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Saturday, 30 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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How to choose the right screenshot program

Filed under
Software

Because a picture can illustrate a program better than words can, screenshots are a fundamental of development and documentation. GNU/Linux has no shortage of versatile screenshot programs, both on the desktop or command line, but none is perfect for every use. I recently tried several screenshot programs. Here's my advice on what works best among the available options.

Ubuntu 6.10 RC Released

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linuxlookup has the announcment from the Ubuntu team announcing the Release Candidate for version 6.10 of Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Edubuntu - codenamed "Edgy Eft". The Release Candidate includes installable live Desktop CDs, server images, alternate text-mode installation CDs and an upgrade wizard for users of the current stable release.

How Hot Is the New Firefox Browser?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Chief among Firefox's improved security is antiphishing protection, which steers users away from malicious Web sites by checking them against a database of known phishing scams. Firefox updates the database when a user goes online, much the same way that most antivirus applications regularly update their databases of known virus attacks.

Tux Barada Nikto?

Filed under
Linux

The Linux operating environment keeps turning up in more and more nooks and crannies. At New York City's Wired NextFest, for example, Linux lurked hidden within robotic hands, "conversational" heads, and networked electronic musical instruments.

Tips and Tricks for the Linux Network Admin

Filed under
HowTos

Here's a roundup of some recent worthy happenings in the fun worlds of iptables and VoIP: getting SIP through iptables NAT firewalls, adding new modules to iptables with Patch-O-Matic, monitoring iptables in real-time, and a look at the excellent AstLinux, "the professional's PBX".

Updating Slackware using Swaret

Filed under
HowTos

Now that Slackware 11.0 is out, you may wonder what is the best way to update the distribution. Swaret is an open source project that aims to keep various versions of Slackware up-to-date. I use Swaret and some cron scripts to keep my servers current automatically.

Red Hat vows stronger beta 2 'within weeks'

Filed under
Linux

The beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 has some "warts," a Red Hat executive said Thursday, adding that the company will improve its documentation for the second beta release, particularly concerning virtualization.

Adobe Flash Player 9.0 Beta version for GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

The flash support for Firefox and other web browsers on Linux hinges on just one file which goes by the name "libflashplayer.so". Installing the new flash player ver 9.0 is a simple affair. You can do it in two ways.

Fedora Core 6 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Tuesday night Jesse Keating announced that Fedora Core 6 would not ship this week as many had hoped for, but rather will launch on Tuesday, October 24. This release was pushed back twice this week due to last minute bugs. However, with Rawhide being complete, all that is left is last minute testing and then spinning the ISOs and sending them off to the mirrors. For those dieing to see what Fedora Core 6 final shall look like, we have built it from Rawhide on October 18, which should be the final packages for this build.

Joomla CMS Dances Off the Mambo Floor

Filed under
Software

All together now (“Joomla” is Swahili for “all together”), watch the talented former Mambo open source programmers, now aligned with Joomla, twist, turn and spin their mouse wheels in the new Joomla Dance. The tenacious team has announced v1.5, one year after splitting off from the original Mambo project.

Windows servers at risk at Linux-friendly Bartter

Filed under
Linux

Australian poultry producer Bartter Enterprises is evaluating the future of around 70 Microsoft Windows servers, in the context of a recent migration of other systems to Red Hat Linux.

IE7 vulnerability discovered already

Filed under
Microsoft

INSECURITY FIRM Secunia, has already found an insecurity in newly unleashed IE7. The vulnerability can be exploited to disclose potentially sensitive information the firm says, though it gives it just two out of five on its criticality meter.

Read More Here.

OOoBasic crash course: Working with files

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice.org's OOoBasic gives users tools to programmatically access and manipulate files. To see how that works, we'll create a simple macro that allows you to save text snippets from the current document in a plain text file. This macro can be used to store text fragments from multiple documents in one text file, or to save deleted passages in an external file in case you need them later.

The Secret to Linux Dominance

Filed under
Linux

With Microsoft's Vista looking more like a joke everyday, there is a real opportunity for Linux to make a true attempt to go for the mainstream user. Unfortunately, it’s their openness and freedom that is holding them back.

Installing Flash Player 9 Beta On Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

OK finally Adobe has decided to release Flash Player 9 in Beta Form for Linux. I’ve decided to throw together a quick how to on how to install it on Ubuntu Edgy. This should hold true however for most flavours of Ubuntu as well.

Debian and the Creative Commons

Filed under
OSS

The problem essentially is this: none of the Creative Commons licenses have a "source" requirement (unlike the GPL, for example), because, being intended for creative content, it was generally felt that no definition of "source" was really workable, and what's worse, the intuitive rules for different media would likely be very different.

Another world for office

Filed under
Software

The good news is that Microsoft Office is not the end of it all. There are several alternate office suites in the market. The bad news is that vendors are not pushing news of their availability enough leading to low end user awareness levels. Here’s a look at the most popular suites available and what you should be watching out for, if you plan to invest in them.

GNOME v2.17.1 Screenshots

Filed under
Software

After last month's release of GNOME 2.16.0, the 2.17.1 release of GNOME has been announced this morning -- in the development cycle for the road to 2.18.0. The changes are fairly extensive already for being the first test release in the GNOME 2.18 cycle. Of the updated packages in this first development release is new encoding profile support in Banshee, network game support in many of GNOME Games, Gossip fixes, GNOME Power Manager advancements, and much more. We have already fired up GARNOME and have plenty of screenshots of the freshly-compiled GNOME 2.17.1.

GPL backers agree to disagree

Filed under
OSS

Admit it: you've never bothered reading the End-User Licence Agreements (EULAs) that came with your desktop software. But licences do matter. A new version of its overarching licence has opened a split between free and open source software.

Flash Player 9 Update

Filed under
Software

Adobe Labs is currently featuring prerelease versions of the Flash Player 9 Update software. This release includes a new feature to enable full screen mode in the web player, bug fixes and support for additional operating systems — specifically Microsoft® Windows™ Vista™ and Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenStack Roundup

  • OpenStack Summit Returns to Austin With Much Fanfare
    Back in July 2010, 75 developers gathered at the Omni hotel here for the very first OpenStack Summit. At the time, OpenStack was in the earliest stages of development. In April 2016, OpenStack returned to Austin in triumph as the de facto standard for private cloud deployment and the platform of choice for a significant share of the Fortune 100 companies. About 7,500 people from companies of all sizes from all over the world attended the 2016 OpenStack Summit in Austin from April 25 to April 29. In 2010, there were no users, because there wasn't much code running, but in 2016, that has changed. Among the many OpenStack users speaking at the summit were executives from Verizon and Volkswagen Group. While the genesis of OpenStack was a joint effort between NASA and Rackspace, the 2016 summit was sponsored by some of the biggest names in technology today—including IBM, Cisco, Dell, EMC and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some highlights of the 2016 OpenStack Summit.
  • A Look Into IBM's OpenStack Meritocracy
    Angel Diaz, IBM vice president of Cloud Architecture and Technology, discusses how Big Blue has earned its place in the OpenStack community.
  • OpenStack cloud’s “killer use case”: Telcos and NFV
    Today, 114 petabytes of data traverse AT&T's network daily, and the carrier predicts a 10x increase in traffic by 2020. To help manage this, AT&T is transitioning from purpose-built appliances to white boxes running open source software. And according to AT&T Senior Vice President of Software Development and Engineering Sarabh Saxena, OpenStack has been a key part of this shift.

Ubuntu 16.04 vs. vs. Clear Linux vs. openSUSE vs. Scientific Linux 7

Here are some extra Linux distribution benchmarks for your viewing pleasure this weekend. Following the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS last week, I was running another fresh performance comparison of various Linux distributions on my powerful Xeon E3-1270 v5 Skylake system. I made it a few Linux distributions in before the motherboard faced an untimely death. Not sure of the cause yet, but the motherboard is kaput and thus the testing was ended prematurely. Read more

GhostBSD 10.3 ALPHA1 is now ready for Testing

Yes we skip 10.2 for 10.3 since was FreeBSD 10.3 was coming we thought we should wait for 10.3. This is the first ALPHA development release for testing and debugging for GhostBSD 10.3, only as MATE been released yet which is available on SourceForge and for the amd64 and i386 architectures. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu-based Smartphones And Tablets Sound Good, On Paper, But...Do They Make Any Sense?
    As I previously stated in a recent article, I'm a huge fan of Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. It's friendly, reliable, consumes little resources and is largely virus-free.
  • Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ expected to be based on Ubuntu 16.04
    Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ coming soon, to be based on Ubuntu 16.04 and have plenty of new features
  • BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet - The heat is on
    Some investments are financial. Some are emotional. When it comes to Linux on tablets, my motives are mostly of the latter kind. I was super-excited to learn BQ was launching a tablet with Ubuntu, something that I have been waiting for a good solid three years now. We had the phone released last spring, and now there's a tablet. The cycle is almost complete. Now, as you know, I was only mildly pleased with the Ubuntu phone. It is a very neat product, but it is not yet as good as the competitors, across all shades of the usability spectrum. But this tablet promises a lot. Full HD, desktop-touch continuum, seamless usage model, and more. Let us have a look.
  • Kubuntu-16.04 — a review
    The kubuntu implementation of Plasma 5 seems to work quite well. It’s close to what I am seeing in other implementations. It includes the Libre Office software, rather than the KDE office suite. But most users will prefer that anyway. I’m not a big fan of the default menu. But the menu can easily be switched to one of the alternative forms. I’ve already done that, and am preferring the “launcher based on cascading popup menus”. If you are trying kubuntu, I suggest you experiment with the alternative formats to see which you prefer.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review: Very Stable & Improved, Buggy Software Center, Though
    In almost all the occasions that I tested Ubuntu LTS releases, quite rightly so, they’ve always worked better than the non-LTS releases. And this Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the 6th of such release is no exception. This one actually is even more impressive than the others because it has addressed some security related issues and even although not critical, subtle issues that I mentioned in the review. As far as the performance was concerned, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was only largely outperformed by the memory usage where there is a large increase in memory usage. Other than that, those numbers look pretty good to me. That ‘.deb’ file issues with the Software Center is the only major concern that I can come up with. But I’m sure it’ll be fixed very soon.