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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ​Free software GNU/Linux laptop in development Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 10:51am
Story Nebula Builds on Cosmos for Enterprise OpenStack Deployments Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 10:49am
Story Red Hat CEO Whitehurst Talks OpenStack, Containers Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 10:38am
Story Red Hat, Red Hat, and More Red Hat Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 10:06am
Story PostgreSQL 9.4 Increases Flexibility, Scalability and Performance Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 10:02am
Story Linux & FOSS Predictions for 2015 Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 9:50am
Story digiKam Software Collection 4.6.0 released... Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 9:45am
Story What Does It Mean for Your Computer to Be Loyal? Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 9:10am
Story LG's webOS 2.0 TVs are coming to CES Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 9:02am
Story GTK 3.14, Nautilus 3.14 Land In Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet [Quick Update] Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2014 - 8:45am

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How KDE 4 is blocking Qt 4.5

  • FFmpeg Picks Up Support For New Formats
  • Fedora 11 release schedule set
  • Epic Troll
  • Linux Basement Episode 32 - Python Extravaganza
  • Fedora Classroom: KDE4 for KDE3 users
  • PCLinuxOS on the Dell Inspiron 1526
  • Want Your Friend to Switch?
  • RandR 1.2 Coming To NVIDIA's Binary Driver
  • gOS Cloud instant-on OS shown on video
  • Learn and Use a Good, Free OS: Linux - PCLinuxOS
  • Password stealing malware masquerades as Firefox add-on
  • Linux comparison: Introduction and Ubuntu
  • Linux Comparison: openSUSE
  • The FLOSS License Drafter's Responsibility to the Community
  • Sanyo using Drupal
  • Linus Torvalds: Debugging hell
  • Super Mario Firefox!
  • Actuate's Open Source Survey Says...
  • Moving to Linux — slowly
  • Fancy Up Your KDE or GNOME With Eye Candy
  • The reality of being Root
  • Is China an open source friend or foe?
  • More Linux File Systems

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Working with multimedia files - Part 2

  • Dynamic Theming in Drupal 6 - Part 1
  • Ubuntu: Try KDE 4.2 Now
  • OpenOffice, JDBC and MySQL
  • UsplashSmooth : Time Based Usplash for smoother bootup bar
  • How to customise the Acer Aspire One GUI
  • BPF for IP or VLAN Traffic
  • Password Protect Your GRUB Bootloader
  • Installing Ruby on Rails in Linux
  • Enabling Automatic Login on Ubuntu
  • Compiz on openSUSE 11.1
  • Acer 5315 AR242x wireless
  • Tips For Documentation Writers

The 2008 Ovatio Awards, by Ars Technica: Distro(s) of the Year

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica.com: The Linux distro landscape is always evolving, and virtually all of the mainstream distros have made significant progress this year. After careful consideration, we decided to give the Ovatio for Distro of the Year to two distributions that we think are particularly deserving.

Novell’s Financial Results: SUSE Linux And Three Other Facts

Filed under
SUSE
  • Novell’s Financial Results: SUSE Linux And Three Other Facts

  • ARSes crush Novell profits
  • Novell grooms NetWare-Linux lovechild

Peek at Opera 10 Alpha

Filed under
Software
  • Peek at Opera 10 Alpha

  • Opera 10 alpha: Compliant and faster--but not fastest
  • Opera 10.0 alpha 1 is impressive, but does it stand a chance against Firefox?
  • Sneak Peek: Opera 10 Browser

PCLinuxOS 2009 Beta 2 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

The second public beta release of PCLinuxOS 2009 is out and ready for testing: "The Ripper Gang is pleased to announce the second public beta ISO release of what will ultimately become PCLinuxOS 2009. This beta features Linux kernel 2.6.26.8, KDE 3.5.10, OpenOffice.org 2.4.1, Firefox 3.0.4, Thunderbird 2.0.0.17, Frostwire, KTorrent, Amarok, Flash, Java JRE, Compiz Fusion 3D and much more.

Will a Linux Certification Help You Get a Linux Job?

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Will a Linux certification help you get a Linux job? The answer is: "Probably." There are a host of Linux certifications. Each are meant to show that those who have them are Linux professionals of one level or another. How much help are they though when it comes from turning your Linux expertise into a Linux job?

Go-OO: The best office suite you never knew you used

Filed under
Software
OOo

linux.com: If you run Ubuntu, openSUSE, Debian, or Mandriva, among other distributions, then whenever you run OpenOffice.org you don't run the "official" version, but rather Go-OO, an office suite based on the OpenOffice.org source code.

Python 3.0 appears, strangles 2.x compatibility

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: Python 3.0 is out now. The latest version makes some major changes to the popular programming language, and it's incompatible with version 2.x releases.

Open Source and Free Puppies

Filed under
OSS

buytaert.net: Seth Gottlieb reported that Annie Weinberger of Interwoven, a proprietary CMS vendor, launched some good old Open Source FUD comparing Open Source to a free puppy. Puppy analogies -- especially those with free puppies -- are powerful stuff.

The Mozilla Community Store is here!

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

blog.mozilla.com: This morning we announced the launch of the Mozilla Community Store, a new open source approach to our t-shirt creation process that allows anyone to submit their original designs and make them publicly available for purchase.

Hands-on: OpenSolaris 2008.11 a major step forward for Sun

Filed under
OS

arstechnica.com: The OpenSolaris development community launched version 2008.11, its second release ever, Wednesday. It's still not capable of replacing Linux on the desktop, but it shows promise.

Fedora 10: A Mini Review

Filed under
Linux

bobbo.me.uk: I have used Ubuntu exclusively for almost 2 years now. In that time I have very rarely had contact with other distros. But with the release of both Fedora 10 and VMWare 6.5, what better time is there to check out the latest release from the Fedora team?

The five stages of community open source engagement

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: I wrote recently that the “five ages of vendor-led open source revenue strategies” I’d come up with wasn’t suitable for vendors that build a business around community-led projects.

Damn Small Linux 4.4.10 review

Filed under
Linux

itreviews.co.uk: As part of a survival toolkit, Damn Small Linux could be something of a saviour. Earlier this year, this writer used a previous release of the distribution to excise a couple of gigabytes of files from an otherwise-locked-down Vista installation.

Open source is dying -- or maybe it isn't

Filed under
OSS

Bill Snyder: Put three geeks in a room and it won't take long to start an argument. Well, analyst Dennis Byron, veteran open-source exec Stuart Cohen, and ex-Microsoft developer Keith Curtis weren't exactly in the same room, but all three have provocative opinions about the future of software in general and of open source in particular.

10 common mistakes made by Linux users

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: There are a few ubiquitous mistakes which a lot of Linux admins make while administering a Linux box. If kept in mind, these mistakes can be avoided to keep a smooth work flow.

The LXF Benchmark: Desktop environments

Filed under
Software

linuxformat.co.uk: Which Linux/Unix desktop environment will make you work and play faster? Marco Fioretti gets benchmarking to find out what's leading the pack, and what needs to go on a diet. On the scales: Gnome, KDE and Xfce, along with their file managers, terminals and text editors...

Open source does not need new buzzwords

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: At Springsource’s winter getaway this week, Forrester Research vice president John Rymer coined a clever new term to make the open source argument.

Quickly share your screenshots with JShot

Filed under
Software

linux.com: With the JShot screen capture and uploader utility, you can quickly put all or part of your screen on the Web and send a URL to it to a friend. JShot is free for noncommercial use, and is great when you want to show people a screen capture and don't want to have to deal with file names and upload permissions.

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More in Tux Machines

NuTyX 10.1-rc1 Available

I'm very please to propose you the first release candidate version of the next version 10.1 stable version of NuTyX As they have been so many security issues, I took the chance to recompile all the collections (1701 packages) for this coming next stable NuTyX version. Read more

Android Leftovers

Events: FOSDEM Samba Talks, USENIX Enigma, LCA (linux.conf.au) and FAST18

  • Authentication and authorization in Samba 4
    Volker Lendecke is one of the first contributors to Samba, having submitted his first patches in 1994. In addition to developing other important file-sharing tools, he's heavily involved in development of the winbind service, which is implemented in winbindd. Although the core Active Directory (AD) domain controller (DC) code was written by his colleague Stefan Metzmacher, winbind is a crucial component of Samba's AD functionality. In his information-packed talk at FOSDEM 2018, Lendecke said he aimed to give a high-level overview of what AD and Samba authentication is, and in particular the communication pathways and trust relationships between the parts of Samba that authenticate a Samba user in an AD environment.
  • Two FOSDEM talks on Samba 4
    Much as some of us would love never to have to deal with Windows, it exists. It wants to authenticate its users and share resources like files and printers over the network. Although many enterprises use Microsoft tools to do this, there is a free alternative, in the form of Samba. While Samba 3 has been happily providing authentication along with file and print sharing to Windows clients for many years, the Microsoft world has been slowly moving toward Active Directory (AD). Meanwhile, Samba 4, which adds a free reimplementation of AD on Linux, has been increasingly ready for deployment. Three short talks at FOSDEM 2018 provided three different views of Samba 4, also known as Samba-AD, and left behind a pretty clear picture that Samba 4 is truly ready for use. I will cover the first two talks in this article, and the third in a later one.
  • A report from the Enigma conference
    The 2018 USENIX Enigma conference was held for the third time in January. Among many interesting talks, three presentations dealing with human security behaviors stood out. This article covers the key messages of these talks, namely the finding that humans are social in their security behaviors: their decision to adopt a good security practice is hardly ever an isolated decision. Security conferences tend to be dominated by security researchers demonstrating their latest exploits. The talks are attack-oriented, they keep a narrow focus, and usually they close with a dark outlook. The security industry has been doing security conferences like this for twenty years and seems to prefer this format. Yet, if you are tired of this style, the annual USENIX Enigma conference is a welcome change of pace. Most of the talks are defense-oriented, they have a horizon going far beyond technology alone, and they are generally focused on successful solutions.
  • DIY biology
    A scientist with a rather unusual name, Meow-Ludo Meow-Meow, gave a talk at linux.conf.au 2018 about the current trends in "do it yourself" (DIY) biology or "biohacking". He is perhaps most famous for being prosecuted for implanting an Opal card RFID chip into his hand; the Opal card is used for public transportation fares in Sydney. He gave more details about his implant as well as describing some other biohacking projects in an engaging presentation. Meow-Meow is a politician with the Australian Science Party, he said by way of introduction; he has run in the last two elections. He founded BioFoundry, which is "Australia's first open-access molecular biology lab"; there are now two such labs in the country. He is also speaks frequently as "an emerging technology evangelist" for biology as well as other topics.
  • Notes from FAST18

    I attended the technical sessions of Usenix's File And Storage Technology conference this week. Below the fold, notes on the papers that caught my attention.

Security: Vista10 and uTorrent Holes Found by Google

  • Google drops new Edge zero-day as Microsoft misses 90-day deadline

    Google originally shared details of the flaw with Microsoft on 17 November 2017, but Microsoft wasn’t able to come up with a patch within Google’s non-negotiable “you have 90 days to do this” period.

  • Google Goes Public with Another Major Windows 10 Bug
    After revealing an Edge browser vulnerability that Microsoft failed to fix, Google is now back with another disclosure, this time aimed at Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (version 1709), but potentially affecting other Windows versions as well. James Forshaw, a security researcher that’s part of Google’s Project Zero program, says the elevation of privilege vulnerability can be exploited because of the way the operating system handles calls to Advanced Local Procedure Call (ALPC). This means a standard user could obtain administrator privileges on a Windows 10 computer, which in the case of an attack, could eventually lead to full control over the impacted system. But as Neowin noted, this is the second bug discovered in the same function, and both of them, labeled as 1427 and 1428, were reported to Microsoft on November 10, 2017. Microsoft said it fixed them with the release of the February 2018 Patch Tuesday updates, yet as it turns out, only issue 1427 was addressed.
  • uTorrent bugs let websites control your computer and steal your downloads

    The vulnerabilities, according to Project Zero, make it possible for any website a user visits to control key functions in both the uTorrent desktop app for Windows and in uTorrent Web, an alternative to desktop BitTorrent apps that uses a web interface and is controlled by a browser. The biggest threat is posed by malicious sites that could exploit the flaw to download malicious code into the Windows startup folder, where it will be automatically run the next time the computer boots up. Any site a user visits can also access downloaded files and browse download histories.

  • BitTorrent Client uTorrent Suffers Security Vulnerability (Updated)

    BitTorrent client uTorrent is suffering from an as yet undisclosed vulnerability. The security flaw was discovered by Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who previously said he would reveal a series of "remote code execution flaws" in torrent clients. BitTorrent Inc. has rolled out a 'patch' in the latest Beta release and hopes to fix the stable uTorrent client later this week.