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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Latest Distro Trying For Commercial Success Uses Arch & Wayland Rianne Schestowitz 05/07/2014 - 5:42pm
Story Wine 1.7.21 released Rianne Schestowitz 05/07/2014 - 5:37pm
Story Two Months & Counting, LGP Remains Offline Rianne Schestowitz 05/07/2014 - 5:16pm
Story Cutelyst 0.2.0 Released: A Web Framework Powered By Qt 5 Rianne Schestowitz 05/07/2014 - 4:59pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 05/07/2014 - 12:25pm
Story Lennart: The State & Future Of Systemd Roy Schestowitz 05/07/2014 - 7:47am
Story More NSA Fallout, Linux Time Warp, and the Ultimate OS Roy Schestowitz 05/07/2014 - 7:45am
Blog entry Tux Machines is 10 Rianne Schestowitz 3 05/07/2014 - 5:03am
Story HTC One M8 Prime to release with Android 5.0 L OS in October-December Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 10:40pm
Story Open source to help Wales protect environment Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 9:58pm

Running a GNU/Linux desktop on the web with Ulteo

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Is it possible to develop full GNU/Linux desktops that run on the web and can therefore be accessed from anywhere? We already have a flavour of this with web-based services such as Google’s Gmail, Google Docs and online storage space but these are run from the user’s own desktop and are restricted to bespoke services. What about full desktops? Enter Ulteo, created by Gael Duval.

Phoronix Test Suite 1.0.0

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: It's been a lot of work -- over the past few months especially -- though we've reached our initial goal in formalizing and releasing our internal test tools and at the same time developing a feature-rich platform. In this article we'll highlight some of what is already possible with Phoronix Test Suite 1.0.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Can open source help liberate the bureaucracy?

  • Future of FLOSS password storages: combined solution soon?
  • The Mismanagement of One Laptop Per Child.
  • Cheap Mobil Computing
  • Mark Shuttleworth: People do research to win customers, not to file patents
  • KDE Everywhere
  • Sourceforge: Vote for your favorite open source projects
  • 'Duke Nukem Forever' Gameplay Video
  • Hands on with the Ubuntu Netbook Remix
  • Top video capture/editing software
  • What I think of the manifesto b...s...
  • Will Linux force Microsoft to give XP Pro more life?
  • Linux Outlaws 41 - Now with File Retention Technology
  • The 10 Best Linus Torvalds Quotes

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Put irssi in a chroot jail

  • An Introduction to Gnome Inform7, Part 1
  • Linux tar: /dev/st0: Cannot write: Invalid argument error and solution
  • Filter Out RIAA/MPAA with PeerGuardian on IPCop
  • Setting up ubuntu from scratch
  • Accessing upnp server from ubuntu
  • eBay sniping with JBidwatcher 2.0
  • Ubuntu Forums Menu Firefox Extension

Why does the retail box matter? (openSUSE 11.0 ready for pre-order)

Filed under
SUSE

zonker.opensuse: Retail box? What’s up with that, right? We’re all about the free downloads over here, right? Yes, but… there’s a method to the madness of offering a retail box as well.

Open source ‘not a threat’: group

Filed under
OSS

sunstar.com.ph: A GROUP of computer manufacturers, distributors and dealers in the country believe the emergence of the open source software technology is not a threat to the industry. Instead, the group considers open source technology as a source of “grassroots ideas.”

2.6.26-rc5, "Another Batch Of Mostly Pretty Small Fixes"

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "Another week, another batch of mostly pretty small fixes. Hopefully the regression list is shrinking, and we've fixed at least a couple of the oopses on Arjan's list," said Linux creator Linus Torvalds, announcing the 2.6.26-rc5 kernel.

IceWM Guide

Filed under
HowTos

celettu.wordpress: IceWM is a delightful little window manager, which aims to be must faster than the standard desktop environments like Gnome or KDE, without being as sparse as, for example, Openbox. This step-by-step guide can help anyone who tries to install, configure and use IceWM.

It's Not About the Distro

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: This summer, I'm changing our entire 250+ workstation infrastructure from Fedora to Edubuntu. Under the hood, our computers will be very, very different. Not a single one of my users, however, will notice.

One Linux distro to rule them all?

Filed under
Ubuntu

newlinuxuser.com: In one way or another, Ubuntu has been getting popular over the past how many years. In the beginning I didn’t like Ubuntu much. For the last two years I’ve been wondering if Ubuntu will be the Linux distro to rule them all.

Big Buck Bunny, We Want More!

Filed under
Movies

junauza.com: Blender Institute, part of the Blender Foundation, made another animated open content film entitled Big Buck Bunny. I watched Big Buck Bunny yesterday together with my 3-yr old son. While Elephant's Dream has a darker storyline, Big Buck Bunny is the complete opposite.

Desktop Environments: The Past and The Future

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: While looking at modern operating systems, like: Ubuntu, Windows or Mac OS X, it’s difficult to believe that the GUI is a pretty old idea. The fact that we can see icons on the desktop, or that we can move the mouse pointer around doesn’t mean we’re using a desktop environment. This term stands for a whole of programs enabling to work in a graphical mode.

Opera Looking Sharp

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com: If one word should describe the new look, it would be Sharp. We wanted to create a skin with clean lines and clear icons, inspired by the intuitive symbols you can expect at an airport and in line with our Scandinavian heritage. This also better matches the look and feel we introduced on the Wii and refine in Opera 9.5 for Windows Mobile.

Never Heard of Exherbo? Never Will, Either.

Filed under
Gentoo

crn.com: In the open-source world, it's fairly commonplace for developers to modify an existing application and create a new application. We don't begrudge developers their fun, but Exherbo made us pause. It shares a lot of concepts from Gentoo, but Exherbo's developers claim that it is not a true Gentoo fork.

Can the Average Lawyer Install an Ubuntu Linux Server?

Filed under
Ubuntu

lawtech.wordpress: In April, Canonical had a major, Long Term Service (LTS) release of its Ubuntu Linux distribution, both for the desktop and the server, code-named Hardy Heron. There was quite a bit of hype on the Net about the new features and how good it was. Since I had an older machine from when I upgraded my office desktop, I decided to give it a try.

Mozilla says Firefox 3.0 bug-free

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. late yesterday unveiled the second release candidate of Firefox 3.0 and said all of the issues that remain are on the server or site side, not in the application itself.

Windows will go open source when pigs fly

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet: Matt and the Wall Street Journal have offered some speculation that Windows should go open source. This will happen when pigs fly.

What drives a mass Linux migration?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Nothing warms the cockles of a Linux lover's heart more than to hear that X or Y big company/city is migrating its desktops to the free operating system. And nothing can evoke more bitter insults than the reversal of any such decision.

Top 6 ultra-portable laptops

Filed under
Hardware

techradar.com: The laptop market has been absolutely turned on its head in the last 12 months. In the year that Alienware has unleashed its frighteningly quick Area-51 m15x gaming laptop, all anyone wants to talk about is the latest low-end Eee PC rival to have broken the £300 barrier. Here are six great ultra-portable notebooks available now.

Red Hat Summit Preview: Five Trends Worth Watching

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy will keep a close eye on the Red Hat Summit, which kicks off June 18 in Boston. Here are five trends and themes he’ll be investigating at the event.

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KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website
    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.
  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps
    Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed.
  • Kube in Randa
    I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains. It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).
  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes
    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13. When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use. To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless. [...] In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.

FSF, GNU and FSFE

  • LibrePlanet 2018: Let's talk about Freedom. Embedded.
    The call for sessions is open now, until November 2nd, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. Pre-order a LibrePlanet 10th anniversary t-shirt when you register to attend! Do you want to discuss or teach others about a topic relevant to the free software community? You've got until Thursday, November 2nd, 2017 at 10:00 EDT (14:00 UTC) to submit your session proposals. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and everyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, CFP and registration open now
    The call for proposals is open now, until November 2, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and anyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • dot-zed extractor
  • FSFE Newsletter - September 2017

    To push our demand, the FSFE launched a new campaign last week: "Public Money Public Code". The campaign explains the benefits of releasing publicly funded Software under free licences with a short inspiring video and an open letter to sign. Furthermore, the campaign and the open letter will be used in the coming months until the European Parliament election in 2019 to highlight good and bad examples of publicly funded software development and its potential reuse.

  • Free Software Foundation Europe Leads Call For Taxpayer-Funded Software To Be Licensed For Free Re-use
    Considered objectively, it's hard to think of any good reasons why code that is paid for by the public should not be released publicly as a matter of course. The good news is that this "public money, public code" argument is precisely the approach that open access advocates have used with considerable success in the field of academic publishing, so there's hope it might gain some traction in the world of software too.