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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Randa Meetings 2014 - Another Great Success Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 5:05pm
Story Greg Kroah-Hartman on Contributing to the Kernel, Life as a Maintainer, Beer, and More Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 5:03pm
Story How to get the most out of a Raspberry Pi? Your tech questions answered Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 10:50am
Story Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 10:31am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 2:38am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 2:37am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 2:36am
Story Linux 3.18 released Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 2:03am
Story New Features On The Horizon For The Linux Kernel Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 2:01am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 1:32am

Demand for Linux PCs varies across Asia

Filed under
Linux

zdnetasia.com: Linux-based PCs have reportedly been getting a bad rap for consumer resistance, but manufacturers say demand for them varies between the different Asian markets.

Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10 64 bit Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

penguinway.net: I waited a few days to let the load on the servers cool down so I could try Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10 out on my new Dell Inspiron 530 system. For those who don’t know, a 32 bit OS can’t address over 4 gigs of memory. So 64 bit is quickly becoming a necessity with the systems coming out today.

Sapphire Radeon HD 4830 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: The launch of the RV770 GPU earlier this year by AMD was quite successful. The Radeon HD 4850 and Radeon HD 4870 series feature best-in-class performance. If you are looking for leading performance and all of the bells and whistles on the newest ATI graphics cards but at a lower cost, AMD recently introduced the Radeon HD 4830.

13 Great Linux Videos!

Linux does not need multi-million advertising on top TV networks!
Every one of us can spread the word, with such high quality videos.

Installing And Using OpenVZ On Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare an Ubuntu 8.10 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project.

Linux Setup iSCSI Target ( SAN )

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Linux target framework (tgt) aims to simplify various SCSI target driver (iSCSI, Fibre Channel, SRP, etc) creation and maintenance. The key goals are the clean integration into the scsi-mid layer and implementing a great portion of tgt in user space.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Printing: A Curious Mix of Yuck and Excellence, part 1

  • What’s unique about openSUSE?
  • 50 Essential Open Source Security Tools
  • USB MiniMe 2008 install from Windows
  • Linux powered Yoggie goes open source
  • Does cb2bib remove drudgery from bibliography creation?
  • Level of Effort and Empowerment
  • 10 ways to amuse a geek
  • G1G1 coming to Europe Nov. 17
  • The license wars are over
  • Windows: The pit stop on the road to open source
  • Next generation C++ "goes beta"
  • IPFire, the Lean Linux firewall
  • Exploring VIM configurations

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing and Setting Up Avant Window Navigator

  • Ubuntu, the absolute beginners guide
  • Installing a vanilla Firefox in Kubuntu Intrepid
  • Developing with libyui/libzypp & python - part4
  • Relaying Postfix SMTP via smtp.gmail.com
  • Ubuntu Ignored Ickthyopterix 8.10 Static IP Bug
  • A Secure Nagios Server
  • Convert Flac To Ogg Vorbis In Three (Easy) Steps
  • Ubuntu 10 things in a terminal
  • Ways To Grab Screenshots In Ubuntu

Specialty Linuxes to the rescue

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com.au: Six sweet distributions that can boot from a pen drive, run in a sliver of RAM, rejuvenate an old system, or recover data from a dead PC.

File Roller is a piece of sh*t

Filed under
Software

linuxd.wordpress: I never liked File Roller, and now I’ve got proof it sucks. Besides terrible usability, it handles partitioned rar files very badly. By partitioned I mean when a rar file is separated into .r00 .r01 etc parts, by very badly I mean it can’t handle it at all.

Open-source companies crashing en masse? Puh-lease!

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet: Remember Trip Chowdhry, the analyst with Global Equities Research? He's the guy who said that Red Hat is rubbish, and that the entire LAMP stack is potty, too. Given how far off Chowdhry was then, it's perhaps no surprise that he's now claiming that "'almost every VC funded open-source company is struggling and will run out of funds within the next six months."

LZMA compression becoming the better choice

Filed under
Software

opsamericas.com: If you have not heard about it, certainly start reading up on it and DO use it. If your using bzip2 currently then your going to like this even more.

Opera UI feedback

Filed under
Software

opera.com/blog: I'm currently working on a strategy on how to take the Opera User Interface forward, and I'm eager to get your opinions on a particular subject: Native look and feel.

Firefox 3.1 beta 2 delayed, beta 3 now sheduled

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet: The Mozilla team had decided to delay beta 2 and release a beta 3 in order to resolve bugs and garner more feedback before the early 2009 ship.

Tiny hardware firewall opened to Linux hackers

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: A vendor of miniature hardware firewalls has started shipping two user-modifiable products. Delivered with sandboxed cross-compiling development tools, and an open source Linux firewall stack, the Open Firewall SOHO and Pico give sysadmins, security pros, and hobbyists access to Yoggie's nifty hardware for the first time.

Novell offers RHEL, CentOS support

Filed under
SUSE

linux-watch.com: Novell has launched a "competitive replacement" program aimed at luring Red Hat and CentOS users to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) product. Through the program, Novell will support customers' RHEL or CentOS servers for up to two years, while the customer migrates to SLES.

The big Windows 7 lie

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: You’ve read the early reviews with comments like Windows 7 is a big improvement over Vista and Windows 7 is wicked fast. Sounds great doesn’t it? On closer inspection though Windows 7 M3 (Milestone 3) is being revealed as being just a “slightly tweaked version of Vista.”

Also: Is Windows 7 Vista all over again?

The sad state of emerald for compiz & its possible demise

Filed under
Software

benkevan.com: Emerald is no longer maintained which means, unless someone really steps up it’ll just be a memory.

Ubuntu Experiences

Filed under
Ubuntu

manishtech.wordpress: I have been using Ubuntu for quite a long time and seen lots of its releases. Some of them were really groundbreaking in features. Many of them showed a new route for other distro developers. Indeed Ubuntu enjoys a strong community ahead of Fedora.

Slitaz to the rescue

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Most of my hardware questions about my FMV-5100 have been answered, thanks to Slitaz. A quick hop, skip and jump from an installation, and I had a booting, self-configuring Linux system in place on my newest family member.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.

Android Leftovers

Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison). Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away. Read more

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler
    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.
  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler
    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4. This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.
  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark
    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018. That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office. The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.