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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Open Source Electronic Health Record Alliance Joins Open Source Initiative Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 10:55pm
Story How strong is peer review in open source? Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 10:53pm
Story These are the new faces of Android Wear Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 10:45pm
Story The Growing Linux on Power Ecosystem Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 10:39pm
Story 2014 Was the Year of Android Everywhere Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 10:36pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 “Rebecca” KDE RC released! Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 9:59pm
Story Get Out the Vote for LinuxQuestions.org Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 9:57pm
Story SuperX 3.0 Beta Released Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 9:54pm
Story Google and ODF Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 9:52pm
Story Microsoft tells J.S. Joust devs their game is “NOT possible” on Windows Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2014 - 9:09pm

Hands-on: OpenSolaris 2008.11 a major step forward for Sun

Filed under
OS

arstechnica.com: The OpenSolaris development community launched version 2008.11, its second release ever, Wednesday. It's still not capable of replacing Linux on the desktop, but it shows promise.

Fedora 10: A Mini Review

Filed under
Linux

bobbo.me.uk: I have used Ubuntu exclusively for almost 2 years now. In that time I have very rarely had contact with other distros. But with the release of both Fedora 10 and VMWare 6.5, what better time is there to check out the latest release from the Fedora team?

The five stages of community open source engagement

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: I wrote recently that the “five ages of vendor-led open source revenue strategies” I’d come up with wasn’t suitable for vendors that build a business around community-led projects.

Damn Small Linux 4.4.10 review

Filed under
Linux

itreviews.co.uk: As part of a survival toolkit, Damn Small Linux could be something of a saviour. Earlier this year, this writer used a previous release of the distribution to excise a couple of gigabytes of files from an otherwise-locked-down Vista installation.

Open source is dying -- or maybe it isn't

Filed under
OSS

Bill Snyder: Put three geeks in a room and it won't take long to start an argument. Well, analyst Dennis Byron, veteran open-source exec Stuart Cohen, and ex-Microsoft developer Keith Curtis weren't exactly in the same room, but all three have provocative opinions about the future of software in general and of open source in particular.

10 common mistakes made by Linux users

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: There are a few ubiquitous mistakes which a lot of Linux admins make while administering a Linux box. If kept in mind, these mistakes can be avoided to keep a smooth work flow.

The LXF Benchmark: Desktop environments

Filed under
Software

linuxformat.co.uk: Which Linux/Unix desktop environment will make you work and play faster? Marco Fioretti gets benchmarking to find out what's leading the pack, and what needs to go on a diet. On the scales: Gnome, KDE and Xfce, along with their file managers, terminals and text editors...

Open source does not need new buzzwords

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: At Springsource’s winter getaway this week, Forrester Research vice president John Rymer coined a clever new term to make the open source argument.

Quickly share your screenshots with JShot

Filed under
Software

linux.com: With the JShot screen capture and uploader utility, you can quickly put all or part of your screen on the Web and send a URL to it to a friend. JShot is free for noncommercial use, and is great when you want to show people a screen capture and don't want to have to deal with file names and upload permissions.

Opera 10 alpha claims Acid3 perfection

Filed under
Software

news.cnet.com: Thirteen-year-old Opera has been the perennial underdog in the browser wars, but Opera 10 alpha brings some unexpected firepower to the field. Unlike any other browser on the market, Opera 10 will comply fully with the Acid3 test.

IBM Virtual Desktop Bundles Lotus, Ubuntu Linux, to Freeze Out Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: IBM teams with Ubuntu provider Canonical and virtual desktop software maker Virtual Bridges on a bundle that lets systems administrators deliver open source Linux and Lotus messaging and collaboration software to desktops and workstations across remote offices.

Firefox Nightly Beats Chrome in Speed, Webkit Beats Both

Filed under
Moz/FF

linuxhaxor.net: We already knew that Firefox nighty beats Chrome in speed, the gap is getting wider with the latest Firefox builds (3.2a1pre). On the other hand webkit developers are quietly tweaking away its SquirrelFish engine for javascript speed increase.

Does Google Have a Secret OS?

Filed under
Google

internetnews.com: Net Applications noticed something unusual with stats from Google.com. One-third were unrecognized even though Net Applications' sensors can detect all major operating systems. Some Silicon Valley watchers think they know: the long-rumored software-as-a-service-oriented Google OS.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • OOo 3.0 and its new ugly splash screen

  • Fedora a bust, Back to running OpenSuse 11
  • How To Migrate From Evolution To Thunderbird
  • Move Over Open Source, Lean Software is the New Black for Developers
  • Sun patches at least 14 bugs in Java
  • GNOME 2.25.2 Released
  • A 1968 computer demo that changed people’s lives
  • FAIL: Docx plugins and interoperability solutions
  • Indian GNU/Linux advocate and independent FOSS consultant Raj Mathur
  • Linux Void - Episode 14 - Snow
  • Spectrum ZX81 case-modded into Ubuntu PC
  • Will open source still love you when I’m 64?
  • Is It Windows Or Linux Or Both?
  • An open response to Chris Frey regarding GFDL 1.3
  • So, really, where is all the disk space going?
  • Linux Newb: Day 2: Getting everything I need
  • New Firefox extension turns Amazon.com into illegal free-for-all

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Bidirectional filesystem syncing - DirSync Pro vs. Unison

  • How to change or rename user name and UID (user-id)
  • Set Operations in the Unix Shell Simplified
  • How to Set a Static IP address in Ubuntu 8.10
  • TIP: Switching Soundcards In Ubuntu
  • A Windows start alternative for Ubuntu
  • Download,Extract Audio From YouTube Videos
  • Producing an EBook Cover With POVRay and Inkscape
  • Filenames by Design, Part Three
  • Analyzing TCP Disconnects On Linux Or Unix
  • Using Network File System in Ubuntu
  • Bash Completition on Gentoo
  • The understated usefulness of SSH, part 1

KDE 4.2: Codenamed Caterpillar, Promising a Butterfly

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: If the first beta of KDE 4.2 is any indication, then the final release of the popular GNU/Linux desktop should be the release in which KDE 4 comes into its own.

The Pros and Cons of Using Joomla!

Filed under
Software

computersight.com: Joomla! is a content management system you can use to build websites faster than you ever imagined.

Slackware Approaches Stable 12.2 Release

Filed under
Slack

ostatic.com: Linux Weekly News directs readers to a Slackware Linux list post detailing the package versions and included components for the upcoming Slackware 12.2 release.

Running DOS Programs on Linux: Duke Nukem Lives!

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: If I play video games they're usually pretty low tech ones. One of the few games I miss from the old days is Duke Nukem, and I'm talking about the Duke before he went 3D. If you have an old DOS game that you'd like to run, or for that matter any old DOS program, check out DOSBox.

Asus nettop gets discrete graphics

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Asus has announced enhanced versions of its Eee Box "nettop" computer. Targeting home-theater applications, the B204 and B206 include HDMI outputs, as well as discrete graphics circuitry from ATI, and could prove popular for Linux media center distributions like Boxee, MythTV, SageTV, Linux MCE, and others.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source intelligent solutions to transform work, businesses

New trends are opening up new opportunities and new ways to deal with IT, according to Thomas di Giacomo, SUSE CTO, speaking at the SUSE executive roundtable, which the open source company hosted in partnership with ITWeb last week. There are many new and innovative technologies that can help IT leaders meet these new demands, he added. Open source based technologies have become the driving force behind most of the technologically disruptive innovations, said Di Giacomo. "It is pretty clear that all the new innovation is coming from open source. "For example, open source progress with Linux and virtualisation a couple of decades ago, cloud in the last 10 years, and more recently, containers for applications, software-defined infrastructure, and platform-as-a-service, empowering DevOps principles." However, these trends also present some new challenges, said Di Giacomo. Compared to a couple of decades ago, the number of open source projects today has skyrocketed - from hundreds in the different foundations like the Linux Foundation, Apache, Eclipse and others, to millions of projects on Github. Read more

today's lefftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Running for the board of the Open Source Initiative – a few words
    Today I would like to explain my reasons for my candidacy at the board of the Open Source Initiative. I can think of two kinds of reason for my decision: one is personal, and the other one is directly related to current state of Open Source and software freedom. Let’s start with the first one: I’m currently helping the Open Information Security Foundation and the Suricata project in my capacity at ANSSI, while contributing in a minor way to the LibreOffice project and the Document Foundation.
  • Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People
    Since then, I have heard of another email provider that you may be interested in. It’s a little different, but it touts some of the same features ProtonMail does: privacy, security, open-source code, etc. It’s called Tutanota, and like ProtonMail, I am a very big fan.
  • Open FinTech Forum – Event preview, October 10-11, New York City.
  • The tracker will always get through
    A big objection to tracking protection is the idea that the tracker will always get through. Some people suggest that as browsers give users more ability to control how their personal information gets leaked across sites, things won't get better for users, because third-party tracking will just keep up. On this view, today's easy-to-block third-party cookies will be replaced by techniques such as passive fingerprinting where it's hard to tell if the browser is succeeding at protecting the user or not, and users will be stuck in the same place they are now, or worse. I doubt this is the case because we're playing a more complex game than just trackers vs. users. The game has at least five sides, and some of the fastest-moving players with the best understanding of the game are the adfraud hackers. Right now adfraud is losing in some areas where they had been winning, and the resulting shift in adfraud is likely to shift the risks and rewards of tracking techniques.
  • MozMEAO SRE Status Report - February 16, 2018
    Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from January 23 - February 16.
  • The major milestones of the Government Digital Service (GDS)
  • PyTorch Should Be Copyleft
    Most people have heard of Google’s Tensorflow which was released at the end of 2015, but there’s an active codebase called PyTorch which is easier to understand, less of a black box, and more dynamic. Tensorflow does have solutions for some of those limitations (such as Tensorflow-fold, and Tensorflow-Eager) but these new capabilities remove the need for other features and complexity of Tensorflow. Google built a great system for doing static computation graphs before realizing that most people want dynamic graphs. Doh! [...] I wish PyTorch used the AGPL license. Most neural networks are run on servers today, it is hardly used on the Linux desktop. Data is central to AI and that can stay owned by FB and the users of course. The ImageNet dataset created a revolution in computer vision, so let’s never forget that open data sets can be useful.
  • Linux on Nintendo Switch, a new Kubernetes ML platform, and more news
    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the Mozilla's IoT gateway, a new machine learning platform, Code.mil's revamp, and more.

Security: France, Munich, 'Smart' Meters, MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime

  • Highlights of the French cybersecurity strategy

    First, the document describes that in France cyberdefence and cyberoffence are separated. This is directly opposed to the models employed in Anglo-Saxon countries. But it’s shown as an asset. Key argument: it respects freedoms and civil liberties.

    The document then lists the six general objectives of cyberdefence, namely: prevention, anticipation, protection, detection, attribution, reaction (remediation). The strategy itself is complete, it focuses on civil, military, domestic, external, and international levels. Let’s say it’s a rarity in the business in strategic cybersecurity documents.

    [...]

    The strategy then mentions that one of the solutions could be to release source code and documentation after an end of support date.

  • The Munich Security Conference 2018

    Over the past five decades, the Munich Security Conference (MSC) has become the major global forum for the discussion of security policy. Each February, it brings together more than 450 senior decision-makers from around the world, including heads-of-state, ministers, leading personalities of international and non-governmental organizations, as well as high ranking representatives of industry, media, academia, and civil society, to engage in an intensive debate on current and future security challenges.

  • Smart meters could leave British homes vulnerable to cyber attacks, experts have warned
    New smart energy meters that the Government wants to be installed in millions of homes will leave householders vulnerable to cyber attacks, ministers have been warned.
  • MeltdownPrime and SpectrePrime: Researchers nail exploits
    "The flaws—dubbed Meltdown and Spectre—are in chips made by Intel and other major suppliers. They can allow hackers to steal data from the memory of running apps, including password managers, browsers and emails." The authors of the paper on arXiv, Caroline Trippel, Daniel Lustig, and Margaret Martonosi, discuss a tool they developed for "automatically synthesizing microarchitecture-specific programs capable of producing any user-specified hardware execution pattern of interest." They said they show "how this tool can be used for generating small microarchitecture-specific programs which represent exploits in their most abstracted form—security litmus tests."