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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 07/08/2011 - 4:37am
Story HGE comes to Mac and Linux (guest post from Ryan Gordon) srlinuxx 07/08/2011 - 4:32am
Story The transition from “them” to “we” srlinuxx 07/08/2011 - 12:16am
Story Ubuntu 11.10 Alpha 3 Review | Oneiric Ocelot srlinuxx 07/08/2011 - 12:14am
Story openSUSE Weekly News 187 is out srlinuxx 07/08/2011 - 12:12am
Story What is the difference between GNOME, KDE, Xfce, and LXDE? srlinuxx 1 06/08/2011 - 9:15pm
Story 20 years of the Web srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 6:34pm
Story Ignore the speculation, Linux is far from dead srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 6:32pm
Story 141 nice fonts srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 6:30pm
Story Fedora 15 Sometimes Really Suck srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 6:25pm

OpenOffice: More Pros Than Cons

Filed under
Software

The most obvious pro of OpenOffice.org (the official name for the software) is that it's free.

OpenOffice is an ongoing project developed collaboratively by users and developers around the globe. They make their handiwork available online at no cost to anyone who wants it, including individuals, employers and schools.

Consensus Approval

Steps to manually mount a USB flash drive in GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

I recently got hold of a 1 GB USB memory stick. But when I tried to mount it in a bare bones Linux distribution (a distribution which has just enough software as is needed), it was not mounted automatically. This is because the auto mounting takes place by means of a program known as hotplug which detects the USB device that is inserted in real time and then mounts it in the desired location.

Linux Desktop – Is it an Option for Normal Users?

Filed under
Linux

Linux has long held the promise of offering normal users an alternative to Windows. With the arrival of the high priced Windows Vista Support Alert subscriber "Briard" decides to put 12 Linux distros to the test.

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Novell BrainShare 2007 Preview

Filed under
SUSE

When Novell's BrainShare users' show opens its doors this Sunday, Microsoft will be on hand for the first time ever. With and without this controversial, recently minted partner, Novell will issue announcements around SUSE Linux in areas that include products, training, and new customer wins, say company sources.

Top Drupal & CiviCRM Gotchas

Filed under
Software
Drupal

Thinking of trying the Drupal open source content management system?

Festival: Linux Text-To-Speech

Filed under
HowTos

Festival is a free software for speech synthesis, it is distributed under an X11-type licence allowing unrestricted commercial and non-commercial use alike.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Open Source Flash Library Now Plays YouTube Videos

Filed under
Software

Benjamin Otte has Swfdec working with YouTube. Swfdec is a library for decoding and rendering Flash animations. It is still in heavy development. The intended audience are developers or people using it for pretested Flash animations (think embedded here). If you use it on unknown content, expect it to have issues and don't be surprised if it crashes.

The More Things Change

Filed under
SUSE

Sometimes you just look at things and realize that they are just plain funny.

That was what ran through my mind this week when I saw this headline from Computer Business Review: "HSBC Signs Up for Microsoft's SUSE Linux Support." The double-take took a bit to settle in, because for a second I wondered if Microsoft actually owned SUSE Linux now.

K3b 1.0 Released

Filed under
Software

I am proud to announce the release of K3b 1.0. After years and years of development, all the sweat (actually in the summer it can get sticky in front of the screen), all the tears (ok, admittedly, not that many), and all the countless hours I spent on a single application finally we have what I think is worth the big 1.

Gentoo's Proposed Code of Conduct Adopted

Filed under
Gentoo

In no small part due to the wide exposure of a high-profile article published earlier in the week on in-fighting and other disgraceful behaviors from developers and contributors, Gentoo announced a proposed Code of Conduct.

Slower, safer rollouts ahead for Firefox bug fixes

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Corp. is changing the way it publishes security fixes for its Firefox browser.

Over the next day, the open-source company plans to begin delivering bug fixes to a select group of beta testers who will try out the upcoming Firefox 2.0.0.3 version before it is released to all Firefox users.

Beryl: Eye Candy For the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Software

Ever wanted to take the window open on your desktop and set it on fire? If you happen to be running Linux, you're in luck.

Jaw-dropping 3D desktop effects first came to the Linux desktop by way of the Novell sponsored Compiz effort which got started over a year ago.

A Long Time Ago, In a Wiki Far, Far Away

Filed under
Web

The Star Wars Saga carries arguably the largest fan base of any one particular work of fiction. Fanboys and uber-geeks have made the Internet their platform to engage in endless debates surrounding topics such as the exact specifications of the X-Wing Starfighter to whether or not the destruction of the first Death Star was an inside job.

The Intrepid Investigator Report -- Sniffing Powdered Ubuntu CDs Cures Cancer!

Filed under
Humor

The Intrepid Investigator

Ubuntu Cures Cancer
by reporter Ursula Upton
filed: 16 March 2007 at 13:52.

Yes, it's a genuine miracle. In a scientific study by reputable scientists Borg Benderle and Lamer DiDiot (both affiliated with Shuttlecock University), the study found that sniffing powdered Ubuntu CDs brings about a dramatic reduction in the size of cancer tumors.

Affinity - GNOME desktop search tool

Filed under
Software

Affinity is a front end desktop search tool that uses Beagle or Tracker as backend desktop search engine. Some of the current features in Affinity are:

* Front-end to both the Beagle & Tracker desktop search engines.
* Has actions (configurable through Desktop files), which speeds up common tasks.

Learning GIMP - Part 1

Filed under
Software

GIMP a.k.a. GNU Image Manipulation Program is a 100% free software created to view and edit almost all image formats out there. Not only that it is the best FREE photo editor, it is also compatible with many operating systems like Linux, Windows or Mac OS X and translated into many languages.

Become a digital video editing guru using Linux tools

Filed under
HowTos

Shooting, editing, and producing video clips has been my passion for about 10 years. As a free software adept, I always tried to perform this process on Linux. This year I have finally found a set of tools that work for me. This article provides a brief tutorial on home video production.

Slightly changed openSUSE 10.2 ISOs released

Filed under
SUSE

today we are releasing slightly changed openSUSE 10.2 ISO images. The reason for putting out those updated ISOs is a license issue, which had to be addressed. The following ISOs have be replaced on the mirrors:

* openSUSE-10.2-GM-Addon-NonOSS-BiArch.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-Addon-NonOSS-ppc.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-DVD-i386.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-DVD-ppc.iso

Installing OpenSSL Support for Ruby on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

The more I work with Ubuntu, the more I think it’s a very good desktop, but not a good development machine. For instance, you can install Ruby 1.8.4 from the package management system, but not 1.8.5 (or 1.8.6 which is now the latest). So you’re stuck compiling ruby on your own.

Red Hat insists rivals not gaining

Filed under
Linux

Responding to ZDNet Asia's query Thursday during the launch of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and Exchange, Scott H. Crenshaw, the company's vice president of enterprise Linux platform business, said: "I've seen no data to suggest that we're losing market share." Crenshaw added that Novell's revenues from its Linux products are nothing to shout about.

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More in Tux Machines

Windows, Mac or Linux... Which operating system best suits your business?

Linux is a free alternative. Apart from the zero-cost factor, it's still less prone to viruses than Windows. Most Linux machines start out as Windows computers that are reformatted. Linux is also adaptable -- Linux is an OS kernel, not a full system, but is the heart of software distributions such as Ubuntu or Fedora. As for cons, Linux is more complex to learn and use. There are also far fewer programs written for Linux systems. Of course, someone with an advanced online computer science master’s degree will help you make the most of a Linux system by supplying the skills needed to innovate and implement custom solutions for your business environment. Read more

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5 Ways to Solve the Open Source Industry's Biggest Problems

Over the last decade, open source software and its audience of end users have greatly matured. Once only used by a small subset of tech-savvy early adopters, the convenience, effectiveness and cost savings of open source solutions are now driving enterprise IT to explore more ways to take advantage of the power of open source in their daily business operations. In today's economy, enterprise IT has less to gain from developing and licensing software and more to gain from actively working with existing open source technology. However, the march toward open source still faces major obstacles before it becomes mainstream. In this slideshow, Travis Oliphant, CEO and founder of Continuum Analytics, outlines five challenges preventing enterprise IT from shifting to open source and tips for tackling them to keep the future of open source heading in the right direction. The road may be winding, but it will eventually lead companies to open source to help them innovate and as the way of the future. Read more Also: Latest attacks on privacy...

Security News

  • Jay Beale: Linux Security and Remembering Bastille Linux
    Security expert and co-creator of the Linux-hardening (and now Unix-hardening) project Bastille Linux. That’s Jay Beale. He’s been working with Linux, and specifically on security, since the late 1980s. The greatest threat to Linux these days? According to Beale, the thing you really need to watch out for is your Android phone, which your handset manufacturer and wireless carrier may or may not be good about updating with the latest security patches. Even worse? Applications you get outside of the controlled Google Play and Amazon environments, where who-knows-what malware may lurk. On your regular desktop or laptop Linux installation, Beale says the best security precaution you can take is encrypting your hard drive — which isn’t at all hard to do. He and I also talked a bit, toward the end, about how “the Linux community” was so tiny, once upon a time, that it wasn’t hard to know most of its major players. He also has some words of encouragement for those of you who are new to Linux and possibly a bit confused now and then. We were all new and confused once upon a time, and got less confused as we learned. Guess what? You can learn, too, and you never know where that knowledge can take you.
  • Automotive security: How safe is a next-generation car?
    The vehicles we drive are becoming increasingly connected through a variety of technologies. Features such as keyless entry and self-diagnostics are becoming commonplace. Unfortunately, they can also introduce IT security issues.
  • Let's Encrypt: Every Server on the Internet Should Have a Certificate
    The web is not secure. As of August 2016, only 45.5 percent of Firefox page loads are HTTPS, according to Josh Aas, co-founder and executive director of Internet Security Research Group. This number should be 100 percent, he said in his talk called “Let’s Encrypt: A Free, Automated, and Open Certificate Authority” at LinuxCon North America. Why is HTTPS so important? Because without security, users are not in control of their data and unencrypted traffic can be modified. The web is wonderfully complex and, Aas said, it’s a fool’s errand to try to protect this certain thing or that. Instead, we need to protect everything. That’s why, in the summer of 2012, Aas and his friend and co-worker Eric Rescorla decided to address the problem and began working on what would become the Let’s Encrypt project.
  • OpenSSL 1.1 Released With Many Changes
    OpenSSL 1.1.0 was released today as a major update to this free software cryptography and SSL/TLS toolkit. In addition to OpenSSL 1.1 rolling out a new build system and new security levels and support for pipelining and a new threading API, security additions to OpenSSL 1.1 include adding the AFALG engine, support for ChaChao20 in libcrypto/libssl, scrypto algorithm support, and support for X25519, among many other additions.
  • Is Windows ​10’s ‘Hidden Administrator Account’ a security risk? [Ed: Damage control from Microsoft Jack (Jack Schofield) because Microsoft Windows is vulnerable by design]