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Tuesday, 25 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Vector Linux 5.9 Standard: What Slack should be.

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: I've been impressed with Vector Linux in the past, though strangely moreso with their free version than the paid edition. They've generally offered a nice low-power alternative for older boxes and those of us with newer boxes who just like efficiency. I was interested to see what (if anything) had changed since the last time I looked at it.

Everex To Offer CloudBook Ultra-Mobile PC at Walmart

dailytech.com: Look out Windows Vista and hot-selling Mac OS X Leopard -- a new OS is in town. A new Linux distribution, gOS, produced by Good OS LLC and based on a Ubuntu 7.10 version, hit the market yesterday when it was announced at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.

colordiff: put some color in your diffs

Filed under
Software

DPotD: colordiff is a small tool to colorize diff output which greatly improves readability. colordiff can be used as a wrapper around diff, a tool used to compare files line by line.

SplashTop Running On Prototype ASUS Notebook

phoronix: DeviceVM's SplashTop, a product we had named as one of the greatest Linux innovations in 2007, is sharing a booth this week at the Consumer Electronic Show (CES) with ASUS. At their booth we were allowed to check out a SplashTop demo running on an ASUS notebook!

OLPC XO-1

Filed under
OLPC

bunniestudios.com: I got an OLPC XO-1 a few days ago in the mail as part of the give one, get one program. Hopefully some child out there is enjoying their new laptop–there’s a certain amount of opacity in the process so I have no idea even if this laptop went to some needy far-flung village in a developing nation, as most of the propaganda would have you believe.

Kernel space: kerneloops, read-mostly, and I/O port 80

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: New kernel changes will help organize bug reports, use cache more efficiently, and prevent crashes on some x86-64 systems.

CES: Hands On With OpenMoko Linux Handset

informationweek.com/blog: Today at CES I was able to spend a few moments playing with the OpenMoko Neo FreeRunner mobile phone. It was not fully functional, but the features that did work on this open source Linux phone looked really great. Read on for more first impressions.

How to Check the Health of a Unix/Linux Server

Filed under
HowTos

eWeek: Everybody knows that regular automobile maintenance improves a car's reliability, improves mileage and extends the life of the vehicle. Neal Nelson, president of Neal Nelson & Associates explains that the same is true of computer systems.

Negroponte turns up the heat on Intel

Filed under
OLPC

zdnet.com.au: Intel has denied claims made by One Laptop per Child that it broke a "non-disparagement" agreement and hit back at suggestions that it did not even contribute "a single line of code" to the project.

zomg! beyond the red line

Filed under
Gaming

kmandla.wordpress: I got a little carried away the other day, and installed the Beyond the Red Line demo, and I’m really enjoying it. The game is tough, but it’s very addictive.

Picasa 2.7 a slick upgrade on Linux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Google has released a public beta of its Picasa photo organizer for Linux. The new release adds some important features for image browsing, image searching, and creative image export. If you haven't tried it before, now is the time.

It's a Matter of Choice

Filed under
Ubuntu

jon-reagan.blogspot: When I run Ubuntu, I get an easy-to-use interface with a nice brown theme (yup, I like the theme) and a huge amount of applications available at my fingertips. Ubuntu's also fast, stable, and doesn't give me much trouble when I want it to do something that requires large amounts of RAM.

howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • Working Productively in Bash’s Vi Command Line Editing Mode

  • python user define sorting with callback
  • Theming Firefox 2 For GTK-Like Tabs
  • bash and time calculation
  • Installing IE6 on Ubuntu Gutsy (7.10)
  • Avoid Detection with nmap Port Scan Decoys
  • How to keep your keyboard layout with HAL 0.5.10 / Xorg server 1.4 / evdev input driver
  • keymap mess up on gentoo
  • Rescue Mode
  • My Linux froze and I am hot under the collar
  • Make OS2008 for N800/N810 Look Beautiful
  • Safely Remove Old Linux Kernel from a Linux Server

The Linux Project: Gentoo revisited

Filed under
Gentoo

opednews.com: Once upon a time, I wrote a series of articles about the various Linux distributions that exist on the Internet. At that time, I had tried, and condemned a distribution known as Gentoo. While Gentoo remains perhaps the most difficult operating system I have ever installed on a computer, once it gets installed, it works quite nicely.

Old-school SUSE executives take over Open-Xchange

linux-watch: Open-Xchange, a German open-source groupware company with long ties to SUSE Linux, is changing its top management team.

Open source and the Long Tail: An interview with Chris Anderson

Filed under
Interviews

Matt Asay: Recently I was fortunate to interview Chris Anderson, editor-in-Chief of Wired and the keynote speaker for the Open Source Think Tank, coming up on February 7-9, 2008, in Napa Valley, California. Given Chris' views, I think he's an ideal person to headline an event whose theme is "The Future of Commercial Open Source."

The Hidden Costs of Linux Ownership

Filed under
Linux

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes: Linux might be free to download and install, and it might offer you freedoms that aren’t available from commercial software, but don’t let that fool you into thinking that everything about Linux is free. You might save money, but there are still hidden costs that need to be taken into account.

Trolltech switches sides in mobile Linux war

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk: The open-source development company Trolltech has switched sides in the ongoing war between the various mobile Linux consortia.

New Intel ultra-mobile PCs feature Linux

Filed under
Linux

IDG News Service: Intel is displaying four new ultra-mobile PCs designed around its Menlow chips at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), including highly anticipated devices from Lenovo and Toshiba.

11 open-source projects certified as secure

Filed under
OSS

news.com: Coverity, which creates automated source-code analysis tools, announced late Monday its first list of open-source projects that have been certified as free of security defects. Eleven projects made the list: Amanda, NTP, OpenPAM, OpenVPN, Overdose, Perl, PHP, Postfix, Python, Samba, and TCL.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Financial News

  • Red Hat announces latest version of Ansible
  • Red Hat On An Expansion Spree In India
    Red Hat is aggressively expanding its operations in India. The company recently announced the opening of two new offices in Bangalore and New Delhi. With the opening of the new offices, Red Hat is expanding its footprint in India with a goal of supporting interest for open source solutions and services from customers and partners and further promoting the benefits open source solutions can offer enterprises in India. Red Hat now has six offices in India, including additional facilities in Bangalore and New Delhi, and offices in Mumbai and Pune. Red Hat’s new Bangalore office is a 14,000 sq. ft. facility at Lavelle Road. It is designed to act as a training and enablement center for customers and partners. Through the new facility, which features a cafeteria, and space for networking, meetings, training and certification exams, and an indoor game zone, Red Hat aims to bring its open, collaborative culture to life. The additional New Delhi office is a 12,405 sq.ft facility located close to the international airport at Aerocity, designed with an eye toward enabling collaboration with customers throughout the region.
  • Somewhat Positive Press Coverage Very Likely to Affect Red Hat (RHT) Stock Price
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Releases Q1 Earnings Guidance

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Recursive DNS Server Fingerprint Problem

    Our goal is to identify hijacked resolvers by analyzing their fingerprints, in order to increase safety of Internet users. To do that, we utilize data collected via RIPE Atlas (atlas.ripe.net).

  • Online developer tutorials are spreading XSS and SQL injection flaws

    The researchers, from across three universities in Germany and Trend Micro, checked the PHP code bases of more than 64,000 projects on Github and uncovered more than 100 vulnerabilities that they believe might have been introduced as a result of developers picking up the code that they used from online tutorials.

  • BrickerBot, the permanent denial-of-service botnet, is back with a vengeance

    BrickerBot, the botnet that permanently incapacitates poorly secured Internet of Things devices before they can be conscripted into Internet-crippling denial-of-service armies, is back with a new squadron of foot soldiers armed with a meaner arsenal of weapons.

  • Reproducible Builds: week 104 in Stretch cycle
  • Webroot antivirus goes bananas, starts trashing Windows system files
    Webroot's security tools went berserk today, mislabeling key Microsoft Windows system files as malicious and temporarily removing them – knackering PCs in the process. Not only were people's individual copies of the antivirus suite going haywire, but also business editions and installations run by managed service providers (MSPs), meaning companies and organizations relying on the software were hit by the cockup. Between 1200 and 1500 MST (1800 and 2100 UTC) today, Webroot's gear labeled Windows operating system data as W32.Trojan.Gen – generic-Trojan-infected files, in other words – and moved them into quarantine, rendering affected computers unstable. Files digitally signed by Microsoft were whisked away – but, luckily, not all of them, leaving enough of the OS behind to reboot and restore the quarantined resources.
  • How The Update Framework Improves Security of Software Updates
    Updating software is one of the most important ways to keep users and organizations secure. But how can software be updated securely? That's the challenge that The Update Framework (TUF) aims to solve. Justin Cappos, assistant professor at New York University, detailed how TUF works and what's coming to further improve the secure updating approach in a session at last week's DockerCon 17 conference in Austin, Texas. Simply using HTTPS and Transport Layer Security (TLS) to secure a download isn't enough as there have been many publicly reported instances of software repositories that have been tampered with, Cappos said.
  • Security Updates for Ubuntu Phone to End in June
    Security updates for Ubuntu phone and tablet will end this June, Canonical has confirmed. Current OTA updates are currently limited to critical fixes and security updates — a decision we were first to tell you back in January. But after June 2017 Canonical “will no longer deliver any further updates”.
  • Canonical to stop supporting Ubuntu Phone in June
    Canonical had already announced development of its Ubuntu Phone software was ending. Now we know when the final nail goes in the coffin: June.
  • Malware Hunts And Kills Poorly Secured Internet Of Things Devices Before They Can Be Integrated Into Botnets
    Researchers say they've discovered a new wave of malware with one purpose: to disable poorly secured routers and internet of things devices before they can be compromised and integrated into botnets. We've often noted how internet-of-broken-things devices ("smart" doorbells, fridges, video cameras, etc.) have such flimsy security that they're often hacked and integrated into botnets in just a matter of seconds after being connected to the internet. These devices are then quickly integrated into botnets that have been responsible for some of the worst DDoS attacks we've ever seen (including last October's attack on DYN).

GNOME/GTK News

  • The Way GNOME Handles Wallpapers Really Annoys Me
    I love GNOME Shell — and no, not just because I’ve little choice now that is Ubuntu’s default desktop! But the more I use GNOME the more I learn that the desktop environment, like every other, has its own share of quirks, bugs and inconsistencies. Like the following appreciably niche niggle in the the way GNOME handles desktop wallpapers.
  • Drag-and-drop in lists
    I’ve recently had an occasion to implement reordering of a GtkListBox via drag-and-drop (DND). It was not that complicated. Since I haven’t seen drag-and-drop used much with list boxes, here is a quick summary of what is needed to get the basics working.

Containers News

  • How Kubernetes is making contributing easy
    As the program manager of the Kubernetes community at Google, Sarah Novotny has years of experience in open source communities including MySQL and NGINX. Sarah sat down with me at CloudNativeCon in Berlin at the end of March to discuss both the Kubernetes community and open source communities more broadly. Among the topics we covered in the podcast were the challenges inherent in shifting from a company-led project to a community-led one, principles that can lead to more successful communities, and how to structure decision-making.
  • How Microsoft helped Docker with LinuxKit and Moby Project [Ed: Microsoft 'helped'... embrace, extend, coerce; haven't Docker employees learned from history?]
    Today, supporting Linux is as critical to Microsoft as it is to Red Hat and SUSE.
  • How to make branding decisions in an open community
    On April 18, Docker founder Solomon Hykes made a big announcement via a pull request in the main Docker repo: "Docker is transitioning all of its open source collaborations to the Moby project going forward." The docker/docker repo now redirects to moby/moby, and Solomon's pull request updates the README and logo for the project to match. Reaction from the Docker community has been overwhelmingly negative. As of this writing, the Moby pull request has garnered 7 upvotes and 110 downvotes on GitHub. The Docker community is understandably frustrated by this opaque announcement of a fait accompli, an important decision that a hidden inner circle made behind closed doors. It's a textbook case of "Why wasn't I consulted?"