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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Hands on with Korora 19 'Bruce' srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:32pm
Story StartOS 6 GNOME 3 and KDE preview srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:29pm
Story DoudouLinux Review: Expose your children to Linux srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:27pm
Story Linux Mint 15 Interview – HTML5, Arch and the MintBox srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:22pm
Story LXDE previews Qt port of its desktop srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 6:18pm
Story Dell XPS 13: Free as in Freedom srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 4:03pm
Story Win back your digital independence with Mandriva srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 4:02pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 5:09am
Story 5 Intriguing New Features in Linux 3.10 srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 2:29am
Story Change OSS Licenses to Make More Money? srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 1:00am

Open source all about free and freedom

Filed under
OSS

The Oregonian: As director of the California-based Linux Foundation, Jim Zemlin circles the globe proclaiming the virtues of open source software -- computer programs that are written collaboratively by developers all over the world, and are frequently given away free.

Decibel Audio Player: An Audio Player for Human Beings

Filed under
Software

DPotD: Aren’t you tired of those audio players with billions of useless features that clutter up their graphical interface? I am. Decibel Audio Player is a simple and nice audio player for the GNOME desktop. Decibel Audio Player follows as closely as possible the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines.

Fixing NTFS Deadlocks

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: This NTFS update fixes the deadlock at mount time reported by several people over the years but it was only recently that someone who reported it actually replied to my response and helped me track it down (I have never been able to reproduce the deadlock).

Linux is a no-go

Filed under
Ubuntu

faler.wordpress: As for my opinion of Ubuntu? Pretty much a pile of dog shit. It tries hard to be “user friendly”, but still doesn’t go far enough like Windows, and you still end up having to edit obscure files like in traditional linux distros, only difference is the “user friendly” helper applications may overwrite your changes.

What does KDE mean to you?

Filed under
KDE

wadejolson.wordpress: In my ongoing series of asking people to reflect on “what does KDE mean to you?”… taking the standard question of “What does KDE stand for?”asked by people curious about the acronym and twisting it around to make it hopefully a more interesting answer and a bit more introspective.

Why Linux is Ready, Not Ready for the Desktop and Why we Care in the Wrong Way

Filed under
Linux

ciganthought.blogspot: We've all read these articles, and most of us have written angry responses. Listing flaws that either we all know about, or flaws we have no control over. These articles get it wrong because Linux is indeed ready for OUR desktops, and obviously ready for the desktops of certain professional developers, and public library and education stations. Well you know why it's ready for those desktops?

Ubuntu takes advantage

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.blanco.net.ve: Yes, the next Oct. 18, Venezuelan institutions should report their progress in the process of migration to Linux. However, at this time there are many who have not done anything and others who rush passage.

15 New Ubuntu Distributions

Filed under
Humor

Chris Pirillo:

  1. Fugubuntu = Linux for Poisonous (Yet Tasty) Fish

  2. Stewbuntu = Edible Linux Compiled with Gigantic Meat Chunks

I want to be a MOTU, but…

Filed under
Linux

nixternal: Well, I just wanted to write up a quick post here and let you know that it isn’t all that hard. If you just started using Ubuntu, or Linux in general, then yes, it might be a tad bit hard at first. If you can compile and install a tarball, then you are well on your way.

OpenOffice 3.0 Wants to Compete with Outlook

Filed under
OOo

cybernet: I was just over at the OpenOffice site browsing through some of their marketing materials to see if there was anything interesting. I came across a presentation and it walked through some of the most notable features that are expected to be released in the next big OpenOffice milestone.

Mac OS, Linux May Share a Windows Flaw

Filed under
Security

PCWorld: This week Microsoft Corp said it would patch Windows to reduce the risk of a new kind of Web-based security vulnerability, but security researchers say that other operating systems are probably at risk too.

Linux Doesn't Need To Look Like Windows

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: After reading colleague Alexander Wolfe's piece about a Linux distro called "Vixta" that apes the look and feel of Windows Vista, I confess to having mixed feelings about the whole thing. Mostly negative ones.

Kubuntu 7.10: The end of an era?

Filed under
Ubuntu

pinderkent.blogsavy.com: Kubuntu 7.10 RC was announced as available several days ago. While other articles will no doubt focus on the many benefits that Kubuntu 7.10 will bring, I’d like to look forward into the future. Namely, this is because of the upcoming release of KDE 4, which is currently planned for December 11, 2007.

Software Review: Windows Out, Linspire In!

Filed under
Linux

bloggernews.net: I have spent the last week in Windows hell, I have been the victim of virus writers, and indeed a victim of Microsoft themselves, I believe they call the program “Windows Genuine (DIS)advantage”. When I saw the Press Release for Linspire I was skeptical to say the least. Generally speaking Linux requires a PHD in Astro Physics just to log in. It then requires a double PHD just to browse a web site.

My Week in Ubuntu: Gutsy Upgrade!

Filed under
Ubuntu

torgodevil.com: Gutsy FINAL isn’t due out until October 18th, but they’ve released a “Release Candidate” version that’s probably going to be the final version baring any major fuckmuppetry. Since the command to upgrade was LITERALLY one line of short code, I figured “What the hell?

Lessons learned from open source Xara's failure

linux.com: On October 11, 2005, proprietary software maker Xara announced its plans to open the source code to its flagship vector graphics package Xara Xtreme, and with the help of community developers port it to Linux. Today, two years later, the project is stagnant and on the verge of irrelevance, primarily because the company couldn't figure out how to work with the open source community.

Linux MOST Frequent Problems: Their Cause and Solutions

Filed under
HowTos

jensonsblog.blogspot: These are some various linux/unix problems I've encountered over the years, but which I was not able to find a solution for online. Hopefully this will save you the trouble I had.

10 Features in 10 Days: Desktop Effects with Compiz

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Today we soldier on to Desktop Effects with Compiz Fusion. It can be safely said that few features are as keenly desired as Desktop Effects. Ever since Compiz was announced XXX years ago, users and developers have been playing with the bling-tastic effects and wondering when it will hit a desktop near them.

Linux patent lawsuit: follow the money

Filed under
Legal

matt asay: Why sue two companies with nonexistent desktop businesses when Microsoft provides the biggest potential jackpot of all? (After all, this same company sued and settled with Apple earlier this year.) Unless, of course, it is Microsoft funding the whole thing?

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More in Tux Machines

Digital audio and video editing in GNU/Linux

  • Linux Digital Audio Workstation Roundup
    In the world of home studio recording, the digital audio workstation is one of the most important tools of the trade. Digital audio workstations are used to record audio and MIDI data into patterns or tracks. This information is then typically mixed down into songs or albums. In the Linux ecosystem, there is no shortage of Digital audio workstations to chose from. Whether you wish to create minimalist techno or full orchestral pieces, chances are there is an application that has you covered. In this article, we will take a brief look into several of these applications and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. I will try to provide a fair evaluation of the DAWs presented here but at the end of the day, I urge you to try a few of these applications and to form an opinion of your own.
  • Shotcut Video Editor Available As A Snap Package [Quick Update]
    Shotcut is a free, open source Qt5 video editor developed on the MLT Multimedia Framework (it's developed by the same author as MLT), available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Under the hood, Shotcut uses FFmpeg, so it supports many audio, video and image formats, along with screen, webcam and audio capture. The application doesn't require importing files, thanks to its native timeline editing. Other features worth mentioning are multitrack timeline with thumbnails and waveforms, 4k resolution support, video effects, as well as a flexible UI with dockable panels.
  • Simple Screen Recorder Is Now Available as a Snap App
    Simple Screen Recorder, a popular screen recording app for Linux desktops, is now available to install as a Snap app from the Ubuntu Store.

Kernel News: Linux 4.10 in SparkyLinux, Wayland 1.13.0, and Weston 2.0 RC2

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Lands in SparkyLinux's Unstable Repo, Here's How to Install It
    The trend of offering users the most recent Linux kernel release continues today with SparkyLinux, an open-source, Debian-based distribution that always ships with the latest GNU/Linux technologies and software versions. SparkyLinux appears to be the third distro to offer its users the ability to install the recently released Linux 4.10 kernel, after Linux Lite and Ubuntu, as the developers announced earlier that the Linux kernel 4.10 packages are now available from the unstable repository.
  • Wayland 1.13.0 Display Server Officially Released, Wayland 1.14 Lands in June
    Bryce Harrington, a Senior Open Source Developer at Samsung, announced today the release and general availability of the Wayland 1.13.0 for GNU/Linux distributions that already adopted the next-generation display server.next-generation display server. Wayland 1.13.0 has entered development in the first days of the year, but the first Alpha build arrived at the end of January, along with the Alpha version of the Weston 2.0 compositor, including most of the new features that are present in this final release that you'll be able to install on your Linux-based operating systems in the coming days.
  • Weston 2.0 RC2 Wayland Compositor Arrives With Last Minute Fixes
    While Wayland 1.13 was released today, Bryce Harrington today opted against releasing the Weston 2.0 reference compositor and instead issue a second release candidate. Weston 2.0 is the next version of this "playground" for Wayland compositor technologies since the new output configuration API had broke the ABI, necessitating a break from the same versioning as Wayland.
  • [ANNOUNCE] weston 1.99.94

KDE Leftovers

  • Fedora 25 KDE: disappointing experience
    Fedora is not a frequent guest on the review deck of Linux notes from DarkDuck blog. The most recent review was of Fedora 22 back in July 2015. That was a review of the GNOME version, the most native for Fedora. You are probably aware of the tight link between the GNOME project and RedHat, the Fedora Project main sponsor.
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 Unity 8 - KDE apps native on Mir
  • Plasma in a Snap?
    Shortly before FOSDEM, Aleix Pol asked if I had ever put Plasma in a Snap. While I was a bit perplexed by the notion itself, I also found this a rather interesting idea. So, the past couple of weeks I spent a bit of time here and there on trying to see if it is possible.
  • QStringView Diaries: Advances in QStringLiteral
    This is the first in a series of blog posts on QStringView, the std::u16string_view equivalent for Qt. You can read about QStringView in my original post to the Qt development mailing-list, follow its status by tracking the “qstringview” topic on Gerrit and learn about string views in general in Marshall Clow’s CppCon 2015 talk, aptly named “string_view”.
  • Making Movies with QML
    One of the interesting things about working with Qt is seeing all the unexpected ways our users use the APIs we create. Last year I got a bug report requesting an API to set a custom frame rate for QML animations when using QQuickRenderControl. The reason was that the user was using QQuickRenderControl as an engine to render video output from Qt Quick, and if your target was say 24 frames per second, the animations were not smooth because of how the default animation driver behaves. So inspired by this use case I decided to take a stab at creating such an example myself.
  • How to Create a Look and Feel Theme
  • United Desktop Theme for KDE Plasma 5.9
  • KDE Talks at FOSDEM
    The continuation of the original talk from Dirk Hohndel and Linus Torvalds about the port of Subsurface from Gtk to Qt, now with mobile in mind.

SteamVR for Linux, Benchmarks of HITMAN on NVIDIA

  • SteamVR for Linux is now officially in Beta
    Valve have put up SteamVR for Linux officially in Beta form and they are keen to stress that this is a development release. You will need to run the latest Steam Beta Client for it to work at all, so be sure to opt-in if you want to play around with it.
  • Valve Publishes A SteamVR Developer Build For Linux
    Valve has begun rolling out their SteamVR Linux support by announcing today a beta/developer build of their VR support for Linux. Valve's SteamVR for Linux page was updated today to reflect the build becoming public via the Steam beta channel, "This is a development release. It is intended to allow developers to start creating SteamVR content for Linux platforms. Limited hardware support is provided, and pre-release drivers are required. Linux support is currently only available in the "beta" branch, make sure you are using SteamVR[beta] before reporting issues."
  • HITMAN Linux Benchmarks On 12 NVIDIA GPUs
    Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated port of HITMAN for Linux. While at first it didn't look like this Linux game port would work out for our benchmarking requirements, thanks to Feral it does indeed work for another interesting Linux gaming test perspective. For our initial HITMAN Linux benchmarks are tests from 12 NVIDIA GeForce GPUs while our Radeon tests will come tomorrow.