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Friday, 17 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Interesting Improvements In GNOME 2.24

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this year prior to the release of GNOME 2.22 we had shared eight interesting improvements in GNOME 2.22. Now with the official GNOME 2.24 release due out next month, this time around we're sharing a few of the interesting highlights for this GNOME update.

Pixar's rendering software - big on Linux servers, not Mac

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: A reader of my recent story on Pixar announcing that its popular RenderMan Pro Server software would start to support Windows clusters questioned why I hadn't noted whether or not RenderMan already ran on Mac and Linux server clusters, known as 'render farms' in the animation biz.

Dell's Latitude-On instant OS detailed, screenshooted

Filed under
Linux

engadget.com: Seems the act of waking a sleeping laptop to a full-blown OS is no longer in vogue. We're not sure when this happened though we're pretty sure that ASUS' decision to embed SplashTop into its P5E3 mobo had something to do with it. The benefit, of course, is an extension of battery life to days instead of hours.

Test Driving Zenwalk 5.2 Beta Gnome Edition

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: This was my first ever adventure with a Slakware-based GNU/Linux distribution so I cannot say it has been an easy, effortless task, but that's probably just my lack of experience, because, after I finished the installation and testing of Zenwalk 5.2 Beta Gnome edition, it all made much more sense.

gOS 3 Gadgets (beta) targets Linux beginners and Google Gadgets lovers

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: I first heard of gOS when it was chosen to power the $199 Wal-Mart gPC. The third iteration of the OS, gOS 3.0 "Gadgets" Beta, was released last week. It's a great Web-focused desktop, but it doesn't offer much to experienced or current Ubuntu users.

Also: A video tour of gOS Gadgets 3 (beta)

Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Review: Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

  • First look at Ubuntu Intrepid Alpha 4
  • How to install ubuntu: a painless procedure
  • How to install a package in Ubuntu

ISO's Day of Shame

Filed under
OSS
  • ISO's Day of Shame

  • Not very appealing: ISO/IEC kicks out appeals
  • ISO, IEC reject appeals, approve OOXML spec

The end run around the OS is underway

blogs.zdnet: The operating system may be losing its luster. In fact, you could argue that the operating system–Linux, OS X and Windows–will become an application that just happens to boot first. And hardware vendors are on to the OS’s diminishing importance.

What Comes After the Windows Era?

linuxjournal.com: As a computer journalist for the last 25 years, I've received a lot of review copies of software. As something of an obsessive magpie, I've tended to keep most of it. Until yesterday, that is, when I finally threw out all those copies. What's makes this little spring-cleaning exercise particularly apt as well as cathartic is that all of us - and not just me - may finally be witnessing the end of the Windows era.

Linux community often tapped for beta testing

zdnetasia.com: It is common for the open source community to be called upon by vendors--including proprietary vendors--to be beta testers for Linux releases, according to an industry player.

Powerful graphical tools for Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: Linux has a bad reputation of having to use the Command Line Interface (CLI) to do anything really useful. In this article I will talk about some graphical interfaces for tools to get those "useful" things done.

Will Linux Ever Be a Contender?

Filed under
Linux

geeknewscentral.com: I read an article earlier this week saying that Linux sees a Windows Free world. Well if that's true, I would have to wonder what people would go to, because Linux is not it. At least, not now.

What Linux Will Look Like In 2012?

beranger.org: Since everybody seems be be anxious to comment an article from Information Week: What Linux Will Look Like In 2012, here's my take on how a typical, über-productive Linux desktop will look like in 2012:

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Aria2 - high speed command line download utility in Debian

  • Set up your firewall with Firewall Builder
  • Opera 9.52 RC1
  • OS implementation is another netbook differentiator
  • Submit your nominations for the 2008 Free Software Awards
  • Linux Review 10- OpenSUSE 11.0
  • Fluendo walks the line between free and proprietary codecs
  • Learn about the Open Source Census (video)
  • Mixed reactions to open source plan for schools
  • Plumber's 350 Linux desktops bonanza
  • Funny Things to do under Linux Terminal
  • 8 Ways to Showcase Your Open Source Skills and Get Hired
  • DebConf Gallery

The Ubuntu Artwork Circus

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonreagan.wordpress: It had been decided to create a new theme after each Long Term Support release, meaning that starting with Ubuntu 8.10, a new theme will be released, and there will be no new theme until after the next LTS release in 2010. During that period of time, the theme is fixed to be more appealing and complete.

Torvalds on Linux Security, Masturbating Monkeys, Whores and Idiots

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Linus Torvalds is a Finnish born software engineer best known for two things: kick starting the development of the Linux kernel, and owning the Linux trademark. Actually, make that three things. Torvalds has recently become very well known for speaking his mind...

Shuttleworth and Ubuntu keep moving on up

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ten years from now, if Linux has managed to gain something like 10 per cent or more of the desktop market and continues to maintain its lead in the server market, one person would have to take a goodly share of the credit - Mark Shuttleworth.

Tux3 Hierarchical Structure

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "It is about time to take a step back and describe what I have been implementing," began Daniel Phillips, referring to his new Tux3 filesystem. He provided a simple ASCII diagram that detailed the filesystem's hierarchical structure, describing each of the elements.

Why the F.U.D. against OpenGL 3.0?

Filed under
Software

zerias.blogspot: One of the big announcements at this years SIGGRAPH was the release of the OpenGL 3.0 specification. OpenGL is the definitive open-standard Application Interface for graphics in the computing industry, and is supported on hardware platforms ranging from the cellphone sector to the high end gaming console.

A sneak peak into Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • A sneak peak into Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex Alpha 4
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Screenshot Gallery: New Human-Murrine Theme
  • Why It’s Okay for Oracle, SAP to Skip Ubuntu (for Now)
  • Introduction and History of Kubuntu
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More in Tux Machines

Security: Google, Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), Quad9 and More

  • Google investigators find hackers swipe nearly 250,000 passwords a week
    Hackers are constantly trying to break into Google accounts, so Google researchers spent a year tracing how hackers steal passwords and expose them on the internet's black market. To gather hard evidence about the tools hackers use to swipe passwords, Google collaborated with University of California Berkeley cybersecurity experts to track activity on some of these markets. On Thursday, they published their results.
  • Time Will Tell if the New Vulnerabilities Equities Process Is a Step Forward for Transparency
    The White House has released a new and apparently improved Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), showing signs that there will be more transparency into the government’s knowledge and use of zero day vulnerabilities. In recent years, the U.S. intelligence community has faced questions about whether it “stockpiles” vulnerabilities rather than disclosing them to affected companies or organizations, and this scrutiny has only ramped up after groups like the Shadow Brokers have leaked powerful government exploits. According to White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Rob Joyce, the form of yesterday’s release and the revised policy itself are intended to highlight the government’s commitment to transparency because it’s “the right thing to do.”
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Quad9 Secure DNS Service Embeds IBM Security Intelligence
  • New “Quad9” DNS service blocks malicious domains for everyone
    The Global Cyber Alliance (GCA)—an organization founded by law enforcement and research organizations to help reduce cyber-crime—has partnered with IBM and Packet Clearing House to launch a free public Domain Name Service system. That system is intended to block domains associated with botnets, phishing attacks, and other malicious Internet hosts—primarily targeted at organizations that don't run their own DNS blacklisting and whitelisting services. Called Quad9 (after the 9.9.9.9 Internet Protocol address the service has obtained), the service works like any other public DNS server (such as Google's), except that it won't return name resolutions for sites that are identified via threat feeds the service aggregates daily.
  • The Internet of Shit is so manifestly insecure that people are staying away from it in droves
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • [Ubuntu] Security Team Weekly Summary: November 16, 2017
  • Hacking Blockchain with Smart Contracts to Control a Botnet
    Blockchain has been hailed by some in the technology industry as a potential method to help improve cyber security. However, security researcher Majid Malaika warns that Blockchain can potentially be abused to enable a new form of botnet that would be very difficult to take down. Malaika detailed his Blockchain-powered botnet in a session at the SecTor security conference on Nov. 15. The overall attack method has been dubbed "Botract" by Malaika, as it abuses inherent functionality in the smart contracts that help to enable Blockchain.
  • What Can The Philosophy of Unix Teach Us About Security?

Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

  • R600 Gallium3D Shader Image Support Lands, Other R600g Patches Pending
    As a follow-up to OpenGL 4.2 Support Could Soon Land For AMD Cayman GPUs On R600g, the patches have landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git! Plus other R600g patches are on the mailing list for review. These shader image support patches for R600g expose OpenGL's ARB_shader_image_size and ARB_shader_image_load_store for Radeon HD 5000/6000 series. In the process, this ends up taking Radeon HD 6900 "Cayman" GPUs to having OpenGL 4.2 compliance from 4.1 with the shader image support having been the last blocker. Other GPUs on R600g remain at OpenGL 3.3 due to lacking FP64 support, as outlined more extensively in that previous article.
  • GeForce GTX 900 Series Re-Clocking Patches Updated By Karol Herbst
    Frequent Nouveau open-source NVIDIA driver contributor Karol Herbst has posted his latest patch series in working towards GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell 2" graphics processor re-clocking.
  • 25 More AMDGPU DC Patches, Mostly Focused On Raven DCN
    DCN in this context is for current the DCN 1.0 Raven Ridge family of display engines. The just-launched Vega+Zen APUs feature a new display engine and that's what this DCN code is for, which is also under a separate Kconfig tunable from the rest of AMDGPU DC.

Development of Linux 4.15

  • Broadcom Hurricane 2 & Allwinner R40 Supported By Linux 4.15
    More ARM platform upstreaming has taken place for the Linux 4.15 kernel development cycle among other ARM hardware improvements.
  • Intel Coffee Lake & Cannonlake Thermal Support In Linux 4.15
    While Intel Coffee Lake hardware is shipping already, a few bits of tardy kernel code for these "8th Gen Core" CPUs is only hitting the Linux 4.15 kernel. The Intel DRM driver is most notably enabling Coffee Lake graphics by default in 4.15, but there's also some thermal code now landing among other changes now happening. Zhang Rui sent in the thermal updates for Linux 4.15 on Thursday and they include late additions for Coffee Lake but at the same time the relevant additions for Cannonlake that will be shipping in 2018 as the next-gen Intel CPUs.
  • AMDGPU DC Pull Request Submitted For Linux 4.15 Kernel - 132,395 Lines Of Code
    One day after submitting the main DRM feature pull request for Linux 4.15, David Airlie of Red Hat has submitted the secondary pull request that would feature the long-awaited introduction of AMDGPU DC into the mainline kernel.

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