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About Tux Machines

Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nordic Free Software Award srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 5:18am
Story Trouble With Open-Source Doom 3 srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 5:10am
Story 40 years of Intel CPUs srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 5:04am
Story Hollywood and Congress Target Mozilla srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 5:01am
Story Learning from GNOME srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:12am
Story Unix and Linux: a bit of history srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:10am
Story Almost openSUSE 12.1 srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:08am
Poll Fav Distro (nov '11) srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:40pm
Story KDE vs. Trinity: Is One Really Better? srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:22pm
Story Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2011 is here srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:20pm

Librarian's video about installing Ubuntu on library PCs

Filed under
Ubuntu

boing boing: Internet folk-hero and librarian Jessamyn got some donated PCs without any operating system on them at her library, so she installed Ubuntu Linux.

Distro Change

Filed under
Linux

lockergnome blogs: Change! That is the name of the game. Picked up a “new” computer cheap the other day. I thought I’d give Ubuntu another try. Well I loaded it up and quite honestly I still don’t see what all the fuss is about it. So I installed PCLinuxOS.

Automatix - an essential add-on that further mainstreams Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

ZDNet: As I grow increasingly fond of my Kubuntu install, I'm looking for any avenues that might make it even easier for the average ed tech guy (or girl) to deploy on the average PC in our environment. While the setup is largely straightforward, there are a few niggles that make it a bit less plug and play than Windows or Mac.

What's a Linux Guy Doing at Sun?

Filed under
Misc

eWeek: That's the question Ian Murdock, chief open source platform strategist at Sun Microsystems Inc., posed in a session he chaired at Sun's CommunityOne Day on May 7 prior to the opening of the JavaOne conference.

Mandriva 2007 Spring packs a punch

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

Linux.com: Mandriva recently released its first distro of the year, dubbed Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring. Like previous releases, Spring is available in five editions, two of which can be freely downloaded. I installed and worked with the $76 Powerpack edition, which includes support and several gigabytes of packages. Not only does Powerpack score over other multiple CD/DVD free-of-cost distros, it also makes competing non-free distros eat dust.

Blob Wars : Blob and Conquer 0.90

Filed under
Gaming

Linuxgames: Version 0.90 of Blob Wars : Blob and Conquer, a 3rd person action shooter, is now available to download.

Ubuntu Developer Summit in Full Swing

Filed under
Ubuntu

Jono Bacon: Kick arse. Kick arse. Those are the only ways to describe the Ubuntu Developer Summit. Here we are in Seville having a blast and getting some really productive work done. I have actually been here since Wednesday for the Ubuntu Education Summit and the Ubucon, and everything has been running smoothly.

When faculty say ‘NO’ to UNIX/Linux

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet Education: Well, sooner or later, it was bound to happen. We are in the process of retiring our last two instructional UNIX/Linux labs. And guess what? Nobody seems to care!

Linux: LogFS, A New Flash Filesystem

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Jörn Engel announced LogFS, "a scalable flash filesystem." The project's home page notes that LogFS aims to be the successor of JFFS2, "the two main problems of JFFS2 are memory consumption and mount time. Unlike most filesystems, there is no tree structure of any sorts on the medium."

Get a daily overview of your system with Logwatch

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise and CentOS systems (and possibly more distributions too) ship with a tool called Logwatch. Logwatch is absolutely invaluable if you’re running a server of any kind as it allows you to stay up-to-date with what’s going on inside your system.

The straw men of open source

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: The straw man in this case is the Microsoft-led argument that using Linux carries patent risks. It doesn't. But signing on to the idea that it might is like my running bet that I'll die next year. It's insurance.

7 Challenges Red Hat Faces to Remain Open Source's Finest

Filed under
Linux

Seeking Alpha: When Red Hat kicks off its annual customer conference today in San Diego, I will be watching closely. The company faces at least seven key challenges--and opportunities--as it tries to remain the open source industry's most successful company. Here's the rundown.

SLAX 6.0.0 RC3 Screenshots

Phoronix: SLAX is one of our favorite Linux distributions so when SLAX 6.0 RC3 was released you can be sure that had caught our attention. New in SLAX 6.0.0 RC3 is the Linux 2.6.21.1 kernel, full NTFS write support, and upgrades to Slackware current.

Extending OpenOffice.org: Creating self-running presentations with IndeView

Filed under
HowTos

Linux.com: Although OpenOffice.org doesn't allow you to create self-running Impress presentations, there is a tool that can help you with that. Using IndeView, you can convert your Impress presentations into a self-contained package that can run off a CD or DVD on Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows.

Red Hat's Answer to Novell Market Start

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Red Hat Exchange (RHX) was a part of the hoopla surrounding Red Hat's release of its next-generation Linux platform. The Exchange, which is expected to formally be launched on May 10 at the Red Hat Summit, is an effort to make it easier for end users to get a myriad of third-party vendors' applications directly from Red Hat.

Ubuntu Linux 7.0x

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

techbookreport: For a beginner contemplating switching to Linux there are a bewildering number of flavours to choose from. For those coming from the world of Windows, this wide range of Linux distributions presents a real dilemma. In that kind of situation, Ubuntu Linux should be high on the list of candidates.

Doom 3 Mod Last Man Standing Coop Version 4.0 Update!

Filed under
Gaming

Linux-gamers: Some recent news just reached us from the doom3 LMS project: As always there are a lot of exciting things going on at Last Man Standing Co-op! We are moving forward to the 4.0 release and we have a lot of neat goodies for you.

Linux evolves for mobile phones

BBC: A version of the increasingly popular Linux operating system Ubuntu will be developed for use on net-enabled phones and devices. The Ubuntu Mobile and Embedded project aims to create the open source platform for initial release in October 2007.

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. This tutorial shows people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop.

The Tale of the Accidental Upgrade

Filed under
Linux

bmc blogs: An old friend here at the office was working late, and I was there working on IT360/Linuxworld. He dropped by my designated work area, and we got to talking about Linux. He was asking (in essence) why I like Linux. The reason he was asking was that he had tried to install SUSE as his first Linux.

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