Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Another Programming Language for Kids, but This One Is Impressive

Filed under
Software

codingexperiments.com: I just spent today spending my time with an interesting little app, Scratch. It’s a cool little application that introduces children and early teens to programming and animation.

My Newfound Love for Xfce!

Filed under
Software

ericsbinaryworld.com/blogs: For the past week to two weeks I’ve done something I had’t done in years - I switched my default desktop environment in my GDM login screen. I’ve been logging into Xfce instead of my usual Gnome. There are basically three reasons why I’m loving Xfce over Gnome.

Interview with Jean-Philippe Guillemin, Zenwalk’s creator

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

oneopensource.it: Zenwalk is one of the most promising Linux distribution. Based on Slackware, the distro is lightweight, simple and stable. We decided to make some questions to Jean-Philippe Guillemin, Zenwalk’s creator, regarding future plans and developments about this “GNU-Linux Operating System”.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Lessons of the Linux revolution

  • VirtualBox B0rken By Gutsy Kernel Upgrade
  • OpenLX and KalCulate pair Linux distro with proprietary accounting app
  • Report: Open Source City in Liverpool
  • Jim Zemlin: Nokia Launches a Full Scale War for the Mobile OS
  • Kiss VMWare's rump good-bye
  • Linux vs. Closed-Source Kernel Modules
  • Firefox: checking for updates?
  • Mozilla Developer News June 24
  • Vi Assistant
  • Open source tour of Europe: The Netherlands
  • Mandriva: Compatibility & Drivers I
  • Europcar buys into Red Hat's allegedly nonexistent desktop
  • Open Source vs. Profit: Google Android (iPhone 3G), Linux (Microsoft Vista)
  • A low-cost education-use mobile computer 'LUKID'
  • Gdium, another Eee PC competitor
  • LOLspeak creeping into code

openSUSE 11.0 x86_64 Review

Filed under
SUSE

dtschmitz.com: I have finished setting up openSUSE 11.0 on my HP dv2000z AMD Turion64 X2. Up to version 10.3 I was running the 32-bit version of SUSE and decided now was a good time to do a 'New' install and give x86_64 a spin.

I Did It - Ubuntu Linux on my Laptop

Filed under
Ubuntu

browncoatcat.wordpress: The great thing about Linux, all the distributions, not just Ubuntu is that people share what they have learnt, and it is always possible to find help with a problem. So in this spirit of sharing, here is how I got my new laptop to work with Ubuntu Linux.

Acer Aspire One

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

cnet.com.au: The Acer Aspire One is better than most netbooks. It's fantastic for anyone who wants a small, cheap machine on which to type and surf the Web. However, its battery life lets it down slightly.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Chroot users with OpenSSH: An easier way to confine users to their home directories

  • Booting of a Live CD without a CD or an Emulator
  • Adding XFS Support to RHEL5
  • How to scan and OCR like a pro with open source tools
  • Linux And Unix System Security Wrap-Up - Part 4b
  • Vi Search and Replace
  • Ubuntu Hardy: How To Disable Synaptics Touchpad When Typing
  • Monitoring network performance with speedometer
  • Development with Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM)
  • Quickzi: How To Add a Line into the middle of a Text File
  • Making Music (Beats) on Linux/Ubuntu with Hydrogen

Arch Linux 2008.06

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: It’s taken some time, but here it is, the spankin new, fresh from the press Arch release, ambitiously called “Overlord”. In this review, I’ll have a look at it, and discuss a bit of the Arch philosophy in general.

Coders now can try mobile Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

cnet.com: Canonical on Tuesday released its first publicly available developer edition of Ubuntu for mobile Internet devices. Ubuntu MID works on two devices at present, the Samsung Q1U and the Intel Crown Beach.

ASUS Eee PC 901 Linux Edition Review

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

slashgear.com: If the ASUS Eee 900 basically amounted to a larger-screened version of the 7-inch original, then the Eee 901 marks its graduation into a distinct model. Thankfully they’ve subjected the 901 to a mild degree of fettling, tweaking case and controls and making for a markedly more attractive proposition.

openSUSE 11.0 Numbers?

Filed under
SUSE
  • Numbers?

  • First on openSUSE 11.0 Based KDE Four Live Release
  • Interview with Christer Edwards, Ubuntu Utah Founder
  • Staying with openSUSE - Switching to GNOME
  • Ubuntu faster than openSUSE?

What does it mean to be an Open Source author? A story from the inside

Filed under
OSS

jroller.com: I hear daily about open source projects, the open source business model, what it means in terms of freedom, choice, risks, investment, etc... What I rarely hear about is what is life like for those who actually contribute and dedicate a part of their life to open source?

Sorry Simon, but you’re still screwing up

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: In an interview with Builder AU Sun’s chief open source officer, Simon Phipps, admits that Sun “screwed up” regarding open source. But he isolates the “screw-up” to 2001-2002, when Sun was still a proprietary company. This is like a candidate for re-election blaming the problems he faces on a predecessor from the other party.

coLinux gets its second wind

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Cooperative Linux (coLinux for short) occupies a unique niche in the field of virtualization -- that of running GNU/Linux natively in Windows. Now, with the current interest in attracting Windows users to GNU/Linux, as evidenced by such tools as Ubuntu's Wubi and Fedora's Live USB-Creator, the technology behind coLinux seems overdue for a closer look.

Open Up To The World Of Opportunities With Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

seofreelisting.com: Linux is a widely used operating system, which has recently launched ubuntu, a program allows the users to customize desktops and perform several functions easily.

Also: Ubuntu "Hardy Heron" -- Observations After Upgrading

Modeling Furniture in Blender

Filed under
HowTos

packtpub.com: As furniture is a key element, every item of furniture that we add to the scene increases the level of detail, and the sense of realism. We can classify furniture into two : internal and external furniture. With the first type, we have all the objects that populate our interior scenes such as sofas, beds, and chairs. The second type refers to items of urban furniture such as cars, fountains, and fences.

Linux Graphics, a Tale of Three Drivers

Filed under
HowTos

linuxfoundation.org: The purpose of this essay is to illustrate by example the strengths and weaknesses of the open source development model versus the binary driver one. The three graphics drivers in question are Intel, ATI and Nvidia. Between them they account for a majority of the graphics market.

Write fast 3D software without a PhD

Filed under
Software
HowTos

fosswire.com: There are two kinds of fast in programming: Fast to code and fast to run. 3D applications and games are known to be speedy. But the time it takes to write and understand the code behind it? Not so much. On the flipside, many abstraction layers designed to make coding easier usually aren’t very efficient. So where’s the median?

A Date with Elyssa

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: I was really impressed with the past versions of Mint, so I made a vow to always keep track of its latest development. Since Mint 5 is derived from Ubuntu 8.04 LTS, I expect it to be filled with exciting new features.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more