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Tuesday, 26 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story MPV 0.4.1 MPlayer-Based Video Player App for Linux Released Rianne Schestowitz 13/07/2014 - 6:46am
Story Linux Kernel 3.2.61 LTS Officially Released with Support for New Devices Rianne Schestowitz 12/07/2014 - 8:10pm
Story 6 Upcoming Linux-Based Smartphone Operating Systems That Aren’t Android Roy Schestowitz 12/07/2014 - 8:05pm
Story Meld 3.11.2 Diff and Merge Tool for GNOME Has Been Released Rianne Schestowitz 12/07/2014 - 7:56pm
Story This Feisty Linux Company Has An Interesting Plan To Topple Android Roy Schestowitz 12/07/2014 - 6:08pm
Story Breach is a completely modular, hackable and open source web browser Rianne Schestowitz 12/07/2014 - 5:34pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 12/07/2014 - 7:50am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 12/07/2014 - 7:49am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 12/07/2014 - 7:48am
Story CentOS 6.5 vs. CentOS 7.0 NAS Performance Comparison Roy Schestowitz 12/07/2014 - 7:32am

linux list bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • linux vs win/mac

  • 10 Things a new Linux user needs to unlearn
  • 10 reasons why Ubuntu is better than Windows

What value in the Red Hat patent guarantee?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: It’s not about right and wrong. It’s about big and small. And in the grand scheme of things Red Hat isn’t that big. Which is why its patent promise doesn’t give me warm fuzzy feelings.

SITA braves open source

Filed under
OSS

itweb.co.za: The State IT Agency (SITA) is transferring its entire technology infrastructure to free, open source and open standards software (FOSS). SITA CEO Llewellyn Jones says the organisation hopes to complete this process within the next four to five months.

Eye Candy: So Bad, Yet So Good

Filed under
Software

blog.linuxtoday.com: Even though I consider myself a fairly advanced Linux user, there are some things in Linux I haven't gotten around to yet. This isn't usually through inability to do something; it's usually a matter of not seeing the need for it. So it is with Compiz.

making deals with M$

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth: There is (again) absolutely no truth to the rumour that Canonical has done a deal with Microsoft for access to codecs - either in return for money, or for some other quid-pro-quo.

Open Source PLUS Open Standards are a “Smart Business Decision” Says E.U.

Filed under
OSS

Jim Zemlin: The New York Times reports today a hard rebuke from European Union’s competition commissioner, Neelie Kroes, against Microsoft’s tactics in Europe. Certainly when using any software this matters, but let’s take a closer look at how this advice relates to open source. Evaluate the following statement for accuracy. True or False?

UKUUG Court Case Falls at First Hurdle

Filed under
OSS
Legal

linuxsolutions.fr: The UK UNIX USER Group (UKUUG) looks likely to drop their legal challenge to Microsoft’s controversial international document standard because it doesn’t have the money to see the court case out.

Rapid Linux apps using object databases

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: When you think of databases usually MySQL or Oracle or even Microsoft SQL Server come to mind. Yet, object oriented databases have the potential to cut down coding nuts and bolts and speed up app development time – particularly for those migrating to Linux from Windows. Here’s one such compelling SourceForge hosted open source system to do just this.

How to Dual Boot Linux and Windows XP

Filed under
HowTos

pcmag.com: Why choose between two operating systems when you can have both in one PC? We show you how to dual-boot Linux and Windows XP in the ASUS EeePC 900.

Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring released

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva today announces the release of Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring, the new release of its popular bootable distribution on a USB key. This new version uses the new Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring as its base, doubles the key's capacity to 8GB, introduces a new installer which allows you to install Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring to the system's hard disk, and comes in an attractive new white color scheme.

Spawn of Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

linux-mag.com: All the major distributions including Slackware, Red Hat, SUSE, Gentoo, and Debian have reproduced to the point where the children scarcely look like the parent. Now the children have grown up enough to begin procreating new and exciting distributions of their own for every whim and user type.

Linux in Education: Concepts Not Applications

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: One of the biggest arguments used against Linux in grade school level education is that we aren't teaching kids to use the applications they'll use in the "real world". As the Technology Director for a K-12 school district, I've heard that argument many times. After all these years, I still don't buy it.

Desktop Effects Power Consumption

Filed under
Software

linuxappfinder.com: I recently installed the KDE4 version of Kubuntu on my laptop using the Wubi installer and was able to start using KWin's desktop effects on my laptop. After installing KDE4.1 beta 1 I started to get curious about battery life.

The Power of Plasma theming - a gallery of 23 themes

Filed under
KDE

liquidat.wordpress: One of the most often mentioned concerns at the KDE booth at LinuxTag was the question if Plasma would force the user to have a black panel. While we did have a second machine showing another theme to resolve all doubts it showed that not all users now yet the power of Plasma theming.

PCLinuxOS 2007: Funny name, serious distro

Filed under
PCLOS

techiemoe.com: The last time I looked at PCLinuxOS was version 0.92, which according to DistroWatch was about 3 years ago. I was asked to take a look at it again, so here I go.

Review: TinyMe 2008

Filed under
PCLOS

raiden.net: About a year ago we reviewed TinyMe when it was still in its beta and test stage. But a lot has happened in the past year, and all of it good. But what makes it so good? Well, in addition to fixing all the bugs and little quirks, TinyMe has become more stable and loads faster than it was in the early days.

Announcing GNOME Do 0.5: “The Fighting 0.5″

Filed under
Software

blog.davebsd: It has been 41 days since we released GNOME Do 0.4.2, and today I’m honored to present GNOME Do 0.5: “The Fighting 0.5″. Without further ado, here are the main improvements and new features, accompanied by plenty of sexy screenshots.

What is the ultimate goal of Linux?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.ittoolbox: Microsoft has a goal. Apple has a goal. What is Linux's goal? Linux is such a large amoebic entity that it has no clear boundaries. There are no real limits to what Linux can be made to do.

Settling is Not Winning

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Dear Red Hat, I know it might have been cheaper and definitely shorter this way, and I know your North American users will think you did it right, but it's NOT right!

Chiron FS lets you set up RAID-1 over the network

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: The Linux kernel includes support for performing RAID-1 in software. RAID-1 maintains the same filesystem on two or more disks, so that you can lose all but the last disk and still retain all of your data. This seems wonderful until you consider that an error in RAM, a power supply failure, or another hardware component in the machine can still potentially corrupt your precious data.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.

Red Hat: ‘Hybrid Cloud’, University of Alabama, Red Hat Upgrades Ansible and Expectations