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About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story What happens to open source vendors when they get mature Rianne Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 11:05am
Story Linux-powered quadcopter acts like a smart shuttlecock Rianne Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 10:54am
Story Xiaomi’s MIUI overlay makes Android prettier, more clever Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 10:42am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 2:06am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 2:05am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 2:04am
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 2:02am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 11:11pm
Story The Open-Source Question Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 11:00pm
Story Reactions to “Has modern Linux lost its way?” and the value of simplicity Roy Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 10:42pm

This Just In: Dell Says, "Linux, I Choose You."

Filed under
SUSE

daniweb.com/blogs: Well, well, how about that Dell? In a landmark decision, Dell announced that it has penned a deal to use Novell's SUSE Linux in its data centers to power its new OptiPlex FX 160 thin client systems. Wow.

Book Review: A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

desktoplinux.com: Mark G. Sobell's freshly revised reference work on Ubuntu Linux may be the most impressive computer book I've seen in the last 10 years. If you are currently stranded with a pile of abandoned computers on a desert isle, I'm telling you, this is the book.

In Open Source I trust: Top 5 projects for daily use

Filed under
Software

snowwrites.com: There are days when I marvel at how far I’ve come since 2001 when the extent of my web experience was Front Page and basic html. In 2001 I met my boyfriend and he introduced me to the wonders of Open Source.

Syria and Lebanon Go Open Source

Filed under
OSS

mediaoriente.com: A good news for the open source scene. Two great events are running -or going to run- this month in the Arab region.

Why Would Windows 7's Success Necessarily Doom Linux?

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Perhaps it's inevitable -- people react strongly to hyperbole, it gets them talking, it makes them curious, it's a quick way of making a subject hot.

Having Good Functional Running Old PC's

Filed under
Software

lamundofloss.blogspot: A lot of us have old PCs stuck in the corners of classrooms, machines we just can’t afford to replace and whose owners just can’t do without. Normally for FOSS people like me its a YEHEY think to put in Linux in those running Boxes.

Brace for impact

Filed under
Gentoo

flameeyes.eu: Today I was looking around for a bug in autoconf, and I noticed one interesting bit out of the NEWS file of the current git version:

Benchmarked: Ubuntu vs Vista vs Windows 7

Filed under
OS

tuxradar.com: A lot of people have been chattering about the improvements Windows 7 brings for Windows users, but how does it compare to Ubuntu in real-world tests?

Waiting on Red Hat's response to Microsoft

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

cnet.com: In a recent CNET interview with Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, Ballmer calls out two "primary forces" for Microsoft in the enterprise: Oracle and Linux. These are the things that keep Microsoft's Ballmer up at night.

HP releases netbook interface for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

downloadsquad.com: Hewlett Packard has released a custom version of Ubuntu Linux designed for netbooks. For the HP Mini 1000 Mi Edition, to be exact.

Content links

A New Kiowa Linux On The Way

Filed under
Linux

oneclicklinux.com: I just received an email from Matt Portner regarding the release of the latest version of Kiowa Linux! Check out what Kiowa Linux has in store for us:

Simple Tips for the New User to remember about Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

raiden.net: There are numerous little things that a new user should learn and remember when it comes to Linux. These will also save you from a lot of trouble as you learn Linux.

The move to Linux, stymied by hardware

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: With news today of Windows 7 being made available in no less than six different versions, it is getting harder and harder to not move lock, stock, and PGP key to Linux on a full time basis. Except…

Windows is a Waste of Time

Filed under
Microsoft

gnuru.org: Some years ago studies were produced to show that the introduction of IT did not increase productivity in organisations. "Why not?" wondered all and sundry. Well, here's an idea for an answer: Windows.

Microsoft Leaves the Door Wide Open for Linux on Netbooks

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linugadgetech.blogspot: According to an article on Computerworld, Microsoft plans to offer six different versions of Windows 7. The lightest version of the OS will be Windows 7 Starter Edition. It limits users to a maximum of three open applications.

Game up for desktop Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

fmtech.co.za: With Microsoft readying itself for the release of a fast, streamlined operating system in Windows 7, the Linux community needs to pull the proverbial rabbit out of the hat if the free and open-source operating system is to stay relevant on desktop computers.

Canadian Government Considers Open Source

Filed under
OSS

opendotdotdot.blogspot: The Canadian Government has put out a "Request For Information" (RFI) - essentially, a formal invitation for feedback on the topic.

I Give Up: Civilization Is A Bust. Quick, Back To The Caves!

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: I'm sorry, I failed to bring the human race to terms with computers. But just look at what I had to work with! You see, I have a handicap. I don't have Alzheimer's disease.

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GitLab Web IDE

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Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
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