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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 26 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Dell XPS 13: Free as in Freedom srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 4:03pm
Story Win back your digital independence with Mandriva srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 4:02pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 5:09am
Story 5 Intriguing New Features in Linux 3.10 srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 2:29am
Story Change OSS Licenses to Make More Money? srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 1:00am
Story A Desktop Seismic Shift to Qt srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 12:57am
Story Is Windows use an addiction? srlinuxx 04/07/2013 - 12:56am
Story Wargaming Mobilizes with Linux and Open Source srlinuxx 03/07/2013 - 11:46pm
Story In a World Without Open Source srlinuxx 03/07/2013 - 8:22pm
Story AMD Joins TDF Advisory Board To Accelerate LibreOffice srlinuxx 03/07/2013 - 8:20pm

Mark Shuttleworth Develops New Way to Distribute OSS

Filed under
Ubuntu

OSWeekly: Just when I was sure that I had seen just about every sort of means of distributing open source software, the concept of the Freedom Toaster rolled into my inbox. Based on the idea that open source software should be made readily available to those in need, the distribution center/kiosks from Mark Shuttleworth and the Freedom Toaster team are here with another innovative product in the market.

Is it time to open source Microsoft Windows?

Filed under
Microsoft

CBR: Given the importance of the Microsoft Windows platform in global IT, perhaps it is time for Windows to be opened up and made open source. Indeed, while some may consider such a move unthinkable, a number of benefits could be had from it, for both Microsoft and the global IT world.

Halo movie canned

Filed under
Movies

the inquirer: THERE is no chance of a movie being made of Halo, despite it being the most successful game classic since Space Invaders.

The Perfect Desktop - OpenSUSE 10.3 (GNOME)

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an OpenSUSE 10.3 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

today's leftovers

  • HOWTO make Gentoo great

  • What is your LUG doing?
  • Threading Benchmarks, NetBSD versus FreeBSD
  • Microsoft "regrets patent deal" tactics
  • Boot Linux Faster With An Open BIOS
  • Upgrading to Gutsy
  • The OLPC is "retro-futurist"
  • Open Source conference in Argentina draws a crowd
  • Some thoughts on git
  • Novell OES 2: Powered by Linux
  • Google's OS dreams calling on Linux

The Future of Hardware is Open Source

Filed under
Hardware

raiden's realm: What if we lived in a world where all hardware was open source, including CPU’s, memory, motherboards, and all peripherals? Would it be a better world, or would it be a rolling nightmare, plagued with problems, and rampant with show stopping bugs that would bring the world to a grinding halt?

KDE Commit-Digest for 7th October 2007

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Image support in Parley, and support for formulas in the note feature of the Step physics simulation package. blinKen changes capitalisation to Blinken for the KDE 4.0 release. Theme work across kdegames, with better collision detection in Kolf. More XMP integration work in Digikam.

Linux Mint 3.1

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Linux Mint is (if you'll pardon the pun) a fresh idea: take a decently popular and stable distribution, and add all the stuff that said distribution's maintainers refuse to add even though their users want it. The time for excuses is over for the Linux desktop.

Sabayon Linux

Filed under
Linux

go2linux.org: Sabayon is an Italian Linux that is user oriented, and it is based on Gentoo. Ok the first thing you will see when start installing Sabayon is Anaconda, as I am a fan of Fedora, this was great for me, as Anaconda is a great installer.

An in-depth look at Puppy Linux

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Guest columnist Howard Fosdick has previously used Puppy Linux to successfully revive "mature" PCs. Now, he takes a broader, deeper look at the parsimonious distribution and its potential value on normal desktop PCs, covering its features, flexibility, capability to peacefully coexist with Windows, ease of use, and limitations.

Bastille: Classic Linux and Unix Security

Filed under
Linux

Carla Schroder: The glamorous new kids in the Linux security parade are SELinux, AppArmor, and all manner of virtualization technologies. But don't overlook the reliable, helpful old-timer Bastille Linux.

Review: openSuSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

sunnytalkstech.blogspot: For the last 10+ yrs, I have spent quite a lot of my PC experience on SuSE beginning with v4.2. openSuse 10.3 was released 4th Oct, 2007. A lot has improved over the years and I've seen how SuSE has improved with every new version.

Ubuntu Users Looking For Linux Chicks

Filed under
Ubuntu

Alexander Wolfe: It's always been my impression that, appearances to the contrary, Linux aficionados are no different than the rest of us. So I wasn't surprised when I saw a post on the Ubuntu Women forum, from a guy, who's wondering if there are "any good places online to meet like-minded free software women."

openSUSE 10.3: one step forward, two steps back

Filed under
SUSE

iTWire: These days when you download a Linux distribution and burn it to CD, you would expect that it would not take too much of an effort to have a look at it. Unless, of course, it's one of three distributions which are aimed at so-called geeks - Gentoo, Debian and Slackware.

Also: openSUSE 10.3 - Review

How to effectively address the free software community

Filed under
OSS

Rudd-O: Winds of change are sweeping through the software industry. Today, it’s no longer fashionable to decry free software types as it was just a few years ago — the cool kids are all “leveraging” and reaching out to free software communities. But not everyone’s doing it right, so let’s explore how to start a positive relationship with free software.

Fluxbox Stable 1.0 Released

Filed under
Fluxbox

Fluxbox.net: A new stable release! Finally after almost four and a half years with 0.9.x release we got to 1.0.0! This release includes a lot of bugfixes, new styles, updated language support, better shaped corners and much more.

sniffing a few distros, part 2

Filed under
Linux

beranger: While several people are rushing into openSUSE 10.3 ("too good to skip", said this guy), I have kept my desktop's openSUSE 10.2 mostly unused, as I have been using Fedora 7 on my laptop, and then I replaced it with several RHEL5 clones...

A Mandrivan's First Look at openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
MDV
SUSE

Frederik's Blog: I downloaded the OpenSUSE 10.3 DVD to test it out and compare it with Mandriva 2008.0. I was interested in reviewing the current state of this distribution and maybe also get some inspiration for improvements I can propose for Mandriva 2008.1.

A Death Threat From A Puppy Linux Supporter

Filed under
Linux

Caitlyn Martin: I’ve just been informed by e-mail that not only are some defenders of Puppy Linux flaming me on the new DistroWatch Weekly comments but one actually issued a death threat against me for being “negative” about his or her favorite distribution.

Hacking openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

softwareinreview.com: Novell's openSUSE 10.3 is an exciting desktop operating environment that includes or supports nearly every program you need for work and play. But there are those last few programs and issues that make openSUSE just short of perfect. Web browser plugins for some kinds of online content; Windows Media and DVD movie playback support; and drivers for Atheros wireless devices and Nvidia and ATI video cards are the chief things holding openSUSE back for some users. This guide will help you remove as many of those barriers as possible.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Events: IBM Interconnect, foss-north 2017, C++ in Russia

  • What I’m looking forward to at IBM Interconnect 2017
    IBM Interconnect 2017 is coming up next month in Las Vegas. Last year’s conference was a whirlwind of useful talks, inspiring hallway conversations, and great networking opportunities. I was exhausted by the week’s end, but it was totally worth it.
  • foss-north 2017
    After much preparation, the tickets for foss-north 2017 is available at foss-north.se – grab them while they are hot!
  • C++ in Russia, again
    Yesterday during our team meeting Eike told me that I’m a mobile C++ conference nowadays. While it sounds funny, it is true that I’ve been a bit more active than usual.

Manjaro-Arm is Shutting Down

It is with deep regret that we are announcing that the Manjaro-Arm team is shutting down. I started this project a little over a year ago with no intent to become the sole maintainer. Read more

KDE and Qt

  • The Novelty of KDE Neon
    The good folks at KDE managed to engage a market of Linux desktop users underserved by other distribution models. Or, maybe it’s just me. KDE has a long history in the desktop ecosystem. It was the first Linux desktop I was exposed to back in 2006. Back then, it was on OpenSUSE and it was clean and functional. For some reason after that, installing KDE had never really appealed to me. I’ve tested it out briefly when poking around at what the OpenSUSE guys were doing and I’ve run Kubuntu for brief snippets. For years, I’ve been trying to find out what type of desktop user I am and which distro fits my needs.
  • Tracking KDE Frameworks and Qt
    The KDE-FreeBSD team bumped Qt to 5.7.1 and KDE Frameworks to 5.31.0 in official ports last week, so we’re fairly up-to-date in that department. On FreeBSD, we still fully support Qt4 next to Qt5, so some of the delay in getting this stuff in is due to some shuffling of install locations. In particular, we’ve added qt-chooser in this round of updates, so that qmake is qmake — and no longer qmake-qt4 or some other suffixed binary. We use qt-chooser to switch out one or the other. Checking that this doesn’t break anything else — or at least making sure that everything still compiles — is what took the most time this round of updates.
  • Simple Menu Launcher for KDE Plasma 5.9
    Following "United" theme, there is also "Simple Menu" launcher for KDE Plasma 5.9. It's minimal, a smaller form of full screen menu; it's also clean, showing all applications at once. Honestly, it's UI is similar to Pantheon Menu in elementary OS but including categories. If you like horizontal-oriented menu, Simple Menu is suitable for you. It's available to install from KDE Store. Thanks to Sho for creating Simple Menu.
  • A Simple KDE Twitter Plasmoid
    This KDE Twitter Plasmoids offers a simpler alternative to a desktop Linux twitter app like Choqok. See tweets, send tweets, and check mentions.
  • Telegram desktop client for flatpak #2
    Some time ago I posted a blog post about how I packed telegram desktop client for flatpak. I’ve been updating it since then in some reasonable intervals as I don’t have time to update it more often and mostly because the telegram client’s build system breaks my build quite oftenly. Recently I discovered that someone managed to patch telegram to use system Qt libraries instead of building own patched Qt and building linking it statically. After some time I managed to adjust those patches and make them work with my build which allows me to use Qt from KDE runtimes. Here are new instructions how to get this work:
  • Building the latest greatest for Android AArch64 (with Vulkan teaser)
    Let’s say you got a 64-bit ARM device running Android. For instance, the Tegra X1-based NVIDIA Shield TV. Now, let’s say you are also interested in the latest greatest content from the dev branch, for example to try out some upcoming Vulkan enablers from here and here, and want to see all this running on the big screen with Android TV. How do we get Qt, or at least the basic modules like QtGui, QtQuick, etc. up and running on there?
  • Qt Quick WebGL Streaming
    WebGL Streaming is optimized for Qt Quick and allows you to run remote Qt Quick applications in a browser.