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About Tux Machines

Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 'We Don't Get the Credit We Deserve' srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 10:27pm
Story Countdown to Mandriva 2011, Codename Announced srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 9:25pm
Story Firefox's Tablet UI Scheduled for Firefox 9 Integration srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 8:24pm
Story Lucid Lives: 10 Apps Still Updated for Ubuntu 10.04 srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 7:18pm
Story List of useful backup Utilities for Linux srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 7:15pm
Story About Mothers and Linux srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 7:14pm
Story What’s New in CentOS 6 srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 7:13pm
Story Linux Free Mega Games Pack srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 7:12pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04 by Canonical srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 7:10pm
Story Microsoft, world’s broadest supporter of Linux srlinuxx 19/08/2011 - 7:09pm

IBM's Handy on managing Linux

Filed under
Interviews

Scott Handy started with IBM 1983 as a systems engineer and went on to sales, marketing, and strategy positions covering large accounts, channels, small and medium business, and IBM products for Windows NT, Sun Solaris and OS/2 Warp. Now as VP of Worldwide Linux & Open Source for IBM he is one of the main public faces articulating IBM's open-source strategy.

Dell releases low-cost Linux desktops...in China

Filed under
Linux

Dell last week began selling low-cost Linux PCs to enterprise and consumer customers. They just have to be in China to get a hold of the machines.

How can I use audit to see who changed a file in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5?

Filed under
HowTos

When creating a security policy for a server, it is sometimes necessary to see if a file has been changed unexpectedly. Using tools such as md5sum will show that a file has changed, but will not show who changed the file. Using the audit subsystem, it is possible to track the process that was responsible for changing the file.

Organic interface design for GNOME

Filed under
Software

Interface design is a complex business. There are a great many schools of thought about how to build an effective interface, and ultimately no-one is 100% correct. Lots of theory, lots of academia, lots of opinion, but little hard evidence about what design constructs actually work best for general human-computer interaction.

SpaceNavigator: An affordable 3-D controller for Linux

Filed under
Hardware

3Dconnexion's SpaceNavigator is a compact, programmable USB input device designed for 3-D applications. It's a six-axis controller that senses tilt and rotation as well as x, y, and z linear motion.

Opera 9.2 Beta Released with Speed dial

Filed under
Software

Here's your first look at Speed Dial, a brand new way to get to your favorite sites. Speed Dial opens in any blank tab to give you immediate access to your favorite sites.

With each blank tab (New tab), Speed Dial presents a thumbnail preview of the top nine sites as selected by the user.

GPL 3 draft to be released today

Filed under
OSS

The second discussion draft of GPLv3 was released eight months ago, in July 2006. We had never planned to let so much time pass between public releases of the license. We felt it was important to fully discuss a few specific issues, including the recent patent deal between Novell and Microsoft, before proceeding with the process.

Oregon joins states considering open-source legislation

Filed under
OSS

Oregon has joined Texas, California and Minnesota as states that may vote this year on legislation that would mandate the use of open document formats for public documents and records.

New Linux Arrivals

Filed under
Ubuntu

You can almost set your watch by it nowadays: Twice a year, we have a new version of Ubuntu Linux to explore.

April will bring the release of Feisty Fawn, also known as Ubuntu 7.04. (The "04" indicates April; the "7" stands for 2007.) I've been running prerelease versions of Feisty for about a month. In a moment, some notes on what I've discovered. But first, a bit of context and history.

Installing desktop Linux

Filed under
Linux

It's funny how you can find yourself transported back, when faced with a set of stimuli. Pick up an old book, listen to a piece of music, or put on a jacket, and sometimes a wealth of memories and feelings can come rushing back. It can be slightly disorienting and it's not always pleasant, but for me at least, it never ceases to marvel.

How To Set Up suPHP On A Debian Based ISPConfig Server

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

With this guide I explain how to set up suPHP on a Debian based ISPConfig server with PHP 4. When you have configured suPHP on your ISPConfig server, you are able to run the PHP scripts under the admin user of the website instead of the Apache user.

The Lazy Guide to Installing Knoppix on a USB Key

Filed under
Howtos

Knoppix, the famous live Linux CD that practically started the live CD trend, needs no introduction to most people. One of the things that's so great about it is that you can take it with you and boot to a familiar Linux environment on almost any modern computer, without touching the OS that's already installed on it.

Myah OS 3 Tech Demo 1

Filed under
Linux

I'm proud to announce the availability of Myah OS 3 Tech Demo 1. This is the first test version for Myah OS generation 3. This is simply a live CD showing off the the base system. Myah OS is no longer based or related to any existing linux system. All packages have been compiled by me from build scripts I have written. Myah is now a i686 system.

Controversy Swirls Around Changes in GPLv3

Filed under
OSS

As the Free Software Foundation prepares to release the third discussion draft on the GNU General Public License on March 28, the question being asked is whether the move to block future deals like the controversial one between Microsoft and Novell will forever doom the license.

Ubuntu 7.04 Beta - upgrading the video card

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Gigabyte nVidia GeForce 7600GS card came in the mail today, delivered from Newegg via UPS. And just like I'd threatened earlier, I replaced rhea's 9600 with it. When I pulled out the older video card I re-discovered it wasn't a regular 9600, it was a 9600SE. That's a low-end budget card with a 64-bit memory interface introduced in 2003 that I purchased in 2005 on sale.

SabayonLinux 3.3 Mini on that HP Laptop

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Given the growing popularity of SabayonLinux, my continued bad luck with it1, and the fact that my dvdburner died this past weekend, I decided to test the newly released Sabayon Linux 3.3 Mini.

Ulteo the world's easiest linux

Filed under
News

Gael Duval, the creator of Mandrake (now Mandriva) and now fired from its own company, has recently released the Ulteo project.

Read more here: http://linux.go2linux.org/node/45

ODF group a year old, but format still unproven

Filed under
OSS

Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary of the ODF Alliance, an international group of organizations dedicated to promoting Open Document format for XML (ODF) as an international standard for document formats.

How late could the GPLv3 be?

Filed under
OSS

It's been over two years now since the Free Software Foundation (FSF) started seriously working on revising that key open-source license, the GPL (Gnu General Public License). On March 28, we're finally going to get... the next draft. How late could the final release of the GPLv3 be?

Mid-2007? At least. Late 2007? Quite likely. 2008? Could be. 2010!? I wouldn't be surprised.

Red Hat should lighten up

Filed under
Linux

When I learned that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, which is a big release for Red Hat I've been looking forward to for some time, was coming out on March 14, one of the first thoughts that crossed my mind was, "Great—when's CentOS 5 coming out?"

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.