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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Day 25: Personal Finances srlinuxx 26/06/2011 - 4:24pm
Story The Perfect Desktop - Fedora 15 i686 (GNOME) falko 26/06/2011 - 9:34am
Story GNOME developer quote of the day srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 11:20pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 181 is out! srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 11:18pm
Story More software freedom of choice! srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 11:16pm
Story Ubuntu is... srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 11:12pm
Blog entry Welcome to the Jungle srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 8:24pm
Story Torvalds: User-Space File-Systems, Toys, Misguided People srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 8:04pm
Story KDE Ships First 4.7 Release Candidate srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 8:03pm
Story Beacon: Sweet Little Game with Touching Story srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 6:00pm

Most popular websites 6 out of 7 powered by GNU/Linux - concludes survey

Filed under
Linux

Pingdom - an uptime monitoring company conducted a survey recently where it researched the technologies that power 7 most popular websites. All these websites except Alexaholic, exclusively use Linux as their choice of OS. Alexaholic is hosted on Windows.

Fedora Linux Leaves Its Users Behind?

Filed under
Linux

Those of you who are outside of the Linux circle of influences must have heard about Eric Raymond's rejection of Fedora. But if you ask me, the really interesting thing has been the public reaction to his comments in, well, the reader comments area of the article.

Also: The Terrible State of WiFi in Linux

beryl: usability, part 6

Filed under
HowTos

This is a quick howto on a not-so-well-known feature of beryl - drag and drop using the scale plugin.

Also: Tweak beryl for speed

So, How Does it Feel to have been Had?

Filed under
Linux

Mike Dell fires his CEO, takes control of Dell again and starts "A New Era of Innovation." He has his people put up a website asking US what we want in a Dell Computer. In no particular order, the tens of thousands of responses were:

Also: Linux and Dell - getting there?
And: Dell backs down from Linux promise

How to dual boot Linux and Windows XP (Linux installed first)

Filed under
HowTos

We're going to use the Gnome Partition Editor (Gparted) from the Ubuntu LiveCD to shrink the Ubuntu partition on the hard disk and create enough space for an installation of XP. We'll then install XP, and, because XP overwrites the master boot record, we'll restore the GRUB boot loader so that either XP or Linux can be selected at boot time.

UK government ignores open-source potential

Filed under
OSS

John Pugh MP argues that a bias against open-source within Whitehall has lead to schools and universities becoming too focused on proprietary technology.

Linux partnership addresses forking

Filed under
Linux

The deal between Linux makers Ubuntu and Linspire will help to address fragmentation of the open source operating system, according to an analyst.

Ubuntu Edgy - Bluetooth File Transfer Is Back!

Filed under
HowTos

It took some looking, but as it turns out, the issue that broke gnome-obex-send ability to send files to a mobile Bluetooth phone (such as my Cingular 8125) has a very simple fix. So, for those of you on Edgy looking to send files back and forth between your phone and PC, let’s get started.

GPLv3 to miss March deadline

Filed under
OSS

The release of the third version of the GNU Project's General Public License will be delayed by a few months. "We were supposed to release the third draft in January, and we have not yet done so," Stallman said in reply to a query. "We are almost ready."

The emerging FOSS revolution in Cuba

Filed under
OSS

Cuba is the rough diamond of the western-southern hemisphere. Intentionally neutered by almost 50 years of U.S. foreign policy, Cuba has still been able to create one of the world's highest literacy rates, provide free health care to all its citizens, and exports more doctors than any other nation. Now Cuba stands on the precipice of a revolution in the use and development of free and open source software. This will not only likely have dramatic effects on the internal politics of the nation, but also lead to Cuba's next significant export -- free and open source software.

Linux Could Prevent Use of 4,200,000,000 kg of Fossil Fuels a Year

Filed under
Linux

There's been a lot of talk in the last couple weeks about the significant negative impact that Windows Vista will have on the environment. Almost 100% of this negative impact is the waste that it will generate by making millions of machines obsolete.

Open Source: The Only Software One Really Owns

Filed under
OSS

Bill Gates once called the open source community a bunch of communists, thinking the open source ideal was against anyone owning the fruits of their programming labors. However, he has missed the real point. It's about not being held to ransom -- freedom to modify, extend and supplement your technology as you see fit.

Help Lobby Washington To Protect Open Source from Software Patents

Filed under
OSS

The House Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, the Internet, and Intellectual Property is making another attempt to reform patent law. I need your help to lobby them to add protection from software patent attacks for Open Source software and Open Standards.

Growisofs WRITE Errors

Filed under
HowTos

Growisofs is a fairly universal DVD writing program for Unix OSs these days. While we were working on an a quick article explaining a few different uses the following error message came up: WRITE@LBA=10h failed with SK=4h/ASC=08h/ACQ=03h.

Also: Creating Large (>2GB) DVD Backups Under Linux

Ubuntu "Feisty Fawn" a step closer

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu developers are finalising preparations for the release of the next version -- dubbed Feisty Fawn -- of the popular Linux distribution in mid-April.

How to use Inkscape’s new blur filter

Filed under
HowTos

The blur filter, one of the most eagerly-awaited Inkscape features, was recently introduced in Inkscape version 0.45. The blur filter opens up a wide range of photo-realistic rendering possibilities. I’ll walk you through some example applications of the blur filter so you can get a feel for what some of those possibilities are.

Trolltech Becomes the First Corporate Patron of KDE

Filed under
KDE

Trolltech, the Norwegian company behind the Qt toolkit has become the second Patron of KDE. Being a Patron of KDE is an ideal way to both support the KDE project and become a more active member of the KDE community. Of course, aside from financial matters, sponsors of KDE are a vital part of the vibrant community outreach scheme.

Linux is bad for business, bad for America, and bad for mankind

Filed under
Linux

I realized that the $3000 laptop was no longer necessary, and that all the things I wanted to do with a computer I could do with Linux on an older, cheaper machine. I wouldn’t ever buy another $3000 computer, because I know now that the hardware I kept pushing for is unnecessary.

Why Microsoft should never, ever acquire Linux

Filed under
OS

It seems that barely a month can go bye without me finding some Linux based content that I object to and it's happened again. An article on CoolTechZone.com was trying to explain Why Microsoft Should Acquire Linux and I couldn't help but think "why not turn water to wine along the way".

Edubuntu: Linux for education

Filed under
Ubuntu

Edubuntu is the Ubuntu distribution's educational variant. It provides a software platform that allows educators to spend more time teaching with computers and less time managing them. In addition to Linux and the typical productivity software, Edubuntu provides the organisational package SchoolTool and educational programs for children between preschool and high school, with three age groups within this demographic, each with their own relevant settings.

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