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Tuesday, 23 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu Server Edition At Wikipedia: Where’s the Revenue?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: First, the good news for Canonical and its loyal followers: Yes, Wikimedia Foundation (the company behind Wikipedia) is embracing Ubuntu on its servers in a big way. It sounds like there really isn’t much — if any — money flowing from Wikipedia to Canonical.

Firefox 3.1 beta 1 released and reviewed

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: Mozilla has released Firefox 3.1 Beta 1, the first official development release of the next update to Firefox 3 just about four months after its release past June.

Linux Standards Base 4.0 Beta Released

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org: In another step towards general release, the first beta of Linux Standard Base (LSB) 4.0 was released today. LSB 4.0 will introduce a new application checker, a new shell script checker, and a new multi-version software development kit (SDK) that will enable developers to build applications to earlier LSB specifications without changing SDKs.

Dell teams with Red Hat on open source

Filed under
Linux

vnunet.com: Red hat and Dell have announced an alliance that will see the systems giant offer the new midrange Red Hat Application Appliance.

Linux Vendors Increase Security Features

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: Red Hat, Canonical and Novell are enhancing the security features in their Fedora, Ubuntu and OpenSUSE Linux distributions, which all are slated for release later this year.

15 Tips For a Better Linux Experience

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: The beauty of Linux is in users ability to do large amount of customization to have a unique user expereince. So today we will look in to some tips for a “better” Linux experience.

Microsoft cleared to commit code to Apache

Filed under
Software

cnet.com: Few will have noticed, but Microsoft's Jim Kellerman just announced that he and a Microsoft colleague "been cleared to contribute patches again" to Apache, and specifically to the Hadoop project.

Firefox 3.1 Beta 1 Now Available for Download, First Look

Filed under
Moz/FF

lifehacker.com: Mozilla has just pushed out Firefox 3.1 Beta 1 to their servers, marking the first major step toward the official 3.1 release. Luckily we've already covered a lot of the features you can expect, so hit the jump for a closer look at what Firefox 3.1 Beta 1 brings to the table.

Big things come in TinyMe

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: I take a sort of sick joy in using a computer as long as possible, so I've become interested in lightweight Linux distributions like TinyMe 2008.0 that help prolong the life of a computer.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Run your virtual OS directly from GDM in Ubuntu

  • Using EasyUbuntu
  • One Linux Formatting Tip I Bet You Didn’t Know
  • How to add Ubuntu 8.04 to win server 2003 Active Directory Domain
  • Let PAM take care of GNU/Linux security for you
  • Turning off automatic gnome-session

OpenOffice 3 Is Here. Can You Tell?

Filed under
OOo
  • First Look: OpenOffice 3.0 Improves Support for Microsoft File Formats

  • OpenOffice 3 Is Here. Can You Tell?
  • OpenOffice.org 3.0 breaks through 390,000 downloads in a day
  • 8 Reasons Why OpenOffice 3.0 Could Be The Tipping Point Application (or not?)
  • Getting The Word Out About OpenOffice.org 3
  • Reasons for the non-adoption of OpenOffice.org in a data-intensive public administration

Krusader: one file manager to rule them all

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I don’t like KDE4. I don’t like the Dolphin file manager either. But those dislikes are proportional to my concern about the future of Konqueror. Then, I discovered Krusader.

Stupid Firefox Tricks, Part I

Filed under
Moz/FF

earthweb.com: Firefox ... we use it all day, for everything from managing finances to socializing to playing games. But it's a large and complicated programs. Are you getting the most out of your browser?

Searching with GNOME Do

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: One of my favourite applications for Mac OS X is Launchbar, an indispensable application-launching utility. Now, on Linux, a similar application is available, called GNOME Do.

Sapphire Radeon HD 4870 Toxic Vapor-X

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Today we are looking at the Sapphire Radeon HD 4870 Toxic, which takes the original Radeon HD 4870 to the next level with heightened frequencies and an exclusive Vapor-X cooling solution.

Browser Review: Mozilla Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

practicalecommerce.com: By some estimates, more than 1.4 billion people use the Internet for work, entertainment, or commerce. All of those web surfers must use a browser to visit websites or shop at online stores, and if browsing speed, security, and functionality matter, those users should be cruising the information super highway with the Mozilla Firefox 3 web browser.

What's new in OpenOffice 3?

Filed under
OOo
  • What's new in OpenOffice 3?

  • OOo: Thoughts about the importance of Extensions
  • Installing OpenOffice.org 3.0
  • How to Install OpenOffice.org 3.0 on Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex
  • OpenOffice.org 3.0 launch overwhelms servers

Linux games - First Person Shooters - Part Deux

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: It's time for some more fast-paced action! Today, we'll talk about games where you play as a human - against other humans. Our two candidates are AssaultCube and Urban Terror.

Moonlight - what’s the big deal?

Filed under
Software

ericsbinaryworld.com: Hardly a day goes by that I don’t see an article on Linux Today about Moonlight and what a horrible person Miguel de Icaza is. So I thought I’d go ahead and do some exploration of what’s going on with Moonlight and Silverlight.

My FOSS Graphic Application WishList

Filed under
Software

penguinpetes.com: There's a number of new graphics applications that I've been searching all over for. They may or may not have been invented yet. So I'm posting this little list, to the purpose of either...

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Says Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Will Come with Boot Speed Boost

Canonical's Will Cooke published a new Ubuntu Desktop newsletter today to inform the community on the development progress of the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system. Besides various improvements for the GNOME desktop environment, the Ubuntu Desktop team over at Canonical recently started to investigate the boot speed of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, planning to give it another boost by using systemd’s latest features to do some profiling, which will help them identify any issues that might cause slow boot up time. Read more Also: Canonical Pulls Intel's Spectre Update from Ubuntu Repos Due to Hardware Issues

Intel's "Utter Garbage" Code Bricks and Delays Linux, Torvalds Furious

today's leftovers

  • 20 Years of LWN
    Back in mid-1997, your editor (Jonathan Corbet) and Liz Coolbaugh were engaged in a long-running discussion on how to trade our nice, stable, reliably paying jobs for a life of uncertainty, poverty, and around-the-clock work. Not that we thought of it in those terms, naturally. We eventually settled on joining Red Hat's nascent "support partner" program; while we were waiting for it to get started, we decided to start a weekly newsletter as a side project — not big and professional like the real press — to establish ourselves in the community. Thus began an amazing journey that has just completed its 20th year. After some time thinking about what we wanted to do and arguing about formats, we published our first edition on January 22, 1998. It covered a number of topics, including the devfs controversy, the pesky 2GB file-size limit on the ext2 filesystem, the use of Linux on Alpha to render scenes in the film "Titanic", the fact that Red Hat had finally hired a full-time quality-assurance person and launched the Red Hat Advanced Development Labs, and more. We got almost no feedback on this issue, though, perhaps because we didn't tell anybody that we had created it.
  •  
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.4 | Ubuntu 17.10 Revisited
    Canonical revised Ubuntu 17.10 with the new 17.10.1. Time to take another look…
  • PodCTL #22 – Highway to Helm
    One of the reasons that Kubernetes has gained so much traction in the marketplace is because it is flexible enough to allow innovation to happen all around the core APIs. One area where that has happened is in application package management, specifically with the Helm project.
  • LibreELEC Linux OS Will Get Meltdown and Spectre Patches with Next Major Release
    The development team behind the Kodi-based LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source HTPC operating system for embedded systems and PCs released LibreELEC 8.2.3. LibreELEC 8.2.3 is the third maintenance update to the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series of the Just enough Operating System (JeOS), which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center. It's here a month after the LibreELEC 8.2.2 point release to address a few issues.
  • openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week
    The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26. The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3. “We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”
  • French Gender-Neutral Translation for Roundcube
    Here's a quick blog post to tell the world I'm now doing a French gender-neutral translation for Roundcube.
  •  
  • This Oil Major Has a Supercomputer the Size of a Soccer Field
    Big Oil is now Big Tech. So big, in fact, that Eni SpA’s new supercomputer is the size of a soccer field. In the multimillion-dollar pursuit of the world’s most powerful computers, the Italian explorer says it’s taken the lead. Its new machine, located outside Milan, will scan for oil and gas reservoirs deep below the Earth over thousands of miles. “This is where the company’s heart is, where we hold our most delicate data and proprietary technology,” Eni Chief Executive Officer Claudio Descalzi said in an interview on Thursday.

Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash