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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fairphone – the Fair Trade Coffee of Android Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 12:46am
Story Free courses for getting started in the open source cloud Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 12:25am
Story You can return your Android app and get full refund Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 12:16am
Story Monstrous TiVo DVR has six tuners, holds 24TB Rianne Schestowitz 11/09/2014 - 12:02am
Story KDE Akademy 2014 – Welcome, new KDE board! Rianne Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 8:47pm
Story Edison IoT module ships with Atom/Quark combo SoC Rianne Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 8:42pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 7:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 7:50pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 7:49pm
Story India based start-up Flockport launches first Linux container-sharing website Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 7:15pm

Lawyer's Funny AntiLinux FUD Turns Out to be Not So Funny

Filed under
Linux

groklaw.net: I put this article from Law.com's Legal Technology page, "Commentary: The Penguin Doesn't Fly, Avoid Linux" in News Picks because I found it hilarious, in the Rob Enderle kind of way. But then I thought I'd look up the author on Google, and lo and behold, I find he said something that appears to be not exactly true.

How to: Customize your GNU/Linux desktop in 7 easy steps

Filed under
HowTos

catswhocode.com: I absolutely love Linux, but in terms of design I have saw better than the default theme of most of the available distributions. Here’s a complete how-to for giving your Linux desktop the look you want and customize everything, from themes to fonts.

Ubuntu Mobile Edition: Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxplanet.com: The mobile Internet device (MID) space is one of the fastest growing platforms with new concept designs appearing every month. Nokia was one of the earliest vendors with a product (Nokia 770) in this space to ship with a Linux operating system (OS) and continues to see solid sales with the current model 810. New concept designs come in a wide range of shapes and sizes, and many sport a Linux OS.

Try Ubuntu - why you should try Ubuntu.

Filed under
Linux

Is Ubuntu suited for you? In this article I will try to give you some idea of the capabilities of Ubuntu to see if they fit your needs.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • More OpenDocument Updates

  • Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex: Visual exploration of NetworkManager Applet 0.7
  • Dag Wieers intelligent swipe at Ubuntu
  • AppChecker: No More Linux Cross-Platform Blues?
  • Using FTP Clients in Ubuntu
  • Reader Report from OSCON
  • List of BitTorrent clients Available in Ubuntu Linux
  • Richard Stallman in Auckland: On copyright in a networked world
  • Turn OpenOffice.org into a Web-editing tool with ODF@WWW
  • Intel's GEM Driver Enters Mainline Code
  • Howto Install ZFS-FUSE on Ubuntu 8.04
  • IBM Linux laptop push gets a boost
  • SplashTop Linux Security Hole Discovered
  • Creating an Audio CD with mp3cd
  • The Open Source Community
  • Are vendors afraid of open source?
  • Using Open Source in your Business: Myths and Clarifications

Fast ext4 fsck times

Filed under
Software

thunk.org/tytso/blog: This wasn’t one of the things we were explicitly engineering for when were designing the features that would go into ext4, but one of the things which we’ve found as a pleasant surprise is how much more quickly ext4 filesystems can be checked.

You've CUPSed a long way, baby

Filed under
Software

stompbox.typepad: I am sitting at a lounge in Detroit waiting for my flight to Argentina for Debconf. They have a printer available, and the guy in front of me is plugged in and got the CD of drivers from the front desk and was wrestling with this thing for like 15 minutes.

An Open Letter to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

theunixgeek.blogspot: Don't get me wrong on this - I love Linux and Ubuntu is one of my favorite distros, but there were some problems that temporarily turned me away.

Linux-compatible netbook sports multiple colors

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Digital Gadgets has announced an 8.9-inch netbook computer that will sell under the Sylvania brand name. Offered in four different colors, the Linux-compatible "g netbook MESO" includes a 1.6GHz Atom processor, 80GB hard drive, four-cell battery, webcam, and 802.11b/g wireless networking, according to the company.

Interview With The SourceForge Community Manager

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

hehe2.net: SourceForge is one of the most important entities in the Open Source movement. They manage the geek mecca of slashdot, sell geek paraphernalia that makes all our dreams come true at thinkgeek, manage Freshmeat the mega app hub, and administer over 170,000 Open Source projects at SourceForge. This week I bring you an interview with the community manager at SourceForge, Ross Turk.

Open source technology is hungry for new college grads

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Many college graduates are finding it difficult to enter the information technology world with little or no work experience. There is no such thing as an entry-level position anymore, and more and more graduates are finding themselves in a catch-22 situation because of this.

Ubuntu Hardy on the Vye S41

Filed under
Ubuntu

geekeree.wordpress: So here’s a good topic to get into on the geekery, UMPCs. I really like these small form factor laptops. So much I’ve got 2! The machine ships with Vista Home Premium, and as we all know, Vista is a resource Pig. So I fired up the first Ubuntu 8.04 cd I could find.

Netbooks spark Linux redesigns

Filed under
Linux
  • Netbooks spark Linux redesigns

  • LinuxWorld 2008: Enthusiasm Up, Attendance Down - Cool Booth
  • Open Source and the Poor Man's Supercomputer
  • From Lego robots to hammers and nails, Linux gets embedded
  • LinuxWorld: The Thrill Is Gone
  • LinuxWorld: Tux redux?
  • Linux World 2008/Streets of San Francisco

Getting closer to Opera 9.52

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com: All right. Another snapshot for you as we're getting ever closer to version 9.52. Fixed problem where some IRC commands were not working, Fixed problem where UI would not update after unsubscribing an IMAP folder, and Several improvements to the skin.

And then there are some days that suck

Filed under
Linux

newlinuxuser.com: You get an error message upon booting up. Something like kernel panic. Your friend has the webcam oh Yahoo! Messenger and you couldn’t view it. The cd you got from a friend could not be mounted...

Is Microsoft trying to kill Apache?

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: When the story about Microsoft shelling out $100,000 to Apache for ASF sponsorship broke across my radar it rather tickled my funny bone and my curiosity. When ASF Chairman Jim Jagielski declared that “Microsoft’s sponsorship makes it clear that Microsoft “gets it” regarding the ASF” I had a fit of the giggles—and then, like many others, I started to ponder on the reasons why and what it actually meant.

Three things the Linux desktops needs to do to beat Windows

Filed under
Linux

sjvn: "What does Linux need to do to compete more successfully on the desktop?" We came up with several pain points, but some of them are clearly hurting Linux more than the others.

Amarok 2: a first look

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: With all the hoopla that has been surrounding KDE 4, I’d almost forget there’s another major piece of software working on a milestone release. Maybe not as major as KDE, but Amarok is arguably the best and most popular media player on the linux desktop. Amarok 2 is shaping up to be as radically different from Amarok 1.4 and that’s a very good thing indeed.

Linux Users on NBC's Olympics Videos: We Don't Get No Respect

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Where is Rodney Dangerfield when we need him? There are some heated messages flying around in the Ubuntu forums because NBC has announced that it will offer its online video coverage of the Beijing Olympics to Internet Explorer and Firefox users on the Mac and Windows, but not to Linux browser users.

Linspire is going away

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Linspire, the distribution originally launched as Lindows, is no more, says Xandros CEO Andreas Typaldos.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

  • Connected sex-toy allows for code-injection attacks on a robot you wrap around your genitals

    However, the links included base-64 encoded versions of the entire blowjob file, making it vulnerable to code-injection attacks. As Lewis notes, "I will leave you to ponder the consequences of having an XSS vulnerability on a page with no framebusting and preauthed connection to a robot wrapped around or inside someones genitals..."

  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty
    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice. In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks. Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS. By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.” More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?
  • Why microservices are a security issue
    And why is that? Well, for those of us with a systems security bent, the world is an interesting place at the moment. We're seeing a growth in distributed systems, as bandwidth is cheap and latency low. Add to this the ease of deploying to the cloud, and more architects are beginning to realise that they can break up applications, not just into multiple layers, but also into multiple components within the layer. Load balancers, of course, help with this when the various components in a layer are performing the same job, but the ability to expose different services as small components has led to a growth in the design, implementation, and deployment of microservices.

Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine. "The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required." Read more

today's leftovers

  • qBittorrent 4.0 Is a Massive Update of the Open-Source BitTorrent Client
    qBittorrent, the open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client written in Qt for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, has been updated to version 4.0, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements. qBittorrent 4.0 is the first release of the application to drop OS/2 support, as well as support for the old Qt 4 framework as Qt 5.5.1 or later is now required to run it on all supported platforms. It also brings a new logo and a new SVG-based icon theme can be easily scaled. Lots of other cosmetic changes are present in this release, and the WebGUI received multiple enhancements.
  • FFmpeg Continues Working Its "NVDEC" NVIDIA Video Decoding Into Shape
    Earlier this month the FFmpeg project landed its initial NVDEC NVIDIA video decoding support after already supporting NVENC for video encoding. These new NVIDIA APIs for encode/decode are part of the company's Video Codec SDK with CUDA and is the successor to the long-used VDPAU video decoding on NVIDIA Linux boxes. That NVDEC support has continued getting into shape.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.10075 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    A new firmware for the Kobo ebook reader came out and I adjusted the mega update pack to use it. According to the comments in the firmware thread it is working faster than previous releases. The most incredible change though is the update from wpa_supplicant 0.7.1 (around 2010) to 2.7-devel (current). Wow.
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC has dual mini-PCIe slots and triple displays
    Avalue’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ECM-APL2” SBC features Apollo Lake SoCs, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, triple displays, and optional -40 to 85°C. Avalue’s 3.5-inch, Apollo Lake based ECM-APL single-board computer was announced a year ago, shortly after Intel unveiled its Apollo Lake generation. Now it has followed up with an ECM-APL2 3.5-incher with a slightly different, and reduced, feature set.
  • 7 Best Android Office Apps To Meet Your Productivity Needs
    Office application is an essential suite that allows you to create powerful spreadsheets, documents, presentations, etc., on a smartphone. Moreover, Android office apps come with cloud integration so that you can directly access the reports from the cloud, edit them, or save them online. To meet the productivity need of Android users, the Play Store offers an extensive collection of Android office apps. But, we have saved you the hassle of going through each one of them and provided you a list of the best office apps for Android. The apps that we have picked are all free, although some do have Pro version or extra features available for in-app purchases. You can also refer to this list if you’re looking for Microsoft Office alternatives for your PC.

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