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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Open source events grow at the university Roy Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 4:23pm
Story Benchmarking CompuLab's Small, Low-Power Linux PCs Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 11:51am
Story Richard Stallman on How He Started GNU Roy Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 10:15am
Story Team Tiny Core is pleased to announce the release of Core v5.2 Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 9:46am
Story Call for votes on default Linux init system for jessie Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 9:38am
Story Site Migration Imminent (Updatex6) Roy Schestowitz 5 27/01/2014 - 9:36am
Story Samsung, Google sign patent deal Rianne Schestowitz 27/01/2014 - 9:21am
Story Steam Machines 'a big step forward for strategy in the living room' Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2014 - 11:08pm
Story IBM Shows That Collaborations With the NSA Are a Company’s Death Knell Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2014 - 10:25pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2014 - 8:01pm

SE Linux--a great open source success story

Filed under
Linux

opensource.org: I just read an excellent summary of the top 10 SE Linux stories of 2007, and it reminds me that I owe the world a blog posting about the amazing vision and accomplishments of the SE Linux project.

Interview: Michael Meeuwisse

Filed under
Interviews

kernelTRAP: Michael Meeuwisse started Project VGA in September of 2007. The project aims to develop a simple, low budget, open source, VGA compatible video card available this year. In this interview, Michael explains his inspiration for the project and talks about the first development cards that will be functional by the end of the month.

Open source on the big screen: Matt Ebb tells tales of Elephants Dream

Filed under
Interviews

computerworld.com.au: Lead artist from Elephants Dream speaks about what it is like to make your own open movie using open source tools and the power of the community.

PCLOS Day 9 - Wrapping up the Control Center

Filed under
PCLOS

ruminations: I am enjoying these days with the control center, but it’s time to wrap it up and move on. There are plenty of other things that need attention.

Novell's One Big Thing

Filed under
SUSE

Glyn Moody: We have found our hedgehog concept. It is enterprise Linux and enterprise management as the two key areas required to bring together the open source world and the world of proprietary software.

Gentoo 2007.1 Cancelled, Foundation & Newsletter discussed

Filed under
Gentoo

This morning Christina Fullam states that it was decided just before Christmas to cancel the 2007.1 release and roll all the effort into Gentoo 2008.0 since there was little possibility of getting a well-tested 2007.1 release out before 2008. In other posts the status of Gentoo Foundation and the weekly newsletter were discussed.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Open season on OSes

  • How to Disable Internet Access on Linux
  • linux.conf.au: Look Tux, no wires
  • PC to PS3/Linux game streaming launches
  • Ulteo Watch: It's alive!
  • KDE 4 Installation Guide for Gentoo
  • Set up a basic web cache with Squid
  • Video: Alan Cox on community and the enterprise.
  • Hands on with the XO Sugar OS
  • Linux: Further Oops Insights
  • MODx: A promising open source CMS

How low can you go and still run Linux?

Filed under
Hardware

desktoplinux.com: I remember when getting a decent PC would set you back at least a grand. Then it was $500. Now, it's $150!? That's the story that small vendor LinFX wants you to buy along with its PC with pre-installed Linux.

opensuse.org hardware failure

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse-announce (Adrian Schröter): I am sorry to inform you that we have currently a bigger hardware failure of the raid system, which provides the content of ftp.opensuse.org and stage.opensuse.org.

Microsoft's OOXML: The No vote

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.com.au: In this first part of a two-series story, Computerworld presents a summary of the key discussion points made by industry players who do not support the bid to standardize Microsoft's OOXML format.

Hey Dell…Wanna sell some Classmates?

education.zdnet.com: Now that OLPC plans to distribute OLPC XOs in the States through OLPC America, I sent Agnes Kwan, Intel spokeswoman, an email asking if Intel planned to compete in this market with their Classmate PC.

Hans Reiser Murder Trial Resumes After Three-Week Recess

Filed under
Reiser

wired blogs: The Hans Reiser murder trial resumed here Monday after a three-week holiday recess. On the stand throughout the entire morning was Oakland Police Department technician Bruce Christensen.

The Technical-Critique of gNewSense

Filed under
Linux

lispmachine.wordpress: I am posting a Critique of gNewSense from technical viewpoint. I am strictly in agreement with RMS on the concept of Free/OpenSource Software. I was happy when after a long time, finally, a 100% Libre distro named gNewSense was released.

Rebuttal to "Sweet Follows Sour"

Filed under
KDE

nowwhatthe.blogspot: I think it's really necessary to respond to some criticism seen on the reactions to the latest OSnews article. From an user's perspective, it makes sense to only review 3 or 4 parts of KDE 4 and complain about them, and ignore all the other brilliant pieces of work in there, right?

Speeding Up Fsck With Metaclustering

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "This patch speeds up e2fsck on Ext3 significantly using a technique called Metaclustering," stated Abhishek Rai. "This patch will help reduce full fsck time for ext3. I've seen 50-65% reduction in fsck time when using this patch on a near-full file system. With some fsck optimizations, this figure becomes 80%."

Does Open Source Matter?

Filed under
OSS

sys-con.com: There’s a great deal of interest in open source software development these days. But isn’t “open source” just a fad – the latest hype in an industry that has shown a singular propensity for falling head over heels for the newest thing?

Also: Is open source recession proof?

Ubuntu releases ten lessons for the desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic: In the latest Ubuntu weekly newsletter the Ubuntu folks announced the release of the Ubuntu 7.10 Desktop Course. The modular course should take two days to complete all 10 of the lessons offered.

Which OS is more User Friendly and Intuitive?

Filed under
OS

terminally-incoherent: The widely accepted majority opinion about operating systems is that for some unspeakable reason Windows is the pinnacle and a shining beacon of usability.

KDE 4 revises the desktop

Filed under
KDE

linux.com: Behind the scenes, KDE 4 has employed new applications for interacting with hardware and multimedia, switched to the Qt4 widget set, and rewritten large sections of the core libraries. The combination makes for a noticeably faster desktop, even on a live CD -- one that rivals Xfce, the previous leader in speed among the major desktops.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Learn to use a serial console on Linux

  • HowTo: Install VMWare Workstation on Fedora 8
  • XFS Filesystem performance tweaking on Linux
  • Configure Pinnacle PCTV Card
  • Double your broadband speed for free
  • Linux sudo tip : Creating a new super user with admin rights in Linux
  • Five Steps to Install KDE 4.0 in Ubuntu 7.10
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More in Tux Machines

Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today. And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking? Read more

A switch to Android and 50 Essential Android Apps

  • Good Game: A switch to Android not as difficult as anticipated
    It’s not quite like learning a new language or how to ride a bike, but at times it does feel a little bit like both. After nearly 10 years of faithful Apple consumption — listening to iTunes, watching an Apple TV, reading iBooks — I did something completely unexpected this month: I made the leap from the neatly walled garden of Apple’s smartphone, smart watch and tablet and into the wilds of the loosely controlled world of Android gadgets. I could blame the change on a variety of must-need wearable, quasi-smart doodads, or virtual reality, or even an edge-to-edge screened smartphone that looks like you’re carrying a piece of the sky around in your pocket. But the real culprit for my leap of consumer faith isn’t one single Samsung product; it was an ecosystem of them.
  • The 50 Essential Android Apps (2017)

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.