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Wednesday, 29 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Red Hat Soldiering On

Filed under
Linux

What does a good soldier do when he's outnumbered and outmaneuvered? He calls in reinforcements, of course. That's why Red Hat is beefing up its troops for the coming campaign, at the expense of giving up some ground today.

Firefox Making Sparks In The UK

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox the open source browser from Mozilla is gaining ground on Microsoft's Internet Explorer in the UK according to the latest findings from Nielsen//NetRatings. They have increased their market share by 768 percent since September 2004. Firefox is the browser of choice for 12 percent of the UK.

OpenOffice Base: Converting data and files from Access

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice's Base tool provides an open source alternative to proprietary Microsoft Access. But if you need to use both, it's nice to be able to move data back and forth between applications. In this tip, OpenOffice expert and instructor Solveig Haugland explains how to convert Access files to OpenOffice. She also describes a workaround for changing field orders and discusses how to group items in OpenOffice.

Pragmatic Questions about Binary-Only Drivers

Filed under
Linux

The perpetual debate over the legality, practicality, and wisdom of using, distributing, producing, and supporting binary-only drivers flared up again recently. This issue raises passionate debates, and those debates often walk the lines of a false dilemma: freedom versus pragmatism.

Quake cuts off much of Asia Internet

Filed under
Web

Internet and phone services have been disrupted across much of Asia on Wednesday after an earthquake damaged undersea cables, leaving one of the world's most tech-savvy regions in a virtual blackout.

AIX 5L LDAP user management: Active Directory client support

Filed under
News

Get an overview of the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol- (LDAP) related enhancements in the AIX 5L operating system V5.3 TL5 update. This lets clients configure and manage multiple systems with a single set of user identity configuration information, and it simplifies system administration.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to View Hidden Files and Folders in Ubuntu File Browser

  • Change the GRUB Menu Timeout on Ubuntu
  • Show the GRUB Menu by Default on Ubuntu
  • Antivirus on Ubuntu with Avast!
  • How-to get your removable device mounted under an explicit and persistent name
  • Using the Root Account on Debian
  • Creating Filesystems in Linux

  • Rebuilding the Directory for TexInfo
  • Using Gnonlin with GStreamer and Python

  • Configure Wireless From The Command Line

Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the Christmas period I installed Ubuntu 5.10 (Edgy Eft) on my MacBook under Parallels, and I have to say that it’s the most likeable Linux distribution I’ve tried so far.

The Ultimate Distro

Filed under
Linux

The name of Gaël Duval's new distro, Ulteo, with its hint of the word "ultimate", smacks of a certain ambition. But Duval probably means it in the sense that it is the last distribution you will ever need to install, because thereafter it will "self-upgrade automatically," as the announcement of the alpha release put it. Ease-of-use has been a constant theme in Duval's work.

Ubuntu 6.10 (EdgyEft) vs. SUSE 10.1 on an HP Pavilion dv2000

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Lee commented that the HP Pavilion dv2000 is well supported by Ubuntu/Kubuntu Linux 6.10 (aka EdgyEft). In particular, he mentioned that sound worked, and the extra row of blue-lit multimedia buttons at the top works. That sounded very interesting, so I decided to have a try. I use Gnome, not KDE, as my desktop, so I chose to look at Ubuntu, not Kubuntu (which Lee uses).

Finally user-friendly virtualization for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The upcoming 2.6.20 Linux kernel is bringing a nice virtualization framework for all virtualization fans out there. It's called KVM, short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine. This article tries to explain how it all works, in theory and practice, together with some simple benchmarks.

Linux - Room for Improvement

Filed under
Linux

This month's column was supposed to be a look at openSUSE 10.2. Here's what I have to report thus far: openSUSE 10.2 is the only distribution that has stubbornly refused to install on my current test machine, an older Dell Dimension 8100 desktop. But one obstacle has led to another, and so far I'm nowhere near the finish line. Here's my current wish list.

Editing Debian alternatives graphically with galternatives

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever been tinkering under the hood only to discover later that you blew up one of your defaults? Say your default web-browser, so that when you click a link from email it opens Firefox instead of Konqueror or vice-versa. Well I know I have. Here we'll look at how to fix this, graphically.

Mark Shuttleworth: Plan, execute, DELIVER

Filed under
Ubuntu

We are a somewhat chaotic crowd, the software libre army. Thousands of projects (hundreds of thousands, if you consider Sourceforge as a reference point). Hundreds of thousands of contributing developers from virtually every country and timezone. We are a very loosely coupled bunch.

Gameforge get rights for Saga of Ryzom

Filed under
Gaming

Mediabiz reports that the German publisher Gameforge got all rights for Saga of Ryzom from the French game developer Nevrax. Nevrax will be merged with the new founded Gameforge SARL located in Paris.

Google Toolbar 3.0 beta improves browsing experience

Filed under
Software

The Google Toolbar 3 (GT3) beta for Firefox, released earlier this month, includes a slew of new features, including bookmarks, integration with Google Apps, and customizable buttons. I tested the toolbar with Firefox 2.0 and Flock 0.7.9. Once I had it installed, I signed out of Google services and signed in using the Google Toolbar sign-in feature

Why Microsoft/Novell is good for Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Being aware, as I am, of Microsoft's monopolisation endeavours, coupled with working in a Linux world inherently mistrustful of the software giant, it may seem strange that I believe the Microsoft/Novell agreement will be great for Linux. But I do. Why?

Display top CPU processes Using htop

Filed under
HowTos

htop is a very competent interactive process viewer for the shell, providing all the functionality - and more - that the top utility does, in an easier and more intuitive way. htop provides easy-to-use menus for most operations and also has support for using a mouse.

Creating a managed website—Part 2

Filed under
HowTos

Free software Content Management Systems (CMS) are capable of running most websites these days. Indeed, low initial costs and strong community-based support mean that many sites which can’t afford a proprietary CMS can now benefit from the facilities a CMS provides. I’ll get down to the nitty gritty of selecting a CMS, installing it and setting up and promoting your site.

Smarter YaST Control Center for openSUSE 10.2

Filed under
Software

If you're annoyed by the openSUSE 10.2 YaST Control Center not remembering its last size (but starting always too small/with one column) as me, my home project in the openSUSE Build Service has a yast2-control-center package which does.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

GeckoLinux 421 Plasma and SUSE Hack Week

  • GeckoLinux 421 Plasma review - It ain't no dragon
    I heard a lot of good praise about this little distro. My inbox is flooded with requests to take it for a spin, so I decided, hey, so many people are asking. Let us. The thing is, openSUSE derivatives are far and few in between, but the potential and the appeal are definitely there. Something like CentOS on steroids, the way Stella did once, the same noble way Fuduntu tried to emancipate Fedora. Take a somewhat somber distro and pimpify it into submission. GeckoLinux is based on openSUSE Leap, and I chose the Plasma Static edition. There's also a Rolling version, based on Tumbleweed, but that one never worked for me. The test box for this review is Lenovo G50. But wait! Dedoimedo, did you not recently write in your second rejection report that GeckoLinux had failed to boot? Indeed I did. But the combo of yet another firmware update on the laptop and a fresh new download fixed it, allowing for a DVD boot. Somewhat like the painful but successful Fedora exercise back in the day. Tough start, but let's see what gives.
  • La Mapería
    It is Hack Week at SUSE, and I am working on La Mapería (the map store), a little program to generate beautiful printed maps from OpenStreetMap data.
  • HackWeek XIV @SUSE: Tuesday

From Vista 10 to Linux Mint

  • Microsoft Scared into Changes, 5 Reasons to Ditch
    Following a small claims court judgment against them, Microsoft announced they would be making declining their Windows 10 upgrade easier. Why not just switch to Linux as Daniel Robinson highlighted five reasons you should. My Linux Rig spoke to Christine Hall of FOSS Force about her "Linux rig" today and Bryan Lunduke had some thoughts on Canonical's collaboration myth. Dedoimedo reviewed GeckoLinux 421 and Gary Newell tested Peppermint 7 on his new Lenovo Ideapad.
  • After Multi-Month Tone Deaf Shitshow, Microsoft Finally Lets Users Control Obnoxious Windows 10 Upgrade
    Microsoft's decision to offer Windows 10 as a free upgrade to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 made sense on its surface. It was a nice freebie for users happy to upgrade, and an effective way to herd customers on older Windows iterations onto the latest platform to help consolidate support expense. But Microsoft's upgrade in practice has seen no shortage of criticism from users annoyed by a total lack of control over the update, and Microsoft's violent tone deafness in response to the complaints. For example a Reddit post from an anti-poaching organization made the rounds earlier this year after the 17 GB automatic Windows 10 update resulted in huge per megabyte charges from their satellite broadband ISP. Microsoft's response to these complaints? Ignore them. As complaints grew, Microsoft finally provided a way to fully disable the forced upgrade, but made sure it involved forcing users to modify the registry, something Microsoft knew full well less technical users wouldn't be comfortable attempting to hurdle. [...] Things have been escalating ever since, often to comedic effect. But this week things changed somewhat with the news that Microsoft has struck a $10,000 settlement with a California woman who sued the company after an ill-timed Windows 10 upgrade brought her office computers to a crawl. The woman took Microsoft to court after support failed to help resolve the issue, a spokesman saying Microsoft halted its appeal of the ruling "to avoid the expense of further litigation."
  • Microsoft pays $10,000 to unwilling Windows 10 updater
  • The Linux Setup - Christine Hall, FOSS Force
    On my main desktop, I use Linux Mint 17.1, Rebecca. My main laptop, a 64-bit machine, is running Mint 17.2 Rafaela. The laptop got updated from Rebecca so I could write a review, but the desktop never got upgraded because it’s a 32-bit machine and would require another download, which I haven’t had the time to do. I have another laptop running Bodhi, which might be my favorite distro, but I can be more productive with Mint.
  • Linux Mint 18 Finally Arrives — Download Cinnamon and MATE Edition ISO Files Here
    The wait for the summer’s hottest Linux distro is over and you can finally download the release version of Linux Mint 18 “Sarah”. Often called the best Linux distribution for desktop PCs, Mint 18 comes loaded with new features and Linux 4.4 LTS Kernel.

AMD and Linux

  • The Updated AMD Polaris Firmware Blobs Needed For RX 480 Support Land
    One day ahead of the Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" launch, the necessary firmware updates for the production graphics card support have landed in linux-firmware.git.
  • AMD RX 480 released, AMD will possibly open up Radeon Software
    The next generation of AMD GPU's have launched, and it begins with the AMD RX 480. Benchmarks are now out there along with plenty of info. I don't have the card myself as I have no contacts at AMD, but luckily Phoronix managed to bag a card and he's done plenty of testing as you can imagine. I will be referencing the green site due to other sites obviously focusing on Windows.