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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Geek Software of the Week: Clonezilla! srlinuxx 20/08/2011 - 5:45pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 189 is out srlinuxx 20/08/2011 - 5:43pm
Story Linux and the Tyranny of the Default srlinuxx 1 20/08/2011 - 4:12pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 20/08/2011 - 6:29am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 20/08/2011 - 5:41am
Story HP Should Open Source WebOS srlinuxx 20/08/2011 - 3:09am
Story Three Great Mindmapping Tools for the Linux Desktop srlinuxx 20/08/2011 - 3:06am
Story World's largest single-school XO laptop solar power deployment srlinuxx 20/08/2011 - 12:46am
Story 22 Greatest Graphics Cards Of All Time srlinuxx 20/08/2011 - 12:43am
Story Linux Journal Goes 100% Digital srlinuxx 20/08/2011 - 12:41am

How to setup fglrx for Ubuntu Feisty

Filed under
HowTos

It took me so long to setup fglrx driver for ATI Mobility X300 in my laptop, IBM Thinkpad T43. Actually, the ATI open source driver comes with Xorg 7.2 works very well except he open source driver does not support 3D acceleration for ATI Mobility X300. . There are so many howto but none of them worked for me.

OS/2 is 20 years old today

Filed under
OS

IF OUR CALENDARS serve us right, April 2007 means twenty years have passed since the initial "Microsoft-IBM OS/2 1.0" announcement. But the story of OS/2 is not always told right.

Problem with ATI driver

Filed under
HowTos

I had installed the xorg-driver-fglrx (ATI’s fglrx driver) through Apt in my Kubuntu Feisty box and it was working fine after reconfiguring using dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg and without installing the linux-restricted-modules.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 196

Filed under
Linux

Compiz and Beryl Merger

Filed under
Software

It isn’t official yet, but Compiz and Beryl are merging. For the last few weeks I have been following the mailing list discussions on this topic. A lot of the work has been started. It is sort of unofficially announced, so I feel now is as good a time as any to comment. First some back story:

When Will AIGLX Come For ATI?

Filed under
Software

For months now Radeon/FireGL owners have been wondering whether or not ATI Technologies / Advanced Micro Devices is actively working on AIGLX support for their official drivers or whether they will even support it with their binary fglrx drivers.

Canonical Launches Beta of Launchpad 1.0

One of the major advantages of open source software development is the collaborative efforts between the members of any given project. But what happens when projects don't talk to each other? That's where a web-based collaboration service like Launchpad comes in.

Ripping video out from DVD and VCD with mplayer

Filed under
HowTos

First of all, how to play DVD and VCD using mplayer?

mplayer -fs dvd://1

The line shows the play dvd first track in fullscreen, further more if you wanna play in certain language?

mplayer -fs dvd://1 -alang de

The same way goes to vcd.

mplayer -fs vcd://1

synergy in openSUSE 10.2 made even easier than before

Filed under
HowTos

Since last week, I have continued using synergy between my desktop and my laptop. I did get tired of running it manually from the command line every time I wanted to load it up. Because of this, I wrote some bash scripts. To start the server and client wasn't rocket science.

To start the synergy server, this is my bash script:

!#/bin/sh

The Busy Java Developer’s Guide to db4o

Filed under
HowTos

An object database like db4o simply has more to offer to object-oriented developers, in today's object-oriented world, than its relational cousins.

Download podcasts and sync music automatically with podget

Many so-called podcatchers have shown up to help users download podcasts on request. Most of them are great applications, but what do you do when you want all of your podcasts downloaded automatically and synced to your MP3 player?

Command line tips - checking a folder’s disk usage with du

Filed under
HowTos

Konqueror is one of my favourite file managers on any platform (add OS X’s Finder column view and it would be the best). Why? Well, amongs many other features, it has a view called File Size View, that allows you to see how much space folders and files are taking up visually, and makes it really easy to see what files need cleaning up and deleting.

Securing Apache Web Server from information leakage

Filed under
HowTos

By default, most pre-packaged apache installations come with full information leakage, so if you telnet to port 80 on your webserver you can check, just type in the GET / HTTP/1.1 line, then hit enter twice

KDE Commit Digest 51: Phonon, Decibel, and KsirK

Filed under
KDE
-s

Since our good friend liquidat is taking a vacation, on a business trip, or having a kidney removed, I thought I'd try to brief folks on the latest KDE commit digest.

Linux reloaded

Filed under
Linux

When Linux first made its way onto the radar in the mid-1990s, one of its most touted advantages was its ability to give ageing computers a new lease on life.

At the time many people found the newest versions of Microsoft Windows and Office demanded more power than their systems could deliver. Linux, on the other hand, could run on the smell of an oily rag.

Linux Gazette April 2007 (#137) Issue Online

Filed under
Linux

This month's Linux Gazette is up and ready to read.

Some of this months topics include:

* Cursor Appearance in the Linux Console, by Anonymous
* Getting Started with Linux Mint, by Shane Lazar
* Measuring Congestion Windows of TCP Senders, by René Pfeiffer

How to find files in a remote Windows network from Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Scanning a network remotely is not always an easy task. It is even more difficult when different operating systems are involved. Here's how you can scan an entire tcp/ip range of Windows computers from a Kubuntu Linux box. This is very basic and serves as an example but it is usefull for learning which computers have mp3's or pr0n when they shouldn't have.

Oracle Linux adopters labelled 'idiots'

Filed under
Linux

One of the first converts to Oracle's support for Linux has revealed the public backlash it has endured since their decision to drop Red Hat.

Melbourne company Opes Prime Stockbroking told ZDNet Australia that in the weeks following its announcement to adopt Oracle Linux, upset Linux enthusiasts phoned, e-mailed and wrote about the company online to complain at the decision.

The Sorry State of WiFi Support with Feisty Beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

I have been keeping up with most of the reviews for the new beta release of Ubuntu Feisty with great interest. As a full-time user of Ubuntu Dapper and Edgy, I’m, to say the least, "comfortable" in all aspects of getting the most from my Linux experience.

Easily Convert .WMA to .MP3 in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

If, like me, you find that the majority of applications outside of the fuzzy, feel good realm of Windows do not inherently recognize .wma file format, then this script help you out.

Open up a file named wma2mp3 in your favorite editor, copy and paste the following code, then save. Don't forget to 'chmod +x wma2mp3' when you're finished so you can execute the script.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Debugging gnome-session problems on Ubuntu 14.04
  • Introducing snapd-glib
  • An awesome experience!
    GUADEC has been a week full of memorable moments. As my friend Rares mentioned in his post, our newcomers group was welcomed by friendly community members right as we arrived at the hotel. For someone who has never attended a similar event before, this really helped with getting into the conference atmosphere. In the first couple days of the conference, I found myself meeting a lot of people that I knew from IRC. It felt really nice to finally know the person behind the internet nick. I was especially excited about getting to meet my mentor, Carlos Soriano =). In between the presentations I also took the time to prepare my own lightning talk about compressed files in Nautilus. Speaking in front of the GNOME community for the first time was a unique experience.
  • Commvault Announces Support of Red Hat Virtualization 4 with Commvault Software
  • Modularity Infrastructure Design
    The purpose of our Modularity initiative is to support the building, maintaining, and shipping of modular things. So, in order to ensure these three requirements are met, we need to design a framework for building and composing the distribution. In terms of the framework, in general, we are concerned about the possibility of creating an exponential number of component combinations with independent lifecycles. That is, when the number of component combinations becomes too large, we will not be able to manage them. So that we don’t accidentally make our lives worse, we must limit the number of supported modules with a policy and provide infrastructure automation to reduce the amount of manual work required.
  • more, less, and a story of typical Unix fossilization
    In the beginning, by which we mean V7, Unix didn't have a pager at all. That was okay; Unix wasn't very visual in those days, partly because it was still sort of the era of the hard copy terminal. Then along came Berkeley and BSD. People at Berkeley were into CRT terminals, and so BSD Unix gave us things like vi and the first pager program, more (which showed up quite early, in 3BSD, although this isn't as early as vi, which appears in 2BSD). Calling a pager more is a little bit odd but it's a Unix type of name and from the beginning more prompted you with '--More--' at the bottom of the screen. All of the Unix vendors that based their work on BSD Unix (like Sun and DEC) naturally shipped versions of more along with the rest of the BSD programs, and so more spread around the BSD side of things. However, more was by no means the best pager ever; as you might expect, it was actually a bit primitive and lacking in features. So fairly early on Mark Nudelman wrote a pager with somewhat more features and it wound up being called less as somewhat of a joke. When less was distributed via Usenet's net.sources in 1985 it became immediately popular, as everyone could see that it was clearly nicer than more, and pretty soon it was reasonably ubiquitous on Unix machines (or at least ones that had some degree of access to stuff from Usenet). In 4.3 BSD, more itself picked up the 'page backwards' feature that had motived Mark Nudelman to write less, cf the 4.3BSD manpage, but this wasn't the only attraction of less. And this is where we get into Unix fossilization.
  • PNScan Linux Trojan Resurfaces with New Attacks Targeting Routers in India
    A trojan thought to have died out resurfaced with new attacks and a new and improved version, launching new attacks on routers running Linux-based firmware located in India's cyber-space.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • 4 tips for teaching kids how to build electronics
    Kids are naturally curious about how things work, and with a new trend in hardware companies creating open source hardware products, it's a great time to teach kids about electronics. But modern technology can seem too complex to even begin to understand. So where do you start?
  • Oil companies joining open source world by sharing data [Ed: No, oil companies, sharing data is open data and not open source. More openwashing, like greenwashing]
    The oil and gas industry has long collected huge volumes of data, but it hasn’t always known quite what to do with it all. Often, the terabytes aren’t even stored on computer systems that readily talk to each other. Industry insiders are used to it, said Michael Jones, senior director of strategy at the oil and gas software maker Landmark. But it’s not OK, he said. So, about a year ago, Jones and some of his oil industry colleagues set about to fix it. This week, at Landmark’s Innovation Forum & Expo at the Westin hotel in northwest Houston, the company unveiled the beginnings of a collaborative its members called groundbreaking. In a move to drive technology further, faster — and, perhaps, take a bigger piece of the burgeoning big-data market — Landmark is pushing its main computing platform into the cloud, for all to use.
  • Interactive, open source visualizations of nocturnal bird migrations in near real-time
    New flow visualizations using data from weather radar networks depict nocturnal bird migrations, according to a study published August 24, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Judy Shamoun-Baranes from University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and colleagues.
  • Go! Speed Racer Go!
    I finally reached a point where I could start running the go version of sm-photo-tool. I finished the option validation for the list command. While I was testing it I noticed how much faster the Go version felt. Here are the python vs Go versions of the commands.
  • Semantic Interoperability for European Public Services will be presented at the SEMANTiCS 2016 conference
    The revision of the European Interoperability Framework and the importance of data and information standardisation for promoting semantic interoperability for European Public Services will be presented by Dr. Vassilios Peristeras, DG Informatics, ISA unit at the SEMANTiCS 2016 conference which takes place in Leipzig on September 13th and 14th 2016. The title of the presentation is “Promoting Semantic Interoperability for European Public Services: the European Commission ISA2 Programme” (slideset to appear here soon).

Linux at 25: How Linux changed the world

I walked into an apartment in Boston on a sunny day in June 1995. It was small and bohemian, with the normal detritus a pair of young men would scatter here and there. On the kitchen table was a 15-inch CRT display married to a fat, coverless PC case sitting on its side, network cables streaking back to a hub in the living room. The screen displayed a mess of data, the contents of some logfile, and sitting at the bottom was a Bash root prompt decorated in red and blue, the cursor blinking lazily. I was no stranger to Unix, having spent plenty of time on commercial Unix systems like OSF/1, HP-UX, SunOS, and the newly christened Sun Solaris. But this was different. Read more

Linux Kernel News and Microsoft Breaks PowerShell

  • Coherent Accelerators, FPGAs, and PLD Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    It has been more than a decade since CPU core clock frequencies stopped doubling every 18 months, which has shifted the search for performance from the "hardware free lunch" to concurrency and, more recently, hardware accelerators. Beyond accelerating computational offload, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and programmable logic devices (PLDs) have long been used in the embedded space to provide ways to offload I/O or to implement timing-sensitive algorithms as close as possible to the pin.
  • Linux's brilliant career, in pictures
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.
  • Quarter Century of Innovation – aka Happy Birthday Linux!
    Happy birthday Linux. You’ve defined how we should be using and adoption technology. You’ve disrupted and continue to disrupt, industries all over the place. You’ve helped define what it means to share ideas openly and freely. You’ve shown what happens when we collaborate and work together. Free and Open Source is a win-win for all and Linux is the Gold Standard of that.
  • Microsoft Open Source Czar Takes Spotlight at LinuxCon [Ed: Microsoft paid for this]
  • Windows Update borks PowerShell – Microsoft won't fix it for a week
    You'd be forgiven for thinking Microsoft is actively trying to stop people using Windows 10 Anniversary Edition. A patch this week broke one of the key features of the OS: PowerShell.