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Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Taking Ubuntu 14.10 for a ride Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 5:40am
Story 10 best Linux distros: which one is right for you? Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 5:32am
Story Too Many Forks, the Right Distro, and Reason for Fedora Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 5:29am
Story HarrisData Supports Linux with new 'AppsInHD' Platform Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 5:24am
Story Ubuntu Laptop Buying Guide Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 5:21am
Story Hackable drone controller runs Linux Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 4:52am
Story Trisquel 7.0 LTS Belenos Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 1:59am
Story UbuTricks 14.11.03 Released with Support for 5 More Apps, Cinnamon PPA Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 1:56am
Story Nexus 9 Review: A Powerful Tablet…for Android Die-Hards Only Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 1:44am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 9:28pm

In search of bigger, stronger calculators

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If I had had SpeedCrunch or Qalculate! during high school, finishing homework really would've been child's play. From breaking down complex algebraic equations, to solving your calculus problems, to performing geometric computations and providing statistical answers, SpeedCrunch and Qalculate! are tools that offer quick solutions to difficult questions.

Debian postpones Lenny, calls for help

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: Debian, the granddaddy of Linux distributions, is in trouble. Its planned September release date for Lenny - its latest release - has come and gone and there is still no sign of the new product. It seems the Debian team is battling “too many release critical bugs” to make Lenny viable. And now the team is calling for help from the community to squash the remainder of these bugs.

Andreas Jaeger: Retiring from the openSUSE Board

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger: I have served as chairperson of the openSUSE board the last year and would like to announce that I decided to pass the honours on for the next election period.

Pentagon: Open source good to go

Filed under
OSS

gcn.com: Military IT folks wondering if their use of Apache, Perl, Linux and other open source software is copacetic with the brass will soon get some answers from the Defense Department's Office of the Chief Information Officer.

Going to a Linux or Open-Source Show?

Filed under
OSS

practical-tech.com: Even before our recent economic crash, flying has become increasingly more costly. So have hotels, the price of gas, on and on it goes. Can you afford to go to a show? Can your company afford to send you to a show? The answer for most of us and our businesses is increasingly ‘no.’

Opera maverick is still making waves

Filed under
Software

theinquirer.net: TRIVIA QUIZ: Which browser was the first to implement tabs, integrated search, zoom, saved sessions, and runs on mobile phones and TVs? Hint: it wasn't Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome.

Red Hat tells Wall Street it wants Main Street

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Commercial Linux distributor Red Hat hosted its annual analyst day in New York today, and as Wall Street continues to hemorrhage, the company couldn't have picked a gloomier time for the occasion.

Hands on: How to get more from Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software

pcw.co.uk: Following the recent releases of two popular Linux distributions, Fedora 9 and Ubuntu 8.04 LTS, we are looking at a couple of additional pieces of software you might want to install onto a fresh installation of either.

Why Mono and Samba Are Patently Different

Filed under
Software

computerworlduk.com/blogs: To understand the principal difference between Samba and Mono, we need to explore what they do, and how they do it.

Open source in a time of recession

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet: No one questions the fact of recession any more, although we have yet to confirm a single quarter without growth, let alone two. Tech hates recessions, even though tech booms start at the bottom of them. Just as open source itself emerged from the wreckage of the dot bomb during, what — the early aughts?

Sidux grows on you

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Sidux, a relatively new desktop Linux distribution, is based on Sid, the unstable developmental branch of Debian. The developers strive for an easy-to-install and easy-to-use modern Debian derivative, and pride themselves on remaining true to the principles and values of the Debian project. Despite a few inconveniences, I like Sidux a bit more each time I use it.

Puppy Linux Live Trumps LinuxDefender In More Ways Than One

Filed under
Linux

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: More than a few people wrote in to let me know about other interesting "live" distro's of Linux after our post on using LinuxDefender Live CD to Fix NTFS problems ran.

Debian Project News - October 8th, 2008

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 12th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Some of the topics covered in this issue include: Bits from the DPL, What you can do for Lenny, and 500,000th bug reported.

10 questions to ask before migrating to Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: With the unsure economy and Microsoft Vista failing to gain overwhelming acceptance, many people are considering a migration to Linux. Although I find Linux to be far superior to Windows, certain criteria MUST be considered before making the switch.

Opera 9.60 released

Filed under
Software

Opera today released a new version of its desktop browser, Opera 9.60. Highlights include Feed preview, Speed enhancements, and Mail improvements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Torvalds talks about his brand new blog

  • Does Linux suck or is it lusers who suck? (netbook returns)
  • Biggest Enemy Of Linux Netbooks Isn't Windows - It's Expectations
  • Microsoft’s Cloud Computing: The Movie
  • Google is NOT your friend
  • New Linux Broadcom Wi-Fi drivers arrive
  • Quick Reviews: Linux, a n00b's POV
  • Opening Up ISO's Can of Worms
  • Wizbit: a Linux filesystem with distributed version control
  • How to Make a PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniMe Flash drive in Windows
  • Red Hat looks to mainstream markets for growth
  • Buddi - Personal budget software for Ubuntu Desktop
  • Open source does not mean 'open to pilfer trademarks,' suggests Google
  • NH Hoteles: Customers stay for less with open source
  • Open Source vs. Proprietary Intranet Software, Part 3
  • Ubuntu Podcast Episode#8
  • Mozilla Developer News 10/7
  • Red Hat To Adopt Qumranet Desktop Virtualization Products
  • Forget the damn netbooks. Can “Windows” replace Windows?

Linux distros lead jumps from Sun

theregister.co.uk: Sun Microsystems has lost a key individual responsible for getting its aspiring open-source software included in leading Linux distributions. Barton George has quit Sun after 13 years.

NPX-9000 UMPC is inexpensive but underpowered

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linux.com: The wave of cheap netbooks, mini laptops, or ultra-mobile PCs has crested with the cheapest yet, the NPX-9000 from Carapelli. Though it was announced in July with great fanfare at a price of £65 (or $110), it has yet to appear on the vendor's Web site. But we got our hands on one of the first units to escape from the factory and put it through its paces.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Forwarding Ports over an active SSH connection

  • How to: secure pronounceable passwords in Ubuntu with passook
  • Using the Linksys WUSB54GC (ralink rt73) Wireless usb adaptor in Linux
  • How to rip a dvd in Ubuntu (as .avi)
  • How to install and configure Rancid with Postfix on Debian

NVIDIA 177.80 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Over the course of the past few months we have seen several NVIDIA Linux drivers that have all been marked as beta with the last official release appearing in April. Today though NVIDIA has released the 177.80 Linux driver, which is an official update and christens the changes made with the 177.67, 177.68, 170.70, 177.76, and 177.78 beta drivers.

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More in Tux Machines

Intel's "Utter Garbage" Code Bricks and Delays Linux, Torvalds Furious

today's leftovers

  • 20 Years of LWN
    Back in mid-1997, your editor (Jonathan Corbet) and Liz Coolbaugh were engaged in a long-running discussion on how to trade our nice, stable, reliably paying jobs for a life of uncertainty, poverty, and around-the-clock work. Not that we thought of it in those terms, naturally. We eventually settled on joining Red Hat's nascent "support partner" program; while we were waiting for it to get started, we decided to start a weekly newsletter as a side project — not big and professional like the real press — to establish ourselves in the community. Thus began an amazing journey that has just completed its 20th year. After some time thinking about what we wanted to do and arguing about formats, we published our first edition on January 22, 1998. It covered a number of topics, including the devfs controversy, the pesky 2GB file-size limit on the ext2 filesystem, the use of Linux on Alpha to render scenes in the film "Titanic", the fact that Red Hat had finally hired a full-time quality-assurance person and launched the Red Hat Advanced Development Labs, and more. We got almost no feedback on this issue, though, perhaps because we didn't tell anybody that we had created it.
  •  
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.4 | Ubuntu 17.10 Revisited
    Canonical revised Ubuntu 17.10 with the new 17.10.1. Time to take another look…
  • PodCTL #22 – Highway to Helm
    One of the reasons that Kubernetes has gained so much traction in the marketplace is because it is flexible enough to allow innovation to happen all around the core APIs. One area where that has happened is in application package management, specifically with the Helm project.
  • LibreELEC Linux OS Will Get Meltdown and Spectre Patches with Next Major Release
    The development team behind the Kodi-based LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source HTPC operating system for embedded systems and PCs released LibreELEC 8.2.3. LibreELEC 8.2.3 is the third maintenance update to the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series of the Just enough Operating System (JeOS), which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center. It's here a month after the LibreELEC 8.2.2 point release to address a few issues.
  • openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week
    The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26. The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3. “We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”
  • French Gender-Neutral Translation for Roundcube
    Here's a quick blog post to tell the world I'm now doing a French gender-neutral translation for Roundcube.
  •  
  • This Oil Major Has a Supercomputer the Size of a Soccer Field
    Big Oil is now Big Tech. So big, in fact, that Eni SpA’s new supercomputer is the size of a soccer field. In the multimillion-dollar pursuit of the world’s most powerful computers, the Italian explorer says it’s taken the lead. Its new machine, located outside Milan, will scan for oil and gas reservoirs deep below the Earth over thousands of miles. “This is where the company’s heart is, where we hold our most delicate data and proprietary technology,” Eni Chief Executive Officer Claudio Descalzi said in an interview on Thursday.

Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.