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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's highlights: srlinuxx 17/06/2013 - 2:27am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 16/06/2013 - 9:37pm
Story Ladies and Gentlemen, SCO v. IBM Is Officially Reopened srlinuxx 16/06/2013 - 6:16am
Story NSA Has Legitimate Code Running in Linux srlinuxx 16/06/2013 - 1:13am
Story The Linux Setup - Gregor Herrmann, Debian Developer srlinuxx 16/06/2013 - 1:11am
Story Updated Debian 7: 7.1 released srlinuxx 16/06/2013 - 1:09am
Story Mint 15 on Nvidia-ed laptop - Perfection? srlinuxx 16/06/2013 - 1:07am
Story Mir Still Causing Concerns By Ubuntu Derivatives srlinuxx 16/06/2013 - 1:06am
Blog entry Getting any distro to work on an Acer S3 feels like its 2002 again.. fieldyweb 15/06/2013 - 11:35pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 15/06/2013 - 4:55pm

When open-source GUIs attack: The Blender example

Filed under
Software

computerworld: TDT 3D has put together a comparison of six 3D modeling tools. Many readers got quite worked up about one of the tools, Blender 3D 2.45. What was the problem? Certainly not the price.

Got new hardware? Linux makes it easy.

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox blogs: I have been slowly, piece by piece, assimilating components to create a new Locutus that will be more than just a bitzer but a new version of itself. I put all the parts together and, I was presented exactly what I had before. The same soul in a different body.

Ubuntu 7.10: Tweaks make it smoother running

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogbeebe: It didn't take much to get rhea running smoothly again after the upgrade from 7.04 to 7.10. The first thing I did was ignore the shiny shiny and turn of all visual effects. That seemed to help tremendously. I then began to change the desktop elements into something I liked that also was reasonably light on the system:

The future of Unix Part 1: IBRS' view

Filed under
OS

searchcio.com.au: In these interviews, TechTarget ANZ's Ian Yates speak with analyst Kevin McIsaac from IBRS, Sun Microsystems' Laurie Wong and IBM's Phil MacLouchlainn. The hypothetical is the death of Unix at the hands of Linux.

Most Anticipated Release

openSUSE 10.3
45% (271 votes)
Mandriva 2008
13% (76 votes)
*Ubuntu 7.10
33% (196 votes)
Fedora 8
6% (35 votes)
Gentoo 2007.1
4% (25 votes)
Total votes: 603

Review: openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

the distrogue: After some assorted mishaps with some preview releases of openSUSE 10.3, it's finally stable enough for production use. And while I'm pleased with the result, I can't get rid of the feeling that the openSUSE team can do better.

Pluggable Security

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I think the decision to merge Smack is something that needs to be considered in the wider context of overall security architecture," suggested James Morris following Andrew Morton's recent comment.

Also: Virtual Compound Page Support
And: Andrew Morton's 2.6.24 merge plans

Only 5% of UK firms always choose open source

Filed under
OSS

CBR: Only 5% of the 300 IT executives surveyed by Computer Business Review said they always opted for open source whenever possible, while three-quarters said it depended on the individual project. One in four of the companies had made it policy to avoid open source.

YaST Survey Started

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: We have just published a survey on YaST, our systems management and installation framework. If you use any of the distributions openSUSE, SUSE Linux, SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, I encourage you to participate in our survey to support us improving YaST.

Arch Leadership

Filed under
Linux

archlinux.org: I plan to step down as leader of Arch Linux and pass the torch. The reason for this is that I do not have the time to devote towards a leadership role in a project the size of Arch Linux, and Arch deserves someone who does. It needs some work, it needs some unification, and it needs someone at the helm who can devote a lot of time to it.

SamePlace: A Jabber client for Firefox

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you spend most of your computing life in Firefox, it makes sense to consolidate other online activities in your browser. There are extensions that can help you to do just that: you can manage your bookmarks with the del.icio.us extension, chat on IRC channels using Chatzilla, and read RSS feeds in Sage. Jabber instant messaging users have their own extension: the SamePlace, a nifty IM client that, besides the basic Jabber functionality, offers a few unique and useful features.

Linux Application Hardening

Filed under
Linux

sys-con.com: When we talk about Linux hardening, we typically mean runtime application hardening to improve application reliability, leading to expected and predictable execution despite undesirable operating conditions.

Driving Linux

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Among the issues that Linux users, hardware and peripheral vendors may run into when trying to get into Linux is the issue of driver availability. Enter the Linux Driver Project. Led by Novell staffer Greg Kroah-Hartman, the group is aiming to get drivers and Linux users aligned.

How much is Microsoft's patent protection worth?

Filed under
Linux

matt asay: For those who can't be bought, just how much protection are you missing? Not very much, it seems to me, and to a range of open-source legal experts I e-mailed to solicit their opinions.

Basic Linux Tips and Tricks, Part 1

Filed under
Linux

linux planet: This article is intended for people who have some computer expertise, even if it's Windows-only. At a minimum, you should be comfortable with the MS-DOS command line in Windows and have done a bit of Windows Registry editing to give you some experience with configuration files.

New Partnership Extends Linux Foundation’s Work with Japanese Developers

Filed under
Linux

PR: The Linux Foundation and the Information-technology Promotion Agency today announced the signing of a collaboration agreement. The LF and IPA will work together to accelerate adoption of Linux and open source software in areas of technology development, standardization and legal activities.

Ease of Use: But For Who?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: I think Linux developers are targeting the wrong people. I think, in a number of instances, Linux developers are targeting themselves as the key user group for their tools. What made me come to that conclusion might surprise you.

FOSS: The major players in Linux and free- and open-source software

Filed under
OSS

iTWire: As free and open source software receives greater attention and recognition, several companies and packages are emerging as clear leaders and important influencers as well as visionaries that are sure to make a mark in the very near future. Here are my picks for who’s making a mark today and tomorrow on the FOSS world.

Open Source Gaming Review: Assault Cube 0.92

Filed under
Gaming

raiden's realm: Assault Cube is an open source 3d shooter done in the old school deathmatch style of gameplay, but with much newer graphics. Gameplay is especially good in this game due to the way it's implemented.

Watching Your Power Consumption With Powertop On Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

Powertop is a command-line tool released by Intel that shows you the power consumption of the applications running on your system. It works best on notebooks with Intel mobile processors and can help you find out the programs that put a strain on your notebook battery.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Atom Installer
    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage. In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.
  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More
    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More
    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution. Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • IOTA: IoT revolutionized with a Ledger
    Ever since the introduction of digital money, the world quickly came to realize how dire and expensive the consequences of centralized systems are. Not only are these systems incredibly expensive to maintain, they are also “single points of failures” which expose a large number of users to unexpected service interruptions, fraudulent activities and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious hackers. Thanks to Blockchain, which was first introduced through Bitcoin in 2009, the clear benefits of a decentralized and “trustless” transactional settlement system became apparent. No longer should expensive trusted third parties be used for handling transactions, instead, the flow of money should be handled in a direct, Peer-to-Peer fashion. This concept of a Blockchain (or more broadly, a distributed ledger) has since then become a global phenomenon attracting billions of dollars in investments to further develop the concept.
  • Return Home and Unify: My Case for Unity 8
  • Can netbooks be cool again?
    Earlier this week, my colleague Chaim Gartenberg covered a laptop called the GPD Pocket, which is currently being funded on Indiegogo. As Chaim pointed out, the Pocket’s main advantage is its size — with a 7-inch screen, the thing is really, really small — and its price, a reasonable $399. But he didn’t mention that the Pocket is the resurrection of one of the most compelling, yet fatally flawed, computing trends of the ‘00s: the netbook. So after ten years, are netbooks finally cool again? That might be putting it too strongly, but I’m willing to hope.

Linux Devices

  • Compact, rugged module runs Linux or Android on Apollo Lake
    Ubiqcomm’s 95 x 95mm, Apollo Lake-based “COM-AL6C” COM offers 4K video along with multiple SATA, USB, GbE, and PCIe interfaces, plus -40 to 85°C operation. Ubiqconn Technology Inc. has announced a “COM-AL6C” COM Express Type 6 Compact form factor computer-on-module built around Intel’s Apollo Lake processors and designed to withstand the rigors of both fixed and mobile industrial applications. The module offers a choice among three Intel Apollo Lake processors: the quad-core Atom x5-E3930, quad-core x5-E3940, and dual-core x7-E3950, which are clocked at up to 2.0GHz burst and offer TDPs from 6.5 to 12 Watts.
  • Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266
    To get started with IoT (the Internet of Things), your device needs, well, an Internet connection. Base Arduino microcontrollers don't have Internet connectivity by default, so you either need to add Ethernet, Wi-Fi shields, or adapters to them, or buy an Arduino that has built-in Internet connectivity. In addition to complexity, both approaches add cost and consume the already-precious Arduino flash RAM for program space, which limits what you can do. Another approach is to use a Raspberry Pi or similar single-board computer that runs a full-blown operating system like Linux. The Raspberry Pi is a solid choice in many IoT use cases, but it is often overkill when all you really want to do is read a sensor and send the reading up to a server in the cloud. Not only does the Raspberry Pi potentially drive up the costs, complexity, and power consumption of your project, but it is running a full operating system that needs to be patched, and it has a much larger attack surface than a simple microcontroller. When it comes to IoT devices and security, simpler is better, so you can spend more time making and less time patching what you already made.
  • Blinkenlights!
  • Blinkenlights, part 2
  • Blinkenlights, part 3
  • [Older] Shmoocon 2017: The Ins And Outs Of Manufacturing And Selling Hardware
    Every day, we see people building things. Sometimes, useful things. Very rarely, this thing becomes a product, but even then we don’t hear much about the ins and outs of manufacturing a bunch of these things or the economics of actually selling them. This past weekend at Shmoocon, [Conor Patrick] gave the crowd the inside scoop on selling a few hundred two factor authentication tokens. What started as a hobby is now a legitimate business, thanks to good engineering and abusing Amazon’s distribution program.
  • 1.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users NEVER use a PC, 200 Million PC Internet Users never use a mobile phone. Understanding the 3.5 Billion Internet Total Audience
    As I am working to finish the 2017 Edition of the TomiAhonen Almanac (last days now) I always get into various updates of numbers, that remind me 'I gotta tell this story'.. For example the internet user numbers. We have the December count by the ITU for year 2016, that says the world has now 3.5 Billion internet users in total (up from 3.2 Billion at the end of year 2015). So its no 'drama' to know what is 'that' number. The number of current internet total users is yes, 3.5 Billion, almost half of the planet's total population (47%).