Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 21 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Automotive Grade Linux Released: An Interview With Dan Cauchy Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 9:29pm
Story 3 ways to contribute to Firefox OS Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 8:55pm
Story Linux Foundation SysAdmin Andy Grimberg Loves New Tech and Snowboarding Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 6:05pm
Story Preview: Benchmarking CentOS 7.0 & Scientific Linux 7.0 Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:53pm
Story LXLE 14.04 review – new paradigms Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:46pm
Story Samsung Nixes Knox: The Android Security Saga Continues Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:42pm
Story On Plasma 5 Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 5:35pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.14.12 LTS Brings Updated Nouveau and Radeon Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 1:32pm
Story The future of realtime Linux in doubt Roy Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 12:16pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.4.98 LTS Brings Updated Wireless Drivers and Better PowerPC Support Rianne Schestowitz 10/07/2014 - 12:04pm

Ubuntu is early favorite in initial OpenLogic open source survey returns

Filed under
Ubuntu

techtarget.com: Launched with fanfare a month and a half ago, OpenLogic Inc.'s Open Source Census, a survey of open source software adoption has scanned more than a thousand computers to date, but the tally is far short of the volume required to draw meaningful conclusions.

Forth and back again - having a look at Fedora 9 and KDE 4.1beta

Filed under
KDE

liquidat.wordpress: Recently my distribution of choice, Fedora, published a new version, Fedora 9. This one featured KDE 4.0, and there were also KDE 4.0.80 packages available, and I decided to take a look at them. Unfortunately, I had to return to Fedora 8 and KDE 3.5.9 - but not for long, that’s for sure.

Why Linux Failed at Walmart -- And What to Do About It

Filed under
Linux

Matt Hartley: Over the past few years, various distributions have worked to make a name for themselves by selling their Linux PCs over retail Websites provided by Walmart, Sears and so on. Yet in nearly every instance, there has been a sudden stopping point where the big box retailer drops the provided Linux PCs like a rock.

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • SuperKaramba - Adding Beauty to Your KDE Desktop

  • linuX-gamers.net live 0.9.3 released
  • Linux Outlaws 42 - Don't Panic!

KOffice 2.0 Alpha 8

Filed under
Software

kde.org: The KDE Project today announced the eighth alpha release of KOffice 2, a technology preview of the upcoming version 2.0. Work continues in the same vein as before, with a strong focus on finishing and polishing our new features that will set KOffice.

How many ways can you install an RPM in OpenSUSE Linux?

Filed under
Software
SUSE

suseblog.com: I wanted to see how many ways I could install a package on OpenSUSE 10.3 (and 11.0, for that matter) without any help from any third-party package management tools that don’t come stock on a fresh OpenSUSE install.

Get the Facts Straight

Filed under
Linux

tuxtraining.com: Linux is the best OS there is. Period. There, I said it. Usually this site strays away from opinion but I couldn’t resist this time. LinuxHater is grabbing a bunch of attention lately by carrying the flag of Microsoft’s FUD in a rather explicit way. It’s time for a rather extensive but to-the-point reminder why Linux is the best OS on this planet.

Opera 9.5 Unleashed

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: After months of public inactivity, Opera has been racing to release the latest version of its desktop browser. No guesses why. Opera 9.50 is out today, and we've been on the case of Kestrel since the first public preview last autumn.

The power of ‘root’ in Linux

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: ‘Root’ is the default name for system administrator in a *NIX system — a super user who can do anything and everything within the operating system. Let us go a little deep about the access privileges and rights which a root user has on a Linux system.

Little PC Gets the Big Stuff Wrong

Filed under
Hardware

washingtonpost.com: A small, light laptop makes an excellent second computer -- unless it costs more than your first. Hewlett Packard's $499-and-up 2133 Mini-Note comes from the same basic template as the Eee but falls woefully short in some aspects.

Mark Shuttleworth on the future of Ubuntu

Filed under
Interviews

lwn.net: The life of South African Mark Shuttleworth has been a kind of geek dream. Here, he talks to Glyn Moody about Ubuntu's new focus on the server side, why Ubuntu could switch from GNOME to KDE, and what happens to Ubuntu and its commercial arm, Canonical, if Shuttleworth were to fall out of a spaceship.

Mobile devices in GNU/Linux and GNOME

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: You have a computer (a laptop or a desktop). Since it’s a machine you use often and don’t tinker with much, it probably runs Linux. You also have a brand new digital camera, or a shiny new MP3 player. And you feel the dread: are those pure consumer oriented pieces of hardware compatible with my machine?

Sabayon Linux Partners with NetCraft Communications to Enhance Versiera's Support for Linux OS

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Press Release: Sabayon Linux today announced that it will partner with NetCraft Communications, a global provider of computer infrastructure management services and makers of Versiera, Remote System Management and Monitoring Software.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Firefox 3 'awesome bar' not awesome for all

  • My thoughts on the linux desktop
  • Tasty Tomato firmware for routers
  • One small lawsuit for Red Hat, One big legal step for open source
  • #ln -s /dev/null /dev/clue
  • Is Apache the Greatest Open Source Project?
  • EU Official Tells Governments to Go Open Source
  • Open source tour of Europe: Russia
  • Review: Asus Eee 900
  • Linux aternatives to Windows software roundup
  • Nokia urges Linux developers to learn business

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using chkconfig To Manage Linux Service Run Levels

  • Fedora 9 Nvidia
  • Short Tip: Searching files and packages
  • 5 easy steps to install Puppy Linux on your USB drive
  • Getting that wiki feeling on the desktop, part 2
  • Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Touchpad “Tap zones”
  • Timing processes in the shell
  • Finding "leaf" nodes on a file system
  • Installing Microsoft Fonts on openSUSE 11.0

Companies, Developers Contributing To The X Server

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Since our article yesterday entitled X Server 1.4.1 Is Released, No Joke it's sparked discussions on our forums and other online communities on how the X.Org release management can be improved and how new developers can become involved.

Also: Coming To A Desktop Near You: X.Org 7.4
And: X.Org Releases X Server 1.4.2

Linux kernel development talk

Filed under
Linux

kroah.com: Ever since my talk at OLS last year about the Linux kernel development community and the companies involved, I've been traveling around, giving the talk in one form or another to lots of different companies and community groups. Last week I gave the talk at Google, and they kindly recorded it and put it up for everyone to see.

Coming Tuesday, June 17th: Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: Whenever we’re asked “when is Firefox going to be released” we endeavor to answer to the best of our abilities, but the truth of the matter is that we’ll only ever ship “when it’s ready”. It is our expectation to ship Firefox 3 this upcoming Tuesday, June 17th.

Red Hat Makes History With Patent Settlement - Compatible with GPLv3

Filed under
Linux
Legal

groklaw.net: You've probably been wondering why I've been quiet, when there is news about a patent settlement between Red Hat and Firestar and DataTern in the JBoss litigation. It's because I wanted to be positive I was correct that this is the first known settlement involving patents that is harmonious with GPLv3. It is.

World's three most powerful supercomputers run SUSE

Filed under
SUSE

supercomputingonline.com: Supercomputers around the world are running on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server from Novell. According to TOP500, a project that tracks and detects trends in high-performance computing, SUSE Linux Enterprise is the Linux of choice on the world's largest HPC supercomputers today. Of the top 50 supercomputers worldwide, 40 percent are running on SUSE Linux Enterprise, including the top three.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support
    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch. The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.
  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support
    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support. Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.
  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.
  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.