Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 20 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Upgrading libraries to open source Koha system Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 8:31am
Story Galaxy Alpha: Samsung Puts Pedal to Metal Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:57am
Story Debian Installer Images Now In Beta For 8.0 Jessie Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:51am
Story Thanks KDE Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:43am
Story 2038 Kernel Summit Discussion Fodder Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:32am
Story Fedora 21 Delayed, New User Questions, and Variety Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:16am
Story Sandwich-style ARM9 SBC ships with Linux Rianne Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 7:12am
Blog entry How to rename files in bulk chickenkinwing 14/08/2014 - 2:10am
Story Hands on: LG G3 Android smartphone Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 11:52pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 10:39pm

Breaking Down OpenSolaris on the Desktop

Filed under
OS

informit.com: A lot has been said about OpenSolaris, the community-supported version of Sun's Solaris operating system. Is it for you? Not if you're a SOHO user interested in business productivity applications, says A.Lizard.

Why does open source need a villain?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: Bill Gates has been in “retirement” for less than a month (heading his Foundation may be harder than being Microsoft CEO) and already open source advocates have settled on a replacement.

Xubuntu + BEOS theme + Remastersys = PC/OS

Filed under
Linux

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: This must have been the briefest test run a Linux distribution had on my box. I continued until the live desktop, only to confirm the massive suspicion I had. This is yet another remaster posing as something new. The culprit: PC/OS.

The New and Improved Ubuntu QA

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: For the last couple of weeks, Jordan Mantha been working behind the scenes on creating a community Ubuntu QA (quality assurance) team. For quite a while Canonical has largely driven QA efforts in Ubuntu. The community can and should step up in this area.

Acer Aspire one (Linux)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

laptopmag.com: Mini-notebooks are getting bigger and more elaborate by the day, but Acer enters the crowded market with a simple yet solid miniature laptop for only $379. The Aspire one’s easy to use, customized Linux operating system and low price make it a compelling mini-notebook.

NASA Uses Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntulinuxtipstricks.blogspot: Two weekends ago was the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Due to NASA's 50th anniversary they got one of the country spots this year. Dan walks over, looks at the photo of a woman in front of a projector, and goes "that's gnome-terminal!"

OpenBSD devs respond to Torvalds' monkey jibe

zdnet.com.au: OpenBSD developers have responded to comments made by Linus Torvalds that they are a "bunch of masturbating monkeys". In an email exchange with ZDNet.co.uk, developer Ken Westerback wrote that an interest in security should lead to fixing all bugs.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Sweet Home 3D: simple interior design

  • The Year of the Free Software Desktop
  • What version of linux seems to be the least buggiest
  • What Linux version for a newcomer to Linux?
  • Intux 1.0 A Clone of PCLinuxOS with New Graphics
  • To Break ABI or Not to Break ABI: That is the Question
  • Red Hat Offers a Model for Patent Licensing
  • The Top command
  • Is content you can edit open source?
  • Tough Love
  • Ubuntu Tweak Utility Review
  • Plasma Embedded
  • Open Source OS's Part 3: OpenSuse
  • Linux Not The Savior For Our Economy
  • NVIDIA Updates Its Legacy Linux Drivers
  • Nicaragua: Open Source Software in Public Institutions

PCLinuxOS to Mandriva Spring 2008.1

Filed under
MDV

datalude.com/blog: I posted an entry here a month or so ago about my switch from Linux Mint to PCLinuxOS. There was good, bad, and definitely very ugly. In the many comments on that article, someone suggested that I should try Mandriva. So I did.

Linus Torvalds: Short update and pause in 2.6.27 merge window

Filed under
Linux

lkml.org: This is just a quick note to let people know that I'll be off for an extended weekend starting later today, so the next few days will be very quiet from a merge standpoint.

Which platform: Cathedral or open source?

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.com.au: Have you ever experienced a software bug and thought to yourself, "I could fix that"? If you could, would you? How could that even be possible?

Don't Overcomplicate Linux!

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: This is the kind of thing I don't particularly enjoy writing, but as I have been blogging about learning Linux, and I've tried to approach as an "ordinary PC user" would, I think it's important to pass along lessons learned from mistakes.

10 Must-Have Linux Applications

Filed under
Software

Matt Hartley: What finally allowed me to go full-time with my chosen distro was not so much the progression of hardware detection and self-mounting partitions but the applications. Today, I would like to share some of my personal favorites with you.

BLAG 90000: The Che Guevara Of Linux

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: THERE'S an alluring whiff of rebellion about the Linux/Open Source community. Using Linux, writing about Linux, championing Linux - it is like sticking up two fingers (or one, if you are reading this in America) to a corporate world that insists on telling me what I can and cannot do with my own computers. Every time I use BLAG 90000, I cannot help thinking of Che Guevara.

Audio/Visual Synthesis: The New Arts, Part 2

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: In this second part of my survey I focus on the tools that achieve this new synthesis of arts. Each of these programs takes a different approach to the practical concerns of blending images (moving or still) with sound (realtime or recorded).

Auto-NDISwrapper–a tool for enabling wireless network card to work with its Windows driver on Linux

Filed under
Software

linuxine.com: I often see Linux users complain their wireless network card doesn’t work on Linux at the forums,indeed , some wireless network cards can’t work/work well on Linux. Auto-NDISwrapper would be one of the solutions for those complaints.

Open source should support Apple over Psystar

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet: Open source should be supporting Apple here. Think about it. What is at the heart of open source? Contracts. The BSD and GPL licenses are contracts.

firefox 3.0.1 and disabled add-ons

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillazine.org/asa: I've read around the blogs and twitterverse that people are seeing some of their add-ons disabled by the just-released Firefox 3.0.1 security and stability update. There's good news and bad news here.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.