 this evening. At first I was greeted with the Beta artwork, which I found slightly disappointing, as have others before me.

Open source - it's all about choice

Filed under
OSS

stuff.co.nz: There have always been people in society who help others just because they can - the cub scout leader, the charity volunteer, the community clean up group, they all contribute to making the world a better place.

Using Gmusicbrowser takes a lot of getting used to

Filed under
Software

newlinuxuser.com: Rhythmbox is the default on Ubuntu and these days I find VLC’s user interface too limited when it comes to playing music files. I’d rather stick with Rhythmbox.

9 tips for Ubuntu notebook users

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntukungfu.org/blog: Here are some tips for Ubuntu users who use notebook computers, including how to sync files effortlessly between a laptop and desktop, how to switch CPU speeds on the fly from the desktop, how to power-save your hard disk, and more.

STUX 2.0 exhibits major improvements

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: STUX 2.0, released last month, is a remarkable improvement from the 0.9.2 release I reviewed a couple years ago. While the look and feel of the Slackware-based distribution have stayed pretty much the same, STUX lacks the glaring technical problems that made it unusable on the previous occasion.

Linux Creator Linus Torvalds, Others Honored In Silicon Valley

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: The Computer History Museum Tuesday night honored three legends in the industry, including Linux-creator Linus Torvalds whose operating system became the catalyst for the open-source software movement that challenged traditional concepts of intellectual property.

Debian Lenny Slogan Contest

Filed under
Linux

ducea.com: The Debian Art team is seeking a slogan for the next stable release, Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 “Lenny”.

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 3 Now Available

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The openSUSE Project is proud to announce the availability of beta 3 of the 11.1 release. It’s a few days late, but much better for the delay. Beta 3 is now available for immediate download and testing.

When installing, do you...

Annual Kaspersky Labs Fearmongering (2008 Edition)!

Its that time of year again! Merry Fearmongering everybody!

few odds & ends

Filed under
Linux
  • Ubuntu is... umm.. kinda f-ed

  • How to Break Up With the Linux Community
  • 7 Reasons to Pick Ubuntu and When Not to Choose It
  • Ten Commandments for New Linux Users

Introducing Open Source to the World - Part 3

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: Switching users who are uncommitted, or can't switch cold turkey, are some of the hardest. One of the easiest ways I've found to help them make the switch is to do a multistep plan with them, similar to how smokers or others do in order to quit.

Review: Slax 6.0.7

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: For some reason, I didn’t get Linux Format Magazine issue #110 when I was supposed to. I ordered another copy and it arrived recently, so it’s time for another slate of Linux reviews.

Why Microsoft Wants Us to Get All Mixed Up

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: “What's in a name?” some bloke in the sixteenth century once asked. As Microsoft knows, quite a lot. What you call something can have a major influence on how you think about it. So how Microsoft talks about free software is important – not least for the clues that it gives about its latest tactical move to defang the open source threat.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.28 - Part 3: Dodgy drivers

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: At the Kernel Summit a few weeks ago, kernel hackers accepted the "linux-staging" development tree into the main development tree (1, 2) (Kernel-Summit). Greg Kroah-Hartman started linux-staging a few months ago as a place to bring together open source drivers that are maintained independently of the official Linux kernel but do not satisfy the kernel developers' quality requirements.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: GNOME Shell, Bug Tracking, GXml

  • How to Install GNOME Shell Extensions GUI / CLI
    GNOME Shell extensions are small and lightweight pieces of codes that enhance GNOME desktop’s functionality and improves the user experience. They are the equivalent of add-ons in your browser. For instance, you can have add-ons that download videos like IDM downloader or block annoying ads such as Adblocker. Similarly, GNOME extensions perform certain tasks e.g. Display weather and geolocation. One of the tools used to install and customize GNOME Shell extensions is the GNOME tweak tool. It comes pre-installed in the latest Linux distributions. This article we cover how to install GNOME Shell extensions from GUI and from the command line on various Linux distros.
  • Musings on bug trackers
    I love bugzilla, I really do. I’ve used it nearly my entire career in free software. I know it well, I like the command line tool integration. But I’ve never had a day in bugzilla where I managed to resolve/triage/close nearly 100 issues. I managed to do that today with our gitlab instance and I didn’t even mean to.
  • ABI stability for GXml
    I’m taking a deep travel across Vala code; trying to figure out how things work. With my resent work on abstract methods for compact classes, may I have an idea on how to provide ABI stability to GXml. GXml have lot of interfaces for DOM4, implemented in classes, like Gom* series. But they are a lot, so go for each and add annotations, like Gee did, to improve ABI, is a hard work.

More on Barcelona Moving to Free Software

  • Barcelona Aims To Oust Microsoft In Open Source Drive
    The city of Barcelona has embarked on an ambitious open source effort aimed at reducing its dependence on large proprietary software vendors such as Microsoft, including the replacement of both applications and operating systems.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft software for open source software
    Barcelona, one of the most popular cities in the Europe is now switching to open-source software by replacing Microsoft Windows, Office and Exchange with Linux, Libre Office and Open Xchange respectively. The city council is already piloting the use of Ubuntu Linux desktops along with Mozilla Firefox as the default browser. With this move, Barcelona city is planning to save money over the years by reducing software/service licensing fees. They are also planning to hire new developers to write open-source software. The open-source product will also be made available to other Spanish municipalities and public bodies further afield allowing them the opportunity to save money on software licences.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft in favour of open source Linux software
    Catalan capital Barcelona is planning to ditch proprietary software products from Microsoft in favour of free, open source alternatives such as Open-Xchange email. That’s according to a report by Spain's national paper El Pais, which reports that Barcelona plans to invest 70% of its annual software budget in open source this year.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source turns 20
    While open source software is ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental infrastructure component as well as a critical factor for driving innovation, the "open source" label was coined only 20 years ago. The concept of open source software - as opposed to free software or freeware - is credited to Netscape which, in January 1998, announced plans to release the source code of its proprietary browser, Navigator, under a license that would freely permit modification and redistribution. This code is today the basis for Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird. The Open Source Initiative (OSI) regards that event as the point at which "software freedom extended its reach beyond the enthusiast community and began its ascent into the mainstream".
  • Coreboot 4.7 Released With 47 More Motherboards Supported, AMD Stoney Ridge
    Coreboot 4.7 is now available as the latest release of this free and open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement. Coreboot 4.7 is the latest tagged release for this project developed via Git. This release has initial support for AMD Stoney Ridge platforms, Intel ICH10 Southbridge support, Intel Denverton/Denverton-NS platform support, and initial work on supporting next-gen Intel Cannonlake platforms.
  • Thank you CUSEC!
    Last week, I spoke at CUSEC (Canadian Undergraduate Software Engineering Conference) in Montreal.   I really enjoy speaking with students and learning what they are working on.  They are the future of our industry!  I was so impressed by the level of organization and the kindness and thoughtfulness of the CUSEC organizing committee who were all students from various universities across Canada. I hope that you all are enjoying some much needed rest after your tremendous work in the months approaching the conference and last week.
  • Percona Announces Sneak Peek of Conference Breakout Sessions for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
  • The Universal Donor
    A few people reacted negatively to my article on why Public Domain software is broadly unsuitable for inclusion in a community open source project. Most argued that because public domain gave them the rights they need where they live (mostly the USA), I should not say it was wrong to use it. That demonstrates either parochialism or a misunderstanding of what public domain really means. It should not be used for the same reason code known to be subject to software patents should not be used — namely that only code that, to the best efforts possible, can be used by anyone, anywhere without the need to ask permission (e.g. by buying a patent license) or check it it’s needed (e.g. is that PD code PD here?) can be used in an open source project. Public domain fails the test for multiple reasons: global differences in copyright term, copyright as an unalienable moral rather than as a property right, and more. Yes, public domain may give you the rights you need. But in an open source project, it’s not enough for you to determine you personally have the rights you need. In order to function, every user and contributor of the project needs prior confidence they can use, improve and share the code, regardless of their location or the use to which they put it. That confidence also has to extend to their colleagues, customers and community as well.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04, Lubuntu 17.04 EoL

  • Ubuntu Core: A secure open source OS for IoT
    Canonical's Ubuntu Core, a tiny, transactional version of the Ubuntu Linux OS for IoT devices, runs highly secure Linux application packages, known as "snaps," that can be upgraded remotely.
  • Introducing the Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04
    Ubuntu’s changed a lot in the last year, and everything is leading up to a really exciting event: the release of 18.04 LTS! This next version of Ubuntu will once again offer a stable foundation for countless humans who use computers for work, play, art, relaxation, and creation. Among the various visual refreshes of Ubuntu, it’s also time to go to the community and ask for the best wallpapers. And it’s also time to look for a new video and music file that will be waiting for Ubuntu users on the install media’s Examples folder, to reassure them that their video and sound drivers are quite operational. Long-term support releases like Ubuntu 18.04 LTS are very important, because they are downloaded and installed ten times more often than every single interim release combined. That means that the wallpapers, video, and music that are shipped will be seen ten times more than in other releases. So artists, select your best works. Ubuntu enthusiasts, spread the word about the contest as far and wide as you can. Everyone can help make this next LTS version of Ubuntu an amazing success.
  • Lubuntu 17.04 has reached End of Life
    The Lubuntu Team announces that as a non-LTS release, 17.04 has a 9-month support cycle and, as such, reached end of life on Saturday, January 13, 2018. Lubuntu will no longer provide bug fixes or security updates for 17.04, and we strongly recommend that you update to 17.10, which continues to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes.