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Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE Ships Release Candidate of Applications and Platform 4.14 Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 2:19am
Story Answering questions regarding the Fedora Security Team Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 1:05am
Story Linux-based home automation hub gains Android app Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 12:51am
Story Open-Source Space Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 12:46am
Story Zorin OS 9 - Linux for Windows users Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2014 - 12:39am
Story GSA CIO calls for open source to be considered first Roy Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 9:08pm
Story Mitro Releases a New Free & Open Source Password Manager Roy Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 9:05pm
Story Marvell lifts curtain on popular NAS SoCs Rianne Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 8:55pm
Story A Week in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 8:23pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 31/07/2014 - 8:12pm

KDE 4.04: Bad, Just Plain Bad

Filed under
KDE

practical-tech.com: I wanted to like KDE 4. I really did. I can’t. It is the most annoying GUI (graphical user interface) I’ve used in years. And, yes, I’m including Vista’s slow as sludge Aero in my evaluation.

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ripping Videos for MythTV with AcidRip

  • Setting up your Huawei E220 3G USB Device on Ubuntu
  • Linux Security: Easy as 1-2-3
  • Easy RPM packet preparation
  • Changing the GRUB background in openSUSE
  • Linux Lessons : Installing to USB/CD
  • 8 Most Useful Commands and Keyboard Shortcuts Linux Newbies Should Know
  • Build your own ultimate boot disc
  • Quickzi: How To Delete Bash History
  • Locking Down Xubuntu LTSP

LinuxQuestions.org Turns 8

Filed under
Web

linuxquestions.org: It was on June 25, 2000 that I made the very first post at LQ, introducing it to the world. Fast forward eight years and we have almost 3,200,000 posts and over 350,000 registered members.

Dear Microsoft, thanks for the help, Linux

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: You gotta love it. Microsoft has decided that it will ho ahead and kill off easy access to XP on June 30th. On behalf of desktop Linux users everywhere, and our first cousins, the Mac fans, thanks. You've given us the best shot we'll ever have of taking the desktop.

OxygenOffice-2.4.1 Blues on Mandriva 2008 PowerPack

Filed under
Software

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Enough Open XML and ODF battle for standards. The topic of "which is the better" apart, the bare truth is that many people have to deal with docx, xlsx and pptx files, willingly or unwillingly.

PackageKit finds sweet spot in quest for universal package tools

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Different GNU/Linux distributions provide incompatible systems for package management, and to date no one has quite figured out a foolproof way to get the best of them all. But where the alien utility tries to convert between major package formats, and Smart and Klik try to imagine new, universal forms of software installation, PackageKit has the more modest goal of supplying a universal front end that leaves the native package systems intact underneath.

A Cow Says Moo!

Filed under
Software

cookingwithlinux.com: Once upon a time, ASCII art was practiced in e-mail messages sent around the world. Unfortunately, fancy fonts and HTML-ized e-mails have struck a powerful blow to this ancient and noble art form. The most missed are probably the cows, for Tony Monroe, anyhow.

Do we really need another packaging system?

Filed under
Software

loupgaroublond.blogspot: Recently I've been quoted by Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols for questioning the need for the LSB Package API. The kind of conversation going on over the LSB Package API has been a recurring theme ever since I started using Linux, and it contains quite a few fallacies I would like to put down.

First Significant Disappointments with Linux

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I've run into the first significant problems with Linux on my laptops. I had pretty much decided to go with a dual-boot XP/Ubuntu setup on my main laptop (S6510), the same as what I am currently using on the test laptop (S2110). So I tried it... and uh-oh...

The new wave of Linux Lite – lean, mean and green

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Linux is coming to an ultraportable near you! There’s no denying the smash-hit success Linux is enjoying in the budget price ultraportable market. These are the Linux desktops that will catch on and here’s why.

4 Little Known Thunderbird Extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux-blog.org: I recently searched through the mozilla thunderbird extensions website and found 4 extensions that I didn't know about that actually prove to be quite useful. I use Thunderbird 2.0.0.12 on Foresight Linux and have tested all of these extensions and verified that they work on that environment.

7 young GNOME apps from a new generation

Filed under
Software

blogs.gnome.org/bolsh: With the recent discussion in blogs around the GNOME world, it can be easy to forget that there have been some great new applications for GNOME appearing recently. Many of these are written by a new breed of GNOME developer.

Will the internet really improve the way we think?

Filed under
Linux

In a recent interview with the British Sunday Observer, Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia, claimed that “it’s the next billion [internet users] who will change the way we think”. Such a big claim deserves some critical house room. Will the internet really change the way we think? Or are we just getting carried away?

Kubuntu 8.04: Hello Old Friend

Filed under
Ubuntu

raiden.net: Have you ever run into an old friend, whom you've not seen in a long time? I experienced this recently with a Kubuntu install. You see, I used to be a heavy KDE user and really loved using it. I took the time to look at a few other distributions before deciding to give Kubuntu a shot.

Ubuntu Linux not for ! Puppy Linux Rocks.

Filed under
Linux

blog.creativewebsaz: So a friend gave me her old computer and says ‘ I can’t use it, it has a virus or something’. Turns out it didn’t have a virus it had a huge problem with the hardrive. Of course with all the buzz I immediately went to Ubuntu. It was a wrong decision.

20 Reasons Linux Users Like Linux (and you might, too)

Filed under
Linux

suseblog.com: One of the major inhibitors to the spreading of Linux, as I see it, is that people don’t know why they should try it. Other reasons may include lack of support for their favorite game, or that Photoshop doesn’t run on Linux. For those of us who weren’t stopped by those reasons, why did we switch? What is it about Linux that makes it a viable alternative?

Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch

Filed under
MDV
SUSE
-s

Last fall when the two mega-distros openSUSE and Mandriva both hit the mirrors, it was difficult to decide which I liked better. In an attempt to narrow it down, I ran some light-hearted tests and found Mandriva won out in a side-by-side comparison. But things change rapidly in the Linux world and I wondered how a competition of the newest releases would come out. Mandriva 2008.1 was released this past April and openSUSE 11.0 was released just last week.

24 hours with openSUSE 11.0

Filed under
SUSE

bear454.blogspot: 24 hours. Not 'a day'; not figuratively; I've spent 24 hours with the recently released update to my long-running favorite OS. OpenSUSE Linux 11.0 is revolutionary, but my enthusiasm is tempered by substantial regressions.

Also: OpenSUSE 11.0 on a Lenovo ThinkPad T61

few early howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Firefox 3 Tips & Tricks

  • Quick documents from the desktop
  • How to personalize a package’s CFLAGS in Gentoo
  • Resolve Windows (Netbios) Hostname in Ubuntu
  • Simple Perl Script To Ease Console Server Use On Linux And Unix
  • How to install Mplayer codecs in openSUSE 11-x86_64

Kernel space: drivers that don't make the kernel scene

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Linux supports most hardware "out of the box" without adding a driver. Most of the missing drivers are proprietary, from uncooperative manufacturers, but there are a few where the license is right but the actual code is still missing. Why?

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more