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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 23 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why Android's Winning The Battle Right Now Rianne Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 8:46pm
Story Linux Kernel Source Code of BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition Published on GitHub Rianne Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 8:27pm
Story Google makes deploying software on its cloud a trivial task Rianne Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 7:39pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.19.3 Arrives with ARM, ARM64, and IPv6 Fixes, Many Updated Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 7:30pm
Story The Linux desktop battle (and why it matters) Rianne Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 7:07pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 6:05pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 6:05pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 6:04pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 6:03pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/03/2015 - 6:03pm

Top 10 Open Source Gaming Projects To Revive

Filed under
Software

freegamer.blogspot: The great thing about open source is a project can never become extinct - there is always a chance of it being brought back to life either by the original authors who re-find their motivation, by new contributors who see the potential, or a mixture of both.

Open Enterprise Interview: Mike Olson, Cloudera

Filed under
Interviews

computerworlduk.com: Yesterday, I wrote about the launch of the open source company Cloudera. Olson explains the background to the company, and to Hadoop, the software it is based on: what it does, and why business might want to use it; he talks about his company's services and business model, and why he thinks cloud computing is neither a threat nor an opportunity for open source.

Where Ubuntu Fits Between Apple, Microsoft

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: The past 48 hours have been filled with drama for me. My MacBook Pro died on March 15, forcing me to scramble all of my blogging and business efforts over to a System76’s Pangolin Performance laptop running Ubuntu.

Introduction to the xmonad Tiling Window Manager

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: What good is having a large display if you’re constantly rearranging windows to fit them on the screen? I got tired of try to fit a web browser with other smaller windows and decided to try xmonad, a tiling window manager that could do this for me.

Top 10 Reasons I’ll Never Use Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntuproductivity.com: It’s too inexpensive. In fact, paying is only an option & I don’t feel compelled to pay for it. It’s just not as fun owning an operating system I don’t have to pay for.

Opera puts browsers in Turbo mode

Filed under
Software

news.zdnet.com: Browser maker Opera Software has released a test version of software called Opera Turbo, designed to use compression and the company's own servers to speed browsing over slow Internet connections.

Also: Web browsers battle at festival

ASUS Eee Top Fails With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: ASUS is among the few tier-one hardware vendors that understands Linux. Of the dozens of ASUS products we have tested over the years, it is hard to remember a product from ASUS that did not work well with Linux.

Upgrade Ubuntu Linux to Jaunty Jackalope the super-easy way

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ubuntu 9.04, Jaunty Jackalope, is being released next month. What does this mean for your existing Ubuntu setup? Fear not, here is the super simple way to go forwards without reformatting, reinstalling or losing data in any way.

Also: Ubuntu 9.04's New Themes

Talking Community With Ubuntu's Jono Bacon

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

ostatic.com/blog: This week I had a unique opportunity to talk with Ubuntu's community manager, Jono Bacon. As community manager, Bacon is the Ubuntu community's connection to Canonical.

An Open Letter To Foresight Linux

Filed under
Linux

linux-blog.org: I have decided - after running Foresight for two months - to no longer use Foresight Linux on my systems. Let me say however that I found the experience interesting and dare I say - challenging.

End of the line

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe.blogspot: I'm pulling the plug in openSUSE 11.1, and in the process, on Linux in general as a home system. So, like Béranger, I'm defecting from Linux to Windows as a rational act.

Virtualization With KVM On A Debian Lenny Server

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Debian Lenny server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

Firefox New Tab: Next Iteration

Filed under
Moz/FF

labs.mozilla.com: Since releasing an experimental new tab page for Firefox a week ago, we’ve got a lot of great feedback. For the past week we’ve been using the feedback as a springboard for designing the next iteration.

Also: Firefox is still king for developers

GIMP 2.6.6 Released

Filed under
GIMP

gimp.org: GIMP 2.6.6 is a bug-fix release in the stable GIMP 2.6 series. This release contains an important fix for compiling GIMP against the recently released GTK+ 2.16.

Kicking off Debian Squeeze

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Adeodato Simó from the Debian release team has officially launched the development of the next stable release of Debian, code named "Squeeze" and has announced the general principles for its development.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Gnome Replaces Nautilus-CD-Burner With Brasero and RIP Rhythmbox

  • Save Flash-videos in KDE 4.2
  • Linux: The Brand
  • Linux T-Shirts. For Sale?
  • PCLinuxOS 2009 Not Diggworthy
  • Build a Web Developer PC and Enable Most Media Playback Using Ubuntu
  • Installing XBMC in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Fixing Firefox Bookmarks after a crash
  • Novell/IDC Survey Reports Interest in Linux Interoperability, Virtualization
  • Red Hat patent app sparks open source lockdown fears
  • Gushing, gossip, grapevine, gabble
  • RadioTux interview with Fedora's Max Spevack and Robert Scheck
  • Mono and Qt

The GNU/Linux Desktop: Nine Myths

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Nobody questions whether Mac OS X is ready for the desktop. With GNU/Linux, however, the story is different. For over a decade, columnists and bloggers have been explaining how GNU/Linux isn't ready for the desktop -- and, despite all the progress in the operating system over the last ten years, the arguments haven't changed much.

Testing Linux Distributions in VMWare and Parallels

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: A long time ago I used to actually use a separate computer to install and test Linux distributions. I even built some of the boxes that I used to do the testing. These days I use VMWare and Parallels to run Linux on my Macs. Why?

Readers’ Choice: Awesome Linux Apps that Need Our Attention

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: I got some very interesting comments on my post about Linux projects that need more attention, so I decided to feature a few of the readers’ recommendations.

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More in Tux Machines

DragonFlyBSD 5.2.1 Released

While DragonFlyBSD 5.3/5.4 is exciting on the performance front for those making use of the stable DragonFly operating system releases, DragonFlyBSD 5.2.1 is available this week. This is the first and perhaps only point release over DragonFly 5.2.0 that premiered back in April. DragonFlyBSD 5.2 brought stabilization work for HAMMER2 to make it ready for more users, Spectre and Meltdown kernel work, and months worth of other important updates. Read more

Do European Governments Publish Open Source Software?

From time to time I come across news articles about Governmental bodies in Europe adopting the use of Open Source Software. This seems to be a slowly increasing trend. But if European Governments make software for themselves, or are having it made for them, do they publish that software as Open Source? This was a question that came up in a meeting at one of my clients. To find an answer, I asked my friends at the FSFE NL-team and did a Quick Scan. Here are the results. The short answer: Yes, they do! The longer answer: read on. Read more

Openwashing and FOSS FUD

  • Release: The Winemakers Co-Op to Debut Collaborative Wine: Open-Source Chardonnay June 3
  • Facebook open sources Katran networking tool, outlines automation system called Vending Machine [Ed: When surveillance giants are engaging in openwashing campaigns (all the core code is secret and abuses people)...]
  • Facebook Open Sources Katran Load Balancer; Details Network Provisioning Tool
  • Security and Open Source: Open Source Components Save Time but Need to be Closely Monitored [Ed: After Black Duck, Snyk and White Source another anti-FOSS firm spreads its FUD to sell services; ads disguised as 'articles'. Many of them this month, flooding FOSS news.]
    Chris Wysopal, CTO of Veracode, said that “the universal use of components in application development means that when a single vulnerability in a single component is disclosed, that vulnerability now has the potential to impact thousands of applications – making many of them breachable with a single exploit.”.
  • Linux Redis Automated Mining For Worm Analysis and Safety Advice [Ed: Rather old an issue]
    Since Redis has not authorized the disclosure of the attack method of root authority of Linux system, because of its ease-of-use, the hacking behaviors of mining and scanning of Linux services by using this issue have been endless. Among the many cases that handle this problem to invade the server for black production, there is a class of mining that USES this problem and can automatically scan the infected machine with pnscan. The attack has always been there, but it has shown a recent trend of increasing numbers, which has been captured many times, and we've been able to do a specific analysis of it.
  • Turla cyberespionage group switched to open-source malware [Ed: Crackers share code, so let's badmouth FOSS?]
    The Turla cyberespionage group has implemented some new tactics over the last few months incorporating some open-source exploitation tools instead of relying solely on their own creations to run campaigns. ESET researchers found that starting in March the Turla has been leveraging the open-source framework Metasploit to drop the group's proprietary Mosquito backdoor. The group has periodically used open-source hacking tools for other tasks, but ESET believes the group has never before used Metasploit as a first stage backdoor.
  • A Complete Beginner’s Guide to Not Getting Hacked
    Crackers are so to speak the evil hackers. Although these very often also do not offer the possibilities in order to do justice to the descriptions of the media. Then there are the would-be hackers, also called ScriptKiddies who use themTrojan2 and pre-programmed programs to get into computers and do damage. The “Kiddie” leads is a departure from the English “kid” (child), since young people are often behind such attacks. Due to their young age and lack of experience, ScriptKiddies often do not even know what they are doing. Let me give you an example. I have seen ScriptKiddies that use methods to intrude into Windows NT Calculator tried to break into a Linux machine. ScriptKiddies are often bored teenagers who try to have fun with the first tool. These tools are usually so simply knitted that actually, each normal, somewhat educated user can serve them. [...] According to Blendrit, co-founder at Tactica “One thing is clear: this language culture is constantly evolving, and many words find their way into the media, where they have a completely different meaning. Just as our most famous word, “hacker”, has fared.”

Kata Containers 1.0

  • Kata Containers 1.0
    The 1.0 release of Kata Containers is here! Thank you to the more than 40 individuals who have contributed to the first release of Kata Containers and to developing the Kata community.
  • VM-container chimera Kata Containers emerges from lab
    The open source Kata Containers project, an effort to combine the security advantages of virtual machines with the deployment and management advantages of software-based containers, hit its 1.0 milestone on Tuesday. Forged from a merger of Intel’s Clear Containers and Hyper’s runV announced last December, Kata Containers delivers an Open Container Initiative (OCI)-compatible runtime that addresses the downside of traditional container architecture, a shared kernel.
  • Kata Containers Project Releases 1.0 to Build Secure Container Infrastructure
  • Kata Containers 1.0
  • OpenStack Makes its Open Source CI/CD Platform Available to the Wider World
    The OpenStack Foundation made Zuul, an open source continuous integration/continuous development (CI/CD) platform, into an independent project. Zuul also released version 3 of its software. Zuul was originally developed for OpenStack CI testing and has since attracted contributors and users across many different organizations, including BMW, GoDaddy, OpenLab, and Wikimedia. It’s the third project to be managed by the OpenStack Foundation, joining OpenStack and Kata Containers.