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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Why there are over 2 dozen music players

Filed under
Software

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: People often groan when they hear of someone making another game of Tetris, Window Manager, or audio program. After all, people ask, “Do we really need another? Why can’t you just contribute to fixing annoying bug X in gTetris/KDE/xmms?” I’ve always been on the side of the argument that said - “So what! But why create another?

The LXF Test: Hands on with Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux

linuxformat.co.uk: Fedora 10 has just been released to the waiting masses. Andy Hudson takes the distro for an early test run, exploring the new features and seeing how it stacks up against the other major players in the Linux league...

Also: Upgrading to the newest Fedora release

More Ubuntu Kung Fu

Filed under
Ubuntu

lifehacker.com: Say hey again to Keir Thomas, author of the new book Ubuntu Kung Fu, who stopped by to share some more of the best material from the book, in a follow-up to his post, Some Productive Ubuntu Kung Fu.

Migrating to Linux in a business or large user environment

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Every once in a while we see discussions on the method and manner of migrating from one Operating System to Linux.

Martin's hidden blog ;-)

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Hopefully Martin won't get upset because of this post, but reading Changelogs is sometimes funnier, bolder and more informative than reading a blog!

No accounting software for Linux?

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com/Murphy: There is no OSS accounting… solutions worth a hoot. This is the main reason we still run so many Windows machines in the office. Of course this is the main drawback of any OSS adoption. There is a serious lack of good applications.

Yet Another "10 Useful Forefox Extensions"

Filed under
Moz/FF

YATS, Yet Another Technology Site: You have read such posts again & again... So read Yet Another!

Clone/Back Up/Restore OpenVZ VMs With vzdump

Filed under
HowTos

vzdump is a backup and restore utility for OpenVZ VMs. This tutorial shows how you can use it to clone/back up/restore virtual machines with vzdump.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Gentoo recruiting randomness

  • Switching from FrontPage to KompoZer
  • Red Hat offers Linux-wary Unix shops long-term support in Japan
  • 8,000 TuxTop models and counting
  • Collaborative Effort Helps Linux "Distros" Obtain IPv6 Certification
  • Can adoption of GNU/Linux help recession?
  • Linux hops on STD bus
  • Open source Untangle guard union's privacy
  • Are you sure you don’t just want to use Ubuntu?
  • DataForm adds efficient input to OpenOffice.org Calc
  • Disney using Drupal
  • Interview with Dustin Kirkland: Ubuntu Server Developer
  • Is the era of open source legal stupidity over?
  • The problem with dual licensing
  • One More Reason for Linux Lovers to Give Thanks
  • Thumbs up for Ubuntu 8.10
  • Robotic arm runs Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Get to the root of Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Prelinking
  • OOo: Simple Labels
  • Installing PHP cairo wrapper under Mandriva 2009.0
  • Building an OpenBSD Gateway - Part 2
  • Debug your shell scripts with bashdb
  • password protect OpenOffice.org documents
  • Check Package Dependencies with apt-rdepends on Ubuntu
  • Better Firefox in KDE4
  • Minimize All Your Applications To The System Tray In Ubuntu
  • Receive Large Files with Droopy
  • Getting Started with Linux
  • Vi mode in bash

What’s a Document?

redmonk.com: One of the most interesting byproducts of the transition, fully underway around the world, to XML based document formats from binary alternatives, is the ability to treat the asset as a container of items rather than a discrete item itself.

Acer Aspire One netbook - Almost Perfect

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

pcworld.com: Now that I've been using my Acer Aspire One laptop for two weeks I can share a few more thoughts about it. Do I still love the laptop? Most assuredly. Have I discovered some small areas for improvement? Yes, that too.

Photo Management on Linux - Part 1

Filed under
Software

community.zdnet: There are a number of different photo management programs available for Linux - more than I have either the time or interest to look at, honestly - and of course different versions of Linux have different programs available. I'll try to give a brief overview of both of these areas.

The evolution of a Linux user

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Not everyone who uses Linux today has done so because of carefully reasoning that it is a better operating system than the others on offer. People enter the Linux fold due to different reasons and those who stay there go through several stages of growth.

Novell vs. Red Hat: Read the Linux Fine Print

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: Novell today claimed to have more certified software partners than rival Linux providers. Novell’s chest pumping represents a thinly veiled attack against Red Hat. But take a closer look.

Also: Novell needs a recount: Red Hat still leads in certified applications

Closed Linux driver problems described

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: Binary-only Linux drivers will never work for the majority of Linux users, Harald Welte told hardware developers at a Taipei conference. The Linux kernel's lack of an ABI and intentional lack of stable APIs make binary drivers a losing battle.

Ubuntu 8.10: Featureless Ibex?

Filed under
Ubuntu

theunixgeek.blogspot: A few days after Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex was released, I decided to give it a test drive in my trial of VMware Fusion. I was hoping for an awesome new experience, but I got just a Featureless Ibex.

Replacing high-end Unix with enterprise Linux? Not so fast

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: Migrating from high-end Unix-based systems to commodity x86/Linux platforms has been a popular idea for the last few years, at least in theory. But it turns out that not everyone thinks going full-on with Linux is the best solution -- at least not yet.

Killer open source monitoring tools

Filed under
Software

infoworld.com: In the real estate world, the mantra is location, location, location. In the network and server administration world, the mantra is visibility, visibility, visibility. If you don't know what your network and servers are doing at every second of the day, you're flying blind.

Audioplayers are easy, right?

Filed under
Software

the-gay-bar.com: I love music. When I moved to Linux I started out with XMMS, a WinAmp Clone, no surprises there, things worked as I was used to. Along came the "Library based" players that offered so much more.

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More in Tux Machines

Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Phone - With Android

I ever so slightly regret the "upgrade" to Android. With a version less than the tablet, the UI changes are extremely noticeable, and the transition isn't as smooth. The device lags, and it just doesn't have enough processing power to give the necessary feel of goodness and elegance. On the other hand, you get tons of native applications that you can actually use, as opposed to the Ubuntu Touch idea. Shame really. For 'tis a compromise. If you ask me, I wholeheartedly embrace the M10 tablet upgrade, but on the phone, you might as well keep Ubuntu unless you need the device for serious use. If it's just an opportunistic call/SMS thing for when abroad and such, or to loan to friends, the original combo is adequate. If you need apps, then Android is the way to go, but do not except any miracles. It won't be speedy, and it won't be too pretty. All in all, an okay player. It is silly attaching sentiments to software or hardware, but I do guess I will fondly remember the Ubuntu phone attempt as a noble idea to make something great and fun. I could have kept the device in its original state, perhaps, but in the end, it would have ended in a pile of ancient stuff you keep around for a decade until you decide you need to throw it away to leave room for fresh memories and less ancient stuff. Having a flawless Android experience would have helped soften the edge, but as it is, it remains the bittersweet attempt at what could have been a revolution. The end. Read more Also: Ubuntu Desktop weekly update – February 23, 2018

​Docker and Red Hat News

  • ​Docker has a business plan headache
    We love containers. And, for most of us, containers means Docker. As RightScale observed in its RightScale 2018 State of the Cloud report, Docker's adoption by the industry has increased to 49 percent from 35 percent in 2017.
  • Mycroft Widget, Atos and Red Hat's New Cloud Container Solution, npm Bug and More
    Atos and Red Hat announced this morning "a new fully-managed cloud container solution - Atos Managed OpenShift (AMOS) - built on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform". The press release adds, "Because AMOS is built on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a container-centric hybrid cloud solution, it can deliver the flexibility customers seek from cloud-native and container-based applications."
  • Red Hat Decision Manager 7 Boosts BPM with Low-Code Approach
    Red Hat is perhaps best known for its Enterprise Linux platform, but it has been a player in the Business Process Management (BPM) suite for over a decade too. On Feb. 21, Red Hat Decision Manager 7 was officially announced as the successor to the company's JBoss Business Rules Management System (BRMS) product. Red Hat first released BRMS back in May 2009 which itself was an evolution of the JBoss Rules Engine.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Active Stock Evaluation

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.