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Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

The Ubuntu Code of Conduct : What We Stand For

Filed under
Ubuntu

A conversation that I had yesterday has reminded me of the Ubuntu Code of Conduct and what we try to stand for as an Ubuntu community. Any Ubuntu Member (official) is required to sign this article. For those unfamiliar with the Code of Conduct I wanted to share it here.

Of Apples and Oranges, GNOME and KDE

Filed under
Software

I find Linus’ GNOME-bashing phenomenally, umm, retarded. GNOME is made for those who want computers to be usable. I am sure there are many who appreciate KDE’s configurability, but the first feeling that hits me on logging into KDE is a feeling of being lost.

MEPIS founder clarifies MEPIS/Ubuntu relationship

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

MEPIS Linux founder Warren Woodford began, a year ago, to migrate MEPIS from Debian to Ubuntu packages, and in July achieved the first Ubuntu-based simplyMEPIS release. In light of the recently announced Linspire/Ubuntu collaboration, DesktopLinux.com asked Woodford to clarify the MEPIS/Ubuntu relationship.

aKademy Talks Deadline Extended

Filed under
KDE

Due to a beastie in the submissions system, the aKademy 2007 Programme Committee have extended the deadline for talk proposals until February 23rd.

How to Explain DRM to Your Dad

Filed under
Misc

My friend John was trying to think of a way to explain the problem with digital rights management to his dad and friend of ours who don't see what's wrong with it. He compiled a list of examples of DRM-related problems to help people understand what the big deal is with DRM.

Vincent Danen: Yet Another Secure Linux Distro.. why?

Filed under
Linux

On IRC last night I was pointed to a new secure linux distro... this one simply called Hardened Linux. The individual whom I was speaking with ("Intensity") was wondering why there needed to be YASLD (Yet Another Secure Linux Distro). Interested, I was reading through the page to see if there was anything unique...

Amateurs and pros seek common ground in open source

Filed under
OSS

The open source movement was created by amateurs, and amateurs are still important to its success. But as more professional organizations become involved splits develop. I got a good taste of it this week after writing about Debian.

One ring to rule them all … xcompmgr, transset-df and 3ddesktop

Filed under
Software

A year ago (actually about 15 months, if memory serves), before Beryl and before Compiz, 3ddesktop was a popular toy. It doesn’t compare to a full-scale Beryl rig with all the bells and whistles, but it’s light enough not to need extraordinary hardware and easy enough to set up that it doesn’t need much explanation.

DREAMLINUX : Not Quiet a Dream but still Good

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The number of linux distributions just keeps on increasing every now and then a new distro pops up claiming to be different from other but most of them are remarkably similar. However Dreamlinux was one distro i was highly impressed with.

My Desktop Arcade Revival - part 1

Filed under
Gaming

I was recently thrilled to discover XMAME. XMAME is the Unix/Linux port of MAME, the Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator. It installs and runs without a hitch on an average Linux setup, and may even have a package ready for your system. But getting XMAME isn't enough; you need ROMs. Some ROMs come with the software in packages that I've tried.

See the total lunar eclipse on March 3, 2007

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Without a total eclipse in almost two-and-one-half years, sky gazers will be able to observe a total lunar eclipse on Saturday, March 3, 2007 from the eastern Americas, the United Kingdom, Europe, Africa, Iceland, Greenaldn, Arctic, the Middle East in western Asia.

Can Open Source Apps Find Strength in Numbers?

Filed under
OSS

Observations I drew from this week's LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit are that (1) location does matter, in both physical and market space and (2) some people have a strange notion of what constititues an IT solution. Regarding market space – namely how to go about creating some – the interesting news at the summit was the annoucement of a new Open Solutions Alliance.

Open Source Festival, Envisage '07

Filed under
OSS

The Institute of Informatics and Communication, University of Delhi South Campus, has announced its second annual inter-collegiate open source technical festival, Envisage '07 to be held on 24-25th February 2007.

Special Purpose Network Addresses Every System admin need to know

Filed under
HowTos

Different types of Classes of Network

Class A Addresses
Class A address must be between 0 and 127
network.node.node.node

A dvd::rip Tip

Filed under
HowTos

After my previous post on dvd::rip, I continued to experiment with batch processing that would allow me to have titles from multiple DVD's in the queue at the same time. Fortunately, the method didn't take long to discover and before long I was up and running more efficiently than I ever had been before. Here's how I did it.

The Bottom Line of Hardware

Filed under
OSS

An open source developer schedules a meeting with a hardware vendor. The purpose of the meeting is to request that the vendor consider releasing the driver support for their products (we'll call them Widgets) to open source. "Why should we, Widgetmaker, want to do that?"

Also: NDAd Drivers Don't Make Everyone Happy

The end of something

Filed under
MDV

So, that's it, warly is gone (from Mandriva). Tonight, we had his departure party, which was really nice, it's probably the best celebration we have done for months: almost all the company was here, even sage gurus and missed co-workers that left the company came back to "celebrate" the event with us.

A quick review of Knoppix 5.1, part 2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

It's impossible to write a decent review of any complex distribution, let alone Knoppix. These few posts are a quick pass at features that caught my eye while I had Knoppix up and running. This time I'm going to look at two IDEs, Eclipse and MonoDevelop.

Configuring OpenOffice.org Writer

Filed under
HowTos

Like other OpenOffice.org applications, Writer has dozens of options available from Tools > Options > OpenOffice.org Writer. These options allow you to adjust both the general settings of Writer and specific options for different kinds of formatting. Many are ideal for desktop publishing, and a similar set of options is available for web documents under Tools > Options > OpenOffice.org Writer/Web.

LinuxWorld: It's About The Apps (Dummy)!

Filed under
Linux

Open source is more than just Linux. It's more than just infrastructure and it can save you money. These were some of the messages to float out of the LinuxWorld Open Solutions Summit in New York this week.

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More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Stardew Valley is now in beta for Linux
    The Stardew Valley developer tweeted out a password for a beta, but after discussing it with them on their forum I was able to show them that we can't actually access it yet. While what I was telling them may not have been entirely correct (SteamDB is confusing), the main point I made was correct. Normal keys are not able to access the beta yet, but beta/developer keys can, as it's not currently set for Linux/Mac as a platform for us.
  • Physics-based 3D puzzler Human: Fall Flat released on Steam for Linux
    Human: Fall Flat is an open-ended physics puzzler with an optional local co-op mode, developed by No Brakes Games, and available now on Steam for Linux.
  • 7 Mages brings a touch more of traditional dungeon crawling to Linux
    Controlling a party of adventurers, exploring dungeons and fighting weird magical creatures is an RPG tradition as old as the genre. Expect all that and more in this modern iteration of the classical dungeon crawler.

Linux and Graphics

Security News

  • Security advisories for Monday
  • EU to Give Free Security Audits to Apache HTTP Server and Keepass
    The European Commission announced on Wednesday that its IT engineers would provide a free security audit for the Apache HTTP Server and KeePass projects. The EC selected the two projects following a public survey that took place between June 17 and July 8 and that received 3,282 answers. The survey and security audit are part of the EU-FOSSA (EU-Free and Open Source Software Auditing) project, a test pilot program that received funding of €1 million until the end of the year.
  • What is your browser really doing?
    While Microsoft would prefer you use its Edge browser on Windows 10 as part of its ecosystem, the most popular Windows browser is Google’s Chrome. But there is a downside to Chrome – spying and battery life. It all started when Microsoft recently announced that its Edge browser used less battery power than Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox or Opera on Windows 10 devices. It also measured telemetry – what the Windows 10 device was doing when using different browsers. What it found was that the other browsers had a significantly higher central processing unit (CPU), and graphics processing unit (GPU) overhead when viewing the same Web pages. It also proved that using Edge resulted in 36-53% more battery life when performing the same tasks as the others. Let’s not get into semantics about which search engine — Google or Bing — is better; this was about simple Web browsing, opening new tabs and watching videos. But it started a discussion as to why CPU and GPU usage was far higher. And it relates to spying and ad serving.
  • Is Computer Security Becoming a Hardware Problem?
    In December of 1967 the Silver Bridge collapsed into the Ohio River, killing 46 people. The cause was determined to be a single 2.5 millimeter defect in a single steel bar—some credit the Mothman for the disaster, but to most it was an avoidable engineering failure and a rebuttal to the design philosophy of substituting high-strength non-redundant building materials for lower-strength albeit layered and redundant materials. A partial failure is much better than a complete failure. [...] In 1996, Kocher co-authored the SSL v3.0 protocol, which would become the basis for the TLS standard. TLS is the difference between HTTP and HTTPS and is responsible for much of the security that allows for the modern internet. He argues that, barring some abrupt and unexpected advance in quantum computing or something yet unforeseen, TLS will continue to safeguard the web and do a very good job of it. What he's worried about is hardware: untested linkages in digital bridges.
  • Your Smart Robot Is Coming in Five Years, But It Might Get Hacked and Kill You
    A new report commissioned by the Department of Homeland Security forecasts that autonomous artificially intelligent robots are just five to 10 years away from hitting the mainstream—but there’s a catch. The new breed of smart robots will be eminently hackable. To the point that they might be re-programmed to kill you. The study, published in April, attempted to assess which emerging technology trends are most likely to go mainstream, while simultaneously posing serious “cybersecurity” problems. The good news is that the near future is going to see some rapid, revolutionary changes that could dramatically enhance our lives. The bad news is that the technologies pitched to “become successful and transformative” in the next decade or so are extremely vulnerable to all sorts of back-door, front-door, and side-door compromises.
  • Trump, DNC, RNC Flunk Email Security Test
    At issue is a fairly technical proposed standard called DMARC. Short for “domain-based messaging authentication reporting and conformance,” DMARC tries to solve a problem that has plagued email since its inception: It’s surprisingly difficult for email providers and end users alike to tell whether a given email is real – i.e. that it really was sent by the person or organization identified in the “from:” portion of the missive.
  • NIST Prepares to Ban SMS-Based Two-Factor Authentication
    The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has released the latest draft version of the Digital Authentication Guideline that contains language hinting at a future ban on SMS-based Two-Factor Authentication (2FA). The Digital Authentication Guideline (DAG) is a set of rules used by software makers to build secure services, and by governments and private agencies to assess the security of their services and software. NIST experts are constantly updating the guideline, in an effort to keep pace with the rapid change in the IT sector.
  • 1.6m Clash of Kings forum accounts 'stolen'
    Details about 1.6 million users on the Clash of Kings online forum have been hacked, claims a breach notification site. The user data from the popular mobile game's discussion forum were allegedly targeted by a hacker on 14 July. Tech site ZDNet has reported the leaked data includes email addresses, IP addresses and usernames.
  • Hacker steals 1.6 million accounts from top mobile game's forum
    [Ed: vBulletin is proprietary software -- the same crap Canonical used for Ubuntu forums]

The saga continues with Slackware 14.2

Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution and has been maintained since its birth by Patrick Volkerding. Slackware has a well deserved reputation for being stable, consistent and conservative. Slackware is released when it is ready, rather than on a set schedule, and fans of the distribution praise its no-frills and no-fuss design. Slackware adheres to a "keep it simple" philosophy similar to Arch Linux, in that the operating system does not do a lot of hand holding or automatic configuration. The user is expected to know what they are doing and the operating system generally stays out of the way. The latest release of Slackware, version 14.2, mostly offers software updates and accompanying hardware support. A few new features offer improved plug-n-play support for removable devices and this release of Slackware ships with the PulseAudio software. PulseAudio has been commonly found in the audio stack of most Linux distributions for several years, but that is a signature of Slackware: adding new features when they are needed, not when they become available. In this case PulseAudio was required as a dependency for another package. Slackware 14.2 is available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds for the x86 architecture. There is also an ARM build. While the main edition of Slackware is available as an installation disc only, there is a live edition of Slackware where we can explore a Slackware-powered desktop environment without installing the distribution. The live edition can be found on the Alien Base website. Both the live edition and the main installation media are approximately 2.6GB in size. For the purposes of this review I will be focusing on the main, installation-only edition. Booting from the install media brings us to a text screen where we are invited to type in any required kernel parameters. We can press the Enter key to take the default settings or wait two minutes for the media to continue booting. A text prompt then offers to let us load an alternative keyboard layout or use the default "US" layout. We are then brought to a text console where a brief blurb offers us tips for setting up disk partitions and swap space. The helpful text says we can create partitions and then run the system installer by typing "setup". Read more