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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

GPLv3 is officially open source

CBR: The Open Source Initiative's chairman, Michael Tiemann, announced Friday that the organization's licensing board have officially approve the version three of the General Public License and Lesser General Public License as OSI-approved.

IBM adds heft to OpenOffice open-source project

Filed under
OOo

cnet: IBM said on Monday that it will join the OpenOffice.org project and pledged to further use the open-source software in its own products.

Care to Ubuntu? Part 3

Filed under
Ubuntu

mitchelaneous.com: To continue from where I left off previously, my installation of Ubuntu’s Feisty Fawn (7.04) has been full of nothing but pleasant surprises. Granted, not all applications/software/games will work on Ubuntu….yet. But thanks to some clever people over at the Wine project, that is soon to be a thing of the past.

Windows, Linux vie for honours

Filed under
Linux

australianit.news.com: THE energy efficiency battle between Linux and Windows is intensifying, with each claiming to be better at cutting power consumption and avoiding environmental damage.

AMD: GPU Specifications Without NDAs!

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: This morning at the X Developer Summit in the United Kingdom, Matthew Tippett and John Bridgman of AMD have announced that they will be releasing their ATI GPU specifications without any Non-Disclosure Agreements needed by the developers!

Audio Editing Freedom - An introduction to Audacity

Filed under
Software

raiden's realm: Audacity is a sound editing program that puts the freedom to create into the hands of the user. It is a vital tool for audiophiles everywhere who love to record, mix and edit their own music or sound files, and for the average joe who just wants to do a little audio editing.

How to give your low-end Canon digital camera RAW support

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you have a point-and-click digital camera made by Canon, you may be able to turn on all sorts of features usually reserved for more expensive SLRs. That includes live histograms, depth-of-field calculation, under and overexposure highlighting, and -- best of all -- shooting your pictures in RAW. The secret is CHDK, an enhanced, free software replacement firmware.

Windows, Linux, OS X User Interfaces: All Fluff, No Function

Filed under
OS

OSWeekly: I have been wondering about this for sometime now - what defines a professional looking UI for an operating system? Each OS platform has its strengths and weaknesses. But what has me concerned is how each of the three platforms appear to have taken such a fancy to its UI so much that other important features seem to have taken a backseat.

Video Surveillance With ZoneMinder On Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

ZoneMinder is the top Linux video camera security and surveillance solution. In this document I will cover how to get ZoneMinder up and running on Ubuntu 6.06.1 LTS or Dapper Drake with the recent updates included.

The March of the penguin

Filed under
Linux

dailycamera.com: Shopping for a home computer involves more than just choosing hardware — buyers must also pick what kind of operating system they want to run that new machine. And for most people, that's long meant choosing between Microsoft's Windows, which runs on PCs, or OS, the system that operates Apple's Macintosh. Enter Linux.

Benchmarking the MD3000 powervault under linux

Filed under
Hardware

broadband reports: I've been spending some time benchmarking the Dell MD-3000 powervault storage array under SuSE 10.2 x86_64 linux. It is ok for the price we paid (half retail), but this storage array, with the guts of an old IBM DS4100 which had an anemic 485 MB/sec internal bus speed, is not able to max out the total sequential read or write performance of the 15 disks it is able to contain.

Installing eAccelerator on mod_php

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: PHP is an interpreted language. That unfortunately means that every time a client requests a PHP page from your site, the PHP interpreter has to re-read the script and compile it on the fly before it is run. It can be beneficial to use a PHP caching system to shave some time off the pageload.

openSUSE 10.3 Beta 3 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

Welp, we're in the homestretch now. Beta 3 of openSUSE 10.3 was released a few days ago, and with only one more developmental release before final, we were hoping things were starting to shape up. This release doesn't bring too many surprises or any new eye candy, but most subsystems are stablizing. With 587 MB of changes, developers are homing in on their goal.

John Carmack not as interested in Linux (and OpenGL?)

Filed under
Gaming

beyond3d.com: A german publication has posted an interview with Todd Hollenshead, id Software's CEO, that reveals id Software and John Carmack are no longer as committed to Linux as they have been.

Disable Syntax Highlighting in Vim

Filed under
HowTos

howto geek: I'm the type of geek that always has an open ssh session connected to my servers, but ever since I switched to using a Mac running OS X, I noticed a huge annoyance in my terminal… the syntax highlighting makes it impossible to read the files I'm trying to edit.

80% on Novell

Filed under
SUSE

matt asay: OK, so sometimes I'm wrong. Miguel de Icaza called out an error I made in criticizing Novell for its open-source strategy. I admit that I find it hard to see beyond Novell's patent pact with Microsoft but, as Miguel pointed out in a string of emails between us today, this leaves out a lot that Novell does well.

Vector Linux 5.8 on 450Mhz K6-2, 256Mb

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress.com: In a lot of the same ways I liked Wolvix, I like Vector Linux. On the other hand, there’s enough that’s different that I probably won’t keep it. Part of that might be a sophomore slump having just seen Wolvix in action: It’s a hard act to follow.

2.4.36-pre1, Preventing NULL Dereferences

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "In private discussions, Solar Designer proposed to restrict the ability to map the NULL address to CAP_RAW_IO capable processes only. The idea behind this was to prevent 'normal' users from trying to exploit NULL dereferences in the kernel which have not been discovered yet."

Paterva Evolution is dead, long live Maltego

Filed under
Software

linux.com: As noted in the update to our review of Paterva Evolution, a personal data mining tool, Roelof Temmingh has removed the binaries for the application after having received legal threats over its use. In an email on the Paterva announcement's mailing list over the weekend, Temmingh revealed more about why the binaries had to be removed and unveiled his plans for future work on the project.

Chuck Norris Week on Ubuntu Forums

Filed under
Ubuntu

Motho ke motho ka botho: For the next week, most (if not all) of the UF.org staff have transmogrified into miniature renditions of everyone’s favorite superhuman being, Chuck Norris.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)