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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux kernel: The battle of the CPU schedulers

Filed under
Linux

Since some time already, different patches are being written for the Linux kernel, which improve the CPU scheduler. The CPU scheduler, is that part of the kernel, that's responsible for assigning CPU time to the different task running on your system.

Art of Illusion 3-D graphics studio for Linux, Mac and Windows

Filed under
Software

Art of Illusion (AOI) is a 3-D graphics studio that provides modeling, texturing, animation, and rendering in a single program. It is designed to be easy to use so that new users can pick it up quickly, while still providing advanced features to let experienced users create professional-quality artwork.

Getting DNS information with dig

Filed under
HowTos

There exists a neat little tool in Unix command line toolbox called dig. The dig tool is designed to allow you to pull up DNS information and can be useful if you’re having network problems, or messing around with your DNS.

Blue Belle: Running PCLinuxOS Test 4

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Reviews

PCLinuxOS is an up-and-coming distribution that recently made it into Distrowatch.com's list of Top Ten Distributions. I installed PCLinuxOS Test 4 on a 10 GB partition (with a separate 1 GB /home partition) on an AMD Athlon 2600+ with 640 MB of RAM and an NVIDIA GeForce 6200 LE graphics card. This hardware is no great shakes nowadays, but it's plenty fast enough to run PCLinuxOS with all the bells and whistles.

My Week in Linux: Video and Games

Filed under
Linux

One of my long standing issues with moving to Linux was trying to find a suitable video conversion application for my Cowon D2. It had to churn out suitable files and let me transfer them without booting into Windows. I tried, and failed, many times to find a solution to this problem, and was content to just boot Windows from time to time.

NVIDIA GeForce 8500GT 256MB

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

The GeForce 8500GT is NVIDIA's value-priced contender in the GeForce 8 series. The 8500GT has a 450MHz core clock and 400MHz memory clock, but how is this $100 creation able to compete against other graphics cards from ATI and NVIDIA?

Staying on Top of Your Memory Usage in Linux

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HowTos

Many people notice that after using a computer for a long period of time, that their system might start to slow down; programs open up or respond slower, web browsers seem sluggish, and the computer seems to all but slow to a crawl. Experienced users will recognize that this occurrence is due to limited free memory or RAM on the system.

New Linux Does Inclusive Virtualization

Filed under
Linux

The second Linux kernel release of 2007 is now available, further extending the virtualization and real-time capabilities of Linux.

Highlighting the Linux 2.6.21 update is the inclusion of the paravirt-ops paravirtualization interface, which enables multiple hypervisors to hook directly into Linux.

Debain WrEtch: review of an UnAmerican Linux system

Filed under
Humor

Debain is the only group of software developers who still believe that Richard Stallman invented programming. Everyone else now correctly credits Bill Gates for doing so. Debain developers hold themselves separate from the rest of the Linux community because of their pride in not stealing from other operating systems to build their version of Linux.

Microsoft To Release Silverlight To Open Source Community

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Microsoft

Microsoft Corporation may release part of the source code of its Silverlight technology to the open source community.

Compiz On Solaris X86 - Eye Candy For Solaris’s Desktop

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Software

Want to have all that eye candy (desktop coolness) that we have on Linux on your Solaris box. It is still little rough on edges, but it is coming there slowly. Guess soon Solrais will have as stable packages available as there are for Linux distributions.

OpenOffice.org Calc function tools

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OOo
HowTos

Once you are comfortable with inputting functions and formulas, the next step is to learn how to automate the processes. Calc includes over half a dozen tools to help you manipulate functions and formulas, ranging from features for copying and reusing data to creating subtotals automatically to ones for varying information to help you find the answers that you need.

Spreading opportunity

Filed under
OLPC
OSS

Growing up in Keizer, Justin Gallardo and Michael Burns learned about computers by taking them apart to see how they worked and by doing triage when their machines crashed.

Now the 20-year-old computer science majors at Oregon State University are working to ensure that children in developing countries have that same opportunity.

Your Momma Uses Linux

Filed under
Linux

Those of us who grew up in the seventies probably remember variations of this pejorative phrase. often aimed at either the schoolyard bully, or perhaps your best friend in jest. There was often no additional descriptor: just the first two words hanging there. The implication that your mother was... something left undescribed...

Gran Paradiso Alpha 4 Available for Testing

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Moz/FF

Gran Paradiso Alpha 4 is now available for testing. New features in this development milestone of Mozilla Firefox 3 include the FUEL JavaScript library for extension developers, a redesigned Page Info window, improvements to offline application support and Gecko 1.9 bug fixes.

“I don’t know what Linux is but I don’t like it”

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Linux

In college, almost everyone has a personal computer. More and more people are using Macs - it seems that 10% of the class of 2007 uses Macs, whereas it appears that roughly half of freshman (class of 2010) are using Macs. I’ve used PCs, Macs, and lately a lot of Linux. I’ve even written my own operating system.

Free, Open, Eating Its Young

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OSS

The FOSS (Free/Open Source Software) world is cram-full of interesting, smart, fun people. It's also full of trolls, jerks, and abusive wastes of time, and very confused when it comes to civility. A lot of FOSSers fall into the Five Geek Social Fallacies trap, especially the first two:

Geek Social Fallacy #1: Ostracizers Are Evil

XO laptop is fun for child's play

Filed under
OLPC

The hardest thing about learning to use the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) project's XO notebook PC is finding the right way to twist its antenna ears and open the display. Once you can see the screen, just follow the icons to write a note, snap a photo, or compose a tune.

Linux: Releasing With Known Regressions

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Linux

Following the release announcement of the 2.6.21 Linux kernel, Adrian Bunk noted that he no longer planned to track regressions. He explained, "if we would take 'no regressions' seriously, it might take 4 or 5 months between releases due to the lack of developer manpower for handling regressions.

The real tune on real time Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Generally, I’m a fan of taking the high road. I’d much rather talk about what we do than talk about what the competition is doing. But sometimes you can’t let things slide…

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more