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Saturday, 17 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Easy Peasy Eeebuntu Netbooks

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Recently I purchased an eeepc 1000H and was quite impressed with the new and different operating system. I hail from a windows only background and anything apart from the Microsoft offerings I have left well alone, until NOW.

ReactOS Attempts to Clone Windows--A Heapin' Helpin' of Chutzpah!

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OS Now here is an open source (or at least partially open source) project that may have a strong chance of drawing legal action from Microsoft: ReactOS.

How to Learn Linux - Part I

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lovehateubuntu.blogspot: The first step to learning Linux is actually installing it. There are some pre-requisites to installing it yourself, as there would be with installing any operating system: you need some computer know-how.

The Netbook Experience Is A Little Less Shiny Right Now

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Caitlyn Martin: During the holidays I received some Hanukkah gelt from family specifically earmarked for buying myself a new computer. I ordered the one that seemed to give me the most power for the least money in a very small and lightweight case: a Sylvania g Netbook.

Linux-based HP Mini Mi ships with command line disabled

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Linux Yesterday, while looking through the Comdex news feeds, I stumbled across a Mini Mi 1000 HP product announcement from HP. What caught my eye on the product page wasn't the description of the GUI, it was what followed on the next line. Preceded by "Please note" in bold, the HP page states "the Linux command line interface is disabled on this edition."

Biting into the Linux Sandwich of 2009

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blogs.the451group: I wrote last year about how 2008 would be the ‘Year of Non-desktop Linux’. As we embark on 2009, I have a similar view, but in keeping with all of the turkey and ham and leftovers from the holidays and to present a more appetizing analogy, I envision the ‘2009 Linux Sandwich.’

Did Vietnam take open source too far?

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Dana Blankenhorn: It’s what every red-blooded capitalist with a Microsoft button most fears, and rails against here and elsewhere, especially when we talk about open source in the developing world. Mandate open source?

Ways YOU can contribute to Ubuntu

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meandubuntu.wordpress: I thought I might make a list of ways to contribute to Ubuntu (or Linux in general), and provide my thoughts on them. I’ve tried to list them in rough order of “difficulty”, from easy to hard, where difficulty means how much effort it takes.

ViewSonic is even jumping into netbook game

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Hardware Is there anyone NOT making netbooks these days? ViewSonic, best known for making monitors, digital picture frames and projectors, has hopped into the netbook game, launching the VieBook.

Pixel’s departure from Mandriva

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blog.mandriva: Pixel will be leaving Mandriva on February. We would like to take the opportunity to thank him for his commitment and endeavour whilst at Mandriva and we wish him every success in his future activities.

The 2008 Linux and free software timeline

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OSS 2008 proved to be an interesting year, with great progress in useful software that made our systems better. Of course, there were some of the usual conflicts. Here is LWN's eleventh annual timeline of significant events in the Linux and free software world for the year.

A New, Easy To Use Disk Formatter For GNOME

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Software GParted is not exactly the ideal program for new Linux users to familiarize themselves with if all they want to do is format a USB drive or external storage device. Fortunately, a new GNOME utility has come about that is designed to be simple yet powerful.

Review: OpenSuSE 11.1

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vwbusguy.wordpress: I am a fan of the gnome desktop. I respect KDE, but don’t use it, and to be fair didn’t try the KDE version of openSuSE. Since OpenSuSE ships gnome 2.24, I had assumed my UI experience would be somewhat similar.

16 Free Games - Part 3

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Gaming Didn’t get enough games in part 2? Here are some more!

Turn Your Ubuntu Intrepid Into Mac OSX Leopard

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Ubuntu This is an updated version of my previous post Turn Ubuntu Hardy into Mac OSX. That post was written six months ago and many things have changed during this period of time. vs. Go-OO: Cutting through the Gordian Knot

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OOo Is (OOo), the popular free office application, "a profoundly sick project," as developer Michael Meeks alleges? Or are his comments a poorly concealed effort to promote Go-OO, Novell's version of OOo, as the anti-Novell lobby suggests?

Help On The Way: Five Great Linux Support Sites

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Linux Linux support and documentation sites are a dime a dozen -- and some aren't worth much more than that. Here are a few sites that really give you your money's worth . . . or at least they would, if most of the content wasn't already free.

Artwork for Ubuntu Jaunty Already Impressive

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  • Artwork for Ubuntu Jaunty Already Impressive

  • Jaunty Jackalope - New Volume Control Applet

Goodbye openSUSE. Hello Linux Mint.

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alternativenayk.wordpress: Enough is enough. After numerous attempts to get openSUSE 11.1 working, including many many reinstalls, I finally erased everything in favour of Linux Mint 6 (Felicia… whatever that means!).

today's leftovers

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  • Turn Your Linux Desktop into an Alarm Clock

  • Navigate on Linux command shell history
  • A gentle introduction to video encoding, part 4: captioning
  • How To Create Your Own IRC Chat Channel
  • Linux CLI (Command Line Interface) Tricks
  • The CentOS Test
  • Linux netbooks to hit the UK highstreet
  • Dell Mini 9 gets 64GB SSD option for Linux
  • EMTEC to Reveal Gdium Mobile Netbook at CES
  • rm -rf /
  • Migration Assistant In Ubuntu 9.04
  • OpenSuse 11.1 Day 3 Disaster
  • An Update on OpenSUSE 11.1
  • Interview With Pat Tiernan of Climate Savers Computing
  • Red Hat, Ingres Put Twist On LAMP Developer Stack
  • Mot taps Linux for rugged mobile phone
  • Packaging Quality
  • Linux breadboard targets wireless geo-location
  • Funtoo and Sunrise
  • Why Desktop Linux Holds Its Own Against OS X
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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • What Is Fuchsia, Google’s New Operating System?
    Fuchsia first popped up on the tech world’s radar in mid-2016, when an unannounced open source project from Google appeared on the GitHub repository. According to initial inspection by the technology press, it was designed to be a “universal” operating system, capable of running on everything from low-power smartwatches to powerful desktops. That potentially includes phones, tablets, laptops, car electronics, connected appliances, smarthome hardware, and more.
  • Google created an AI-based, open source music synthesizer
    Move over musicians, AI is here. Google's 'NSynth' neural network is designed to take existing sounds and combine them using a complex, machine learning algorithm. The result? Thousands of new musical sounds, and an instrument you can play them on.
  • March Add(on)ness: uBlock (1) vs Kimetrack (4)
  • TenFourFox FPR6 SPR1 coming
    Stand by for FPR6 Security Parity Release 1 due to the usual turmoil following Pwn2Own, in which the mighty typically fall and this year Firefox did. We track these advisories and always plan to have a patched build of TenFourFox ready and parallel with Mozilla's official chemspill release; I have already backported the patch and tested it internally.
  • GCC 8 Compiler Offering More Helpful Debug Messages, Usability Improvements
    Red Hat's David Malcom has outlined some of the usability improvements coming with the imminent release of GCC 8.
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time changed: March 16th starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC
  • Your guide to LibrePlanet 2018, wherever you are, March 24-25
    The free software community encompasses the globe, and we strive to make the LibrePlanet conference reflect that. That's why we livestream the proceedings of the conference, and encourage you to participate remotely by both watching and participating in the discussion via IRC.
  • Open Source Advocate Dr. Joshua Pearce Publishes Paper on Inexpensive GMAW Metal 3D Printing
    One of the most outspoken advocates of open source philosophy in the 3D printing industry is Dr. Joshua M. Pearce, Associate Professor, Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering for Michigan Technological University (Michigan Tech).
  • ONF Launches Stratum Open-Source SDN Project
    The growing adoption of software-defined networking over the past several years has given a boost to makers of networking white boxes. The separation of the network operating system, control plane and network tasks from the underlying proprietary hardware meant that organizations could run that software on white-box switches and servers that are less expensive than those systems from the likes of Cisco Systems, Juniper Networks, Dell EMC and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Network virtualization technologies such as software-defined networking (SDN) and network-functions virtualization (NFV) have proven to be a particular boon for hyperscale cloud providers like Google and Facebook and telecommunications companies like AT&T and Verizon, which are pushing increasingly massive amounts of traffic through their growing infrastructures. Being able to use less expensive and easily manageable white boxes from original design manufacturers (ODMs) has helped these organizations keep costs down even as demand rises.

KDE: Discover, Qt Creator, LibAlkimia

  • This week in Discover, part 10
    This week saw many positive changes for Discover, and I feel that it’s really coming into its own. Discover rumbles inexorably along toward the finish line of becoming the most-loved Linux app store!
  • Qt Creator 4.6 RC & Qt 5.11 Beta 2 Released
    The Qt Company has some new software development releases available in time for weekend testing. First up is the Qt Creator 4.6 Release Candidate. Qt Creator 4.6 has been working on better C++17 feature support, Clang-Tidy and Clazy warnings are now integrated into the diagnostic messages for the C++ editor, new filters, and improvements to the model editor.
  • LibAlkimia 7.0.1 with support for MPIR released
    LibAlkimia is a base library that contains support for financial applications based on the Qt C++ framework. One of its main features is the encapsulation of The GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library (GMP) and so providing a simple object to be used representing monetary values in the form of rational numbers. All the mathematical details are hidden inside the AlkValue object.
  • Last Weeks Activity in Elisa and Release Schedule
    Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users. We focus on a very good integration with the Plasma desktop of the KDE community without compromising the support for other platforms (other Linux desktop environments, Windows and Android). We are creating a reliable product that is a joy to use and respects our users privacy. As such, we will prefer to support online services where users are in control of their data.

SwagArch 18.02 - U Got Swag?

SwagArch sounds like an interesting concept. The aesthetic side of things is reasonable, although brown as a color and a dark theme make for a tricky choice. The fonts are pretty good overall. But the visual element is the least of the distro's problems. SwagArch 18.02 didn't deliver the basics, and that's what made Dedoimedo sad. Network support plus the clock issue, horrible package management and broken programs, those are things that must work perfectly. Without them, the system has no value. So you do get multimedia support and a few unique apps, however that cannot balance out all the woes and problems that I encountered. All in all, Swag needs a lot more work. Also, it will have a tough time competing with Manjaro and Antergos, which are already established and fairly robust Arch spins. Lastly, it needs to narrow down its focus. The overall integration of elements is pretty weak. Eclectic, jumbled, not really tested. 2/10 for now. Let's see how it evolves. Read more

How Open Source Approach is Impacting Science

Dive into the exciting world of Innovative Science to explore and find out about how the Linux-based Operating System and Open Source are playing a significant role in the major scientific breakthroughs that are taking place in our daily lives. Read more