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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 23 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 8:48am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 8:40am
Story Document Exchange: The World Has Changed, Billy srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 5:46am
Story KNOPPIX 6.7.0 Delivers a Few Surprises srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 5:43am
Story The wonders of the shell srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 5:42am
Story Karen Sandler: Freedom from my heart to the desktop srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 1:08am
Story Keith Curtis to make "Software Wars" movie srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 1:05am
Story The Linus effect srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 1:00am
Story How To Cut Your Linux PC’s Boot Time in Half With E4rat srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 9:29pm
Story A newbie’s report on Kubuntu srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 9:27pm

Mozilla now serving Firefox updates’ betas

Filed under
HowTos

Mozilla announced the Mozilla Community Beta Program, which have started pushing Firefox updates release candidates to users who have previously downloaded a beta version.

Screencasting with Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Many times a simple screencast showing how to do something by using a series of screenshots in sequence in a video can explain what paragraph after paragraph of words cannot. Linux and a few open source applications make the job of creating such screencasts easy.

The Ubuntu Experience, Part 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

PC World recently did a feature article on Operating Systems, and named Ubuntu as their favorite Linux distribution. I decided to document my experience working with Ubuntu, and this second article, Part 2, will detail my experience installing and using applications. I'm using the latest version of Ubuntu, 6.1.

Installing More Applications

The when, why, and how of backing up

Filed under
News

To protect your AIX system, you need to have a solid backup strategy, multiple backups, offsite storage of data, and a fully tested and proven plan of restoring data to your systems. Having a solid backup strategy decreases downtime.

Free at Last

Filed under
Linux

This rant isn't about silver at all; we figure once or twice a year we're entitled to a tirade of a different color (although in a strange way this one is connected to silver, too, because silver bulls by their very definition are a contrary lot).

Cool Tool: Drop-down terminal for Linux

Filed under
Software

If you've been running Linux for a few years (from before all the clever point-and-click stuff was added to the Linux desktop) you probably find yourself regularly having to open a terminal window to issue a couple of commands to get things working properly.

Ian Murdock: Debian "missing a big opportunity"

Filed under
Interviews

Ian Murdock founded Debian GNU/Linux nearly fifteen years ago, and today it provides the foundations for many well-known distros such as Ubuntu and Knoppix. LXF caught up with Ian, who currently chairs the Linux Standards base, and asked him about Debian politics, leadership and the rise of Ubuntu...

LXF: How happy are you with how Debian has turned out?

Armed with open source

Filed under
OSS

Open source technologies already permeate most data centers, and their influence is spreading. However, data center managers who wouldn't think twice about dropping a new Linux server into a rack feel very differently about building an open source firewall as the main barrier between their own network and the great unwashed. Security remains outside the open-source comfort zone.

Linux adoption presents challenges to commercial suppliers

Filed under
Linux

Recently published research by Venture Development Corporation (VDC; Natick, MA, USA; www.vdc-corp.com) indicates increasing adoption of Linux in embedded system-development projects.

To Ubuntu or to Kubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Within four days, I’ve reformatted my hard drive and installed Ubuntu and Kubuntu in quick successions…twice. So that’s a total of four Linux installations in four days. Once again, I was haunted by the ghost of indecision. Should I go for Ubuntu with the clean, minimalistic Gnome, or embrace Kubuntu with the fancy, aesthetic KDE?

n/a

Network Monitoring With ntop

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

ntop is a network traffic tools that shows network usage in a real time. One of the good things about this tool is that you can use a web browser to manage and navigate through ntop traffic information to better understand network status.

http://www.howtoforge.com/network_monitoring_with_ntop

A month with KDE

Filed under
KDE

Last month I wrote a piece saying that I was going to try KDE for a month (I’m a big GNOME fan!) and then report back on my experiences. I must admit I’m feeling relieved to be back with GNOME as I never really felt comfortable with KDE, but that’s not to say it was all bad.

Linux and High-Performance Computing

Filed under
Linux

High-performance computing (HPC) has moved from the domain of government and academic laboratories to being an essential component of the design process. Today, it is almost unthinkable to develop the key components of a car, airplane or even many consumer products without computer-assisted structural or impact analysis.

Import mail into Gmail with the Gmail Loader

Filed under
HowTos

So, you've turned your back on traditional mail clients and get your mail fix via Gmail these days. The only problem is getting to all those old message that are stuck in your old email client. One way to stuff that old mail into your shiny and capacious Gmail account is to use Mark Lyon's Gmail Loader.

MINIX: what is it, and why is it still relevant?

Filed under
Interviews

MINIX, as originated by Andy Tanenbaum, is an operating system that has its roots and heart in academia as a tool that teaches you how kernels really should work. Recently, however, with the advent of version three of this rock solid OS, the focus is on making a production ripe embedded distribution.

Is Red Hat Ready to Be the Next Microsoft?

Filed under
Linux

Much like Microsoft's influence over software developers in the 1990s, Red Hat has seemingly rallied all of the major open source application providers to support the company's forthcoming online store--known as the Red Hat Exchange.

An introduction to the XMMS2 package

Filed under
HowTos

Over the past few years I've used the venerable XMMS application for playing back all my audio content. After reading recently that this project has been mothballed, seeing no future updates, I decided to try the successor project XMMS2. Here's how I got on.

It's Channel Time For Linux

Filed under
Linux

A new wave of emerging Linux application providers are doubling and even tripling their channel investments this year as they move to take Linux from a cult status relegated to business niches to a mainstream end-to-end solution stack.

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KDevelop 5.0.0 release

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Create modular server-side Java apps direct from mvn modules with diet4j instead of an app server

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