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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 05 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Zorin OS 4 reviewed srlinuxx 08/01/2011 - 3:30am
Story Waiting (im)patiently srlinuxx 08/01/2011 - 2:02am
Story Open source gaming srlinuxx 08/01/2011 - 2:00am
Story 15+ Useful AppIndicator Applets For Ubuntu srlinuxx 08/01/2011 - 1:57am
Story Best media players for Linux - A choice selection srlinuxx 08/01/2011 - 1:36am
Story GIMP 2.8 still needs some more time srlinuxx 08/01/2011 - 1:34am
Story Today I Booted into Windows and Now I'm Mentally Deranged srlinuxx 07/01/2011 - 10:36pm
Story When trouble strikes, who speaks for open source? srlinuxx 07/01/2011 - 10:34pm
Story Ubuntu Adds Sparkle to Nufront Laptops at CES srlinuxx 07/01/2011 - 10:33pm
Story Cedega To Be Replaced By GameTree Linux Software srlinuxx 07/01/2011 - 10:31pm

The Perfect Setup - CentOS 4.4 (32-bit)

Filed under
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up a CentOS 4.4 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.). This tutorial is written for the 32-bit version of CentOS 4.4, but should apply to the 64-bit version with very little modifications as well.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: The Penguin Plunge

Filed under
Linux

Enterprise Unix Roundup recently spoke with Amy Niersbach, platform architect, business and information services, for the city of Chicago. She outlined how and why the decision was made to migrate two of the city's systems to Red Hat Linux.

A first look at the Linux friendly Google Docs & Spreadsheets project

Filed under
Google

All netizens would by now be aware of Google re-launching its online Spreadsheet and Writely Document products as an integrated product at docs.google.com. This is a first look at what is in store for people who intend to use this Google product.

KDE 3.5.5 Released

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Project today announced the immediate availability of KDE 3.5.5, a maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop for GNU/Linux and other UNIXes.

Interview: Gael Duval

Filed under
Interviews

A few weeks ago, Gael Duval lifted the veil of secrecy surrounding his new project a little bit by 'leaking' some screenshots and information. Obviously, a lot of questions remained, and hence we contacted Gael Duval in order to ask him some basic questions about Ulteo.

Quicktips - How to make your fonts so smooth you’ll cry

Filed under
HowTos

Here’s a great tip picked up from Zenwhen over at the Ubuntu Forums for making your fonts super-smooth. There’s a huge amount of difference here, so much so that even my bad 80’s Metal font looks nice. Note that this was done with Gnome in Ubuntu 6.06, but should work with KDE as well.

Full Tip.

SLAX v5.1.8 LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

SLAX, our favorite mini LiveCD at Phoronix, has reached version 5.1.8. Like usual, they have their various SLAX editions such as KillBill, Server, Popcorn, and Frodo. SLAX Standard v5.1.8 features KDE 3.5.4, recompiled with some Slackware 11.0 fixes, better handling of booting from USB devices, and added slaxsave.zip to the SLAX CD.

Complete Story

Mandriva readies for global installfest

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva, makers of the popular Linux distribution, are to hold a global Linux installfest later this month.

Automatic/Dynamic configuration of hostnames for rolling out labs

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I was given the task of rolling out a number of PCs running Linux for a student lab. The roll out isn't complete yet, but I thought that this trick was so nice for lab based environments that I'd use it to try my hand at a debian-administration article.

Moore's law is alive and kicking

Filed under
Hardware

LAST YEAR was the 30th anniversary of Moore's Law, Intel founder Gordon Moore's prediction that the number of transistors on a chip would double about every two years. A lot of learned researchers have since explained why Moore's Law was ending. And yet, it hasn't.

Baby steps with The GIMP

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HowTos

Have you been planning on getting around to learning how to use the GIMP someday? Well now that the GIMP has had its tenth anniversary, it’s about time to start. In this article, I will walk you step by step through the process of making a web banner using the GIMP. Hopefully this kickstart will encourage you to do more playing on your own.

Mandriva 2007: Why is this distribution still around?

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

Naming distribution versions after a calendar year sounds familiar to me. I'm thinking of Windows 95, of course. And my experience with French distribution Mandriva 2007 brought me back to those frustrating times I used to have with Microsoft's decade-old offering.

Beefing up DokuWiki with plugins

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HowTos

Desktop applications such as Firefox, Thunderbird, and the GIMP are not the only ones that can use extensions and plugins for added functionality -- some Web-based programs can too. DokuWiki, for example, is a great wiki system by itself, but since it can accept plugins, you can easily add some nifty features to it.

Agreement Gives All Libyan Kids Laptops

Filed under
Hardware

The government of Libya reached an agreement with an American nonprofit group to provide inexpensive laptop computers to all of its 1.2 million schoolchildren, The New York Times reported in Wednesday's editions.

OSDL links battling Linux factions

Filed under
Linux

The Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) has released version 1.0 of its Project Portland application to link rival Linux technologies.

Users and Groups Administration in Linux

Filed under
OS
Linux
HowTos

The user information is stored in the system /etc/passwd and /etc/shadow files, and that additionally, group membership information is stored in the /etc/group file. The update-passwd tool keeps the entries in these master files in sync on all Debian systems

Read Full article here

The unique relationship between Hollywood Movies and Linux

Filed under
Linux

Quite often, we speculate about Linux grabbing a major share of the desktop PC market. But it seems the film industry are heavy users of Linux, and applications that run on Linux which include both open source and closed source custom made software.

OpenBSD creator criticizes OLPC

Filed under
OSS

Last week, OpenBSD founder Theo de Raadt released to the public an e-mail he sent to various developers affiliated with the OLPC project in which he criticizes the developers for signing non-disclosure agreements to gain access to documentation that describes the proprietary firmware used in the wireless networking hardware included in the OLPC prototype.

Book Review: Building Web Sites With PHP-Nuke

Filed under
Reviews

The book features plenty of diagrams and screen shots (which are of the monochrome variety). While the author doesn't assume a programmer audience, he doesn't make the mistake of talking down either. The writing is friendly and commendably clear.

How I Screwed Up Rpmdrake 2007

Filed under
MDV
Humor

It was a nice evening. I started Rpmdrake 2007 "the long way" (Applications -> System -> Configuration -> Packaging -> Install, Remove & Update Software), then I looked into what video & audio applications could I add from PLF (with all the codecs).

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More in Tux Machines

Questions and answers: Ubuntu bq tablet

I will say this. So far I've used the Ubuntu tablet for over a week and prefer using it over any other tablet...even with its quirks. In fact, it's the first mobile device that has me comfortable being away from my trusty desktop environment. Having mobile versions of The GIMP and LibreOffice alone is worth the price of admission. It's not perfect (far from it), but it's a sleek, mobile version of Linux that works incredibly well, especially considering how young it is. Read more

Today and Yesterday in Techrights

LibreOffice 5.0.6 Open-Source Office Suite Is Now Available for Download

We were informed just a few minutes ago by The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli about the immediate availability for download of the LibreOffice 5.0.6 "Still" open-source office suite. Read more

today's leftovers

  • M$ Kicks Second Most Loyal Users In The Teeth [Ed: context below]
  • Windows 10 updates are now ruining pro-gaming streams
    Forcing a gaming PC to update mid-game during a livestream to up to 130,000 followers isn’t best advert for the software
  • Containers Used on over Half of New Apps in Production
    Shippable, the Seattle-based producer of a continuous delivery platform for software developers, recently quizzed 300 coders in the U.S. and found that more than half of them (52 percent) are using Docker or other container technologies to deploy their new applications in production. Fourteen percent are using containers for development and testing purposes. Indicating that 2016 is the year that containers cement their hold on the enterprise, a whopping 89 percent of respondents told the startup that they were very or somewhat likely to increase their use of the DevOps-enabling technology within the next 12 months. Developers are turning to containers when speed is of the essence. Containers have helped a majority of developers (74 percent) ship new software at least 10 percent faster. Eight percent are enjoying a 50-percent boost.
  • Divide et Impera
    But for those committed long term to an on premise model, new tactics are required. In a market that is struggling with fragmentation, solutions must become less fragmented. In some cases this will mean traditional formal partnerships, but these can be difficult to sustain as they require time and capital resource investments from companies that are certain to be short on one if not both. History suggests, however, that informal aggregations can be equally successful: the Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP combination, as one example, achieved massive success – success that continues to this day.
  • gNewSense 4.0 released
    I hereby announce the release of gNewSense 4, codenamed Ucclia. It's based on a solid Debian, modified to respect the Free Software Foundation's and is available for 3 architectures: i386, amd64 and mipsel (Lemote Yeeloong).
  • IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux Firewall OS Lands More OpenSSL Security Fixes
    Yesterday we reported news on the release of the IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution, which brought many security patches and improvements, along with updated components. Today, May 5, 2016, we're informing our readers about the immediate availability of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102, a small maintenance build to the stable IPFire 2.19 distribution that updates the OpenSSL package to version 1.0.2h, fixing a total of six vulnerabilities discovered upstream.
  • Samsung’s Artik 10, starts shipping in the US for $150
    Samsung’s Artik development boards are finally reaching hands of consumers in the US. The Artik development boards which were unveiled back in May 2015 at the IoT World 2015 have taken quite a lot of time to become consumer ready and take over the likes of the new Raspberry Pi 3, Pine 64,etc which have revolutionized the DIY Maker community with the “PC ona board” concept. And now, the Artik 10- the most powerful board from the Artik series is all set to intensify the ongoing competition. Priced at $150, which is more than what one would pay for 4 $35 priced Raspberry Pis, Samsung will sure have to do a lot to of work to impress the buyers and build a community around it.
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • ​Why I Hate Security, Computers, and the Entire Modern Banking System
    I woke up yesterday to find that a string of mysterious credit card payments had wiped out my checking account. I spent the next few hours as a prisoner of the phone tree, being interrogated on the transactions that I wanted answers about. No, I did not have a Banana Republic credit card. I didn’t have a Capital One credit card either. And I had no idea who Michael was, or what he was doing with all my money. The woman on the other end of the phone flagged transaction after transaction. For each one, she read me a long, pre-written paragraph of instructions and disclaimers—verbatim, even if she had repeated the same words just before. “Okay, so,” I said, when she was finally done. “It looks like this person is paying off credit cards through the web. What… am I supposed to do about that? What information do they have that lets them do it?” “It looks like they have your routing number and account number,” she told me. “You should close this account and get a new one.” I thanked her and hung up. Then my head exploded.