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Tuesday, 24 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Novell's Open Source Rex Talks Linux

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

internetnews.com: It's not all about the code in the Linux ecosystem. Any Linux project needs leadership. Markus Rex is one such leader.

Linux Mint 6: Felicia

Filed under
Linux

greentechgirl.com: I’ve been using Linux Mint instead of Ubuntu for a while, and overall I’m pleased with it. However, since upgrading from Linux Mint 5 (Elyssa) to 6 (Felicia), I’ve actually been a little less happy with it. A few irksome problems:

Fast ext4 fsck times, revisited

thunk.org/tytso/blog: Last night I managed to finish up a rather satisfying improvement to ext4’s inode and block allocators. The ext4’s original allocator was actually a bit more simple-minded than ext3’s, in that it didn’t implement the Orlov algorithm to spread out top-level directories for better filesystem aging.

Linux forensics - Part 2: Protech

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: In this article, we will talk about Protech, a high-end hacking toolbox for the enterpreneuring system administrator. It is a young, new distribution, based on Ubuntu and running an extremely streamlined, lightweight Fluxbox desktop.

CodeWeavers Updates CrossOver Games

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: If you're a gamer, you'll want to know about CodeWeavers' latest update for its popular gaming software. CrossOver Games 7.2.0 is now available for both Linux and Mac OS X, and includes a bunch of fixes, formal support for Spore, and an updated version of Wine.

Tour the Linux generic SCSI driver

Filed under
Linux

Linux provides a generic driver for SCSI devices and an application programming interface so users can build applications to send SCSI commands directly to SCSI devices. In this article, the author introduces some of the SCSI commands and methods of executing SCSI commands when using SCSI API in Linux. He also provides background on the SCSI client/server model and the storage SCSI command.

Microsoft supports punk'd open source

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: Oh sure. Microsoft loves open source. If your open source company is willing to admit Microsoft owns Linux, acknowledge the legitimacy of its proprietary standards, and put “whatever Microsoft wants.”

I hate Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

kev009.com: I hate Ubuntu. I immediately lose respect for anyone who runs it, and especially those who advocate it. Here’s why:

Also: Ubuntu Makes Cloud Strategy a Big Joke

Novell-Red Hat Conundrum: What’s a FOSS Supporter to Do?

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: When you are a free and open source software (FOSS) supporter, life often seems black and white. What you decided would say a great deal about your reasons for supporting FOSS.

You Want A Beautiful OS? Try Elive

Filed under
Linux

maketecheasier.com: What do you get when you put a stable operating system, an innovative desktop manager and plenty of eye candies together?

Is Red Hat Taking Aim at Ubuntu?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: A representative of Red Hat told a reporter recently that will indeed be pushing the Linux desktop again. Such a move would presumably present a challenge to Ubuntu, which has dominated the desktop scene for a long time. Or would it?

VMware moves vCenter to Linux

Filed under
Software

zdnet.co.ukVMware will release future versions of vCenter, its flagship virtualisation-management software, in Linux versions as well as for Windows.

Five Questions With A.J. Venter - Creator Of Kongoni Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

opensourcereleasefeed.com: Kongoni is a completely new distribution to Linux, who is behind this and please give some background on what got you to this place.

Linux dominates in Amazon Kindle competitors

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Linux runs on the first e-book reader released this year ... and on the second ... and the third.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • KDE 4.2 Lures Me Back to Kubuntu

  • Basic Linux Security for Beginners
  • Around the Distros
  • OLPC users discover free WiFi at Rwandan Airport
  • The dollar is tight, where does that leave open source?
  • What is an “Open Source Company?” The Billion Dollar Question
  • Microsoft suit over FAT patents could open OSS Pandora's Box
  • Open Source, Open Standards and Re-Use: UK Government Policy
  • The Losing Battle Against Technology Freedom
  • HackerPublicRadio - NewsCast Ep0
  • Red Hat upgrades its mission
  • Kernel 2.6.28 Notes and Upgrade to Ext4
  • Moore's Law and open source
  • This is not Gnome
  • Howto create CentOS Xen VM under Ubuntu Dom0
  • Superuser Privilege Management: It's Not About Trust
  • 10 things to tell your kids when you've ditched windows for linux
  • MySQL forks: Monty splits from Sun
  • The Phoronix Test Suite Gets A GUI
  • What you should do before, during & after an Ubuntu install
  • A Third of Dell Inspiron Mini 9 Netbooks Comes with Ubuntu
  • Installing LXDE, LightWeight X11 Desktop Environment on openSUSE 11.1
  • Install Software from the Command Line in openSUSE

My Impressions of KDE 4.2

Filed under
KDE

jintoreedwine.wordpress: I have been using KDE 4.2 on both my Gentoo systems (laptop and desktop) since about a week after it was released. I still run it now and plan on running it until the next big release of KDE.

Distro Review: Sabayon 4.0

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org/blog: Today’s candidate is the latest release of a distro I first looked at some time ago, Sabayon. I’ve had mixed feelings about it in the past. I wanted to see how it had developed now they’d reached version 4.0, so here goes nothing…

Is Gentoo dying or just becoming old?

Filed under
Gentoo

mindstab.net: I haven't really touched my Gentoo desktop in over a year. If I wanted to stay with Gentoo, I'd have a day or two of compiling a head of me, and then who knows what integration head aches as programs and config files change.

Subtle Improvements In Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Due out tomorrow is the fifth alpha release for Ubuntu 9.04 (the Jaunty Jackalope). Ubuntu 9.04 is now in a feature freeze so there isn't much to expect in Jaunty Alpha 5, but there are a few items worth highlighting.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: Video Conferences, Code.gov, and LibreOffice

  • How to video conference without people hating you
    What about an integrated headset and microphone? This totally depends on the type. I tend to prefer the full sound of a real microphone but the boom mics on some of these headsets are quite good. If you have awesome heaphones already you can add a modmic to turn them into headsets. I find that even the most budget dedicated headsets sound better than earbud microphones.
  • Learn about the open source efforts of Code.gov at this event
    The U.S. government has a department looking to spread open source projects, and members will be in Baltimore this week. Code.gov is looking to promote reuse of open source code within the government to cut down on duplicating development work, and spread use of the code throughout the country. On April 26 event at Spark Baltimore, team members from Code.gov, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Presidential Innovation Fellowship are among those invited to be at a meetup to share more. Held from 12-3 p.m., the event will feature talks from the invited guests about what they’re working on and Federal Source Code Policy, as well as how it can apply locally, said organizing team member Melanie Shimano.
  • LibreOffice Conference 2018 Takes Place in Tirana, Albania, for LibreOffice 6.1
    While working on the next major LibreOffice release, The Document Foundation is also prepping for this year's LibreOffice Conference, which will take place this fall in Albania. The LibreOffice Conference is the perfect opportunity for new and existing LibreOffice developers, users, supporters, and translators, as well as members of the Open Source community to meet up, share their knowledge, and plan the new features of the next major LibreOffice release, in this case LibreOffice 6.1, due in mid August 2018. A call for papers was announced over the weekend as The Document Foundation wants you to submit proposals for topics and tracks, along with a short description of yourself for the upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2018 event, which should be filed no later than June 30, 2018. More details can be found here.
  • LibreOffice Conference Call for Paper
    The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops for this year’s conference in Tirana (Albania). The event is scheduled for late September, from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice or the Document Liberation Project, we want to hear from you!

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more