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Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Has The Sky Fallen? Qualcomm Contributes To Freedreno's DRM/KMS Driver Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 2:18pm
Story New Projects from the Ever-Protean World of Open Source Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 2:16pm
Story Microsoft 'loves' Linux? Then stop attacking open source Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 2:02pm
Story Window and Desktop Switcher moved to Look’n’Feel Package Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 1:30pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 10:30am
Story Quick Look: Puppy Linux 6.0 Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 10:04am
Story How to train your doctor... to use open source Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 9:14am
Story Sony Xperia devices are sendng your data to China Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 8:18am
Story Nexus 6 Pre-Orders Were A Joke Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 8:11am
Story Fedora 21 Beta status is Go, release on November 4, 2014 Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 8:00am

Funtoo Updates

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.funtoo.org: Per request on this blog, I am now building ~pentium4 Funtoo (unstable) stages. Starting with the October 1st ~x86 build, all Funtoo (unstable) stage3 builds now include dhcpcd and git.

Ubuntu 8.10 Beta Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: The beta version of the upcoming Ubuntu 8.10 (codename Intrepid Ibex), which is scheduled for release in late October this year, arrived a few minutes ago and, as usual, we intend to keep you up-to-date with the latest changes in the Ubuntu 8.10 development.

coupla shorts

Filed under
Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Setting up 2 IP address on "One" NIC (Redhat/Fedora)

  • Speeding up SpamAssassin rule processing on Debian and Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Ctrl+Alt+Delete (CAD) Key Sequence
  • Project management over the Web with Collabtive
  • Differences between Packet and Statefull Firewalls
  • Linux Package Manager Cheatsheet
  • KDE4: Resolving the "call to lnusertemp failed" issue
  • This isn’t your grandpappy’s dd command

How often do we need GNU/Linux releases?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Of what use is an operating system if all it does is to make you look forward to the next release - simply because umpteen bugs have been introduced by all the new features in the current version?

HP 2133 Mini-Note broken by own updates

Filed under
Hardware
SUSE

venturecake.com: We’ve recently been casting our eye over HP’s 2133 Mini-Note. We thought we’d check out reports on how Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop performs on the beast. Generally quite well, it seems - with one exception.

Interview with Linux guru Vincent Danen

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

blogs.techrepublic.com: In this Inside TechRepublic podcast, Sonja Thompson talks to Vincent Danen, one of TechRepublic’s Linux gurus and long-time newsletter tip contributors.

Broadcom Switches to the Light Side: The Start of a New Era?

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

workswithu.com: As anyone familiar with the Linux wireless scene before 2006 knows, Broadcom, which manufacturers the wireless chipsets found in many laptops, was for a long time synonymous with everything evil about closed-source software. That’s changing. Here’s how.

5 GIMP Tricks Everyone Should Know

Filed under
GIMP
HowTos

helpforlinux.blogspot: Having used both GIMP and Adobe Photoshop I must say I personally believe GIMP is much better for common folks like you and me. I decided to make this tutorial for those who still haven't discovered the magic of GIMP and don't know how to use GIMP productively.

Is the end near for independent open source?

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: I worry for Red Hat. As I wrote the other day, if Red Hat's stock continues to tumble it becomes ripe for an Oracle acquisition. Losing Red Hat as an independent open-source vendor would effectively call an end to open source as a standalone software strategy.

Linux Rooted in Fiction: ParanoidLinux

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: If the fact that this Linux distribution (now in an "alpha-alpha stage") is based on a work of science fiction isn't unsettling, consider two key peripheral issues.

Is Microsoft trying to take control of ODF?

Filed under
Microsoft

heise-online.co.uk: After a recent meeting of the SC 34 committee, the ISO/IEC group responsible for OOXML, Groklaw are reporting that they believe Microsoft are trying to take control of the Open Document Format (ODF), the uncontroversial open document format standard.

Intel Provides Temporary e1000e Fix

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Last night Intel folks posted a patch protecting the card (marking the memory read only, and disabling the possibility to set it read/write until next reboot). That means that it's now much safer to use e1000e with this patch applied than disabling it.

Sbopkg provides seamless package repository integration for Slackware

Filed under
Software

linux.com: No Linux distribution can bundle every package that users might want, so most distros host software repositories from which users can download and install additional applications. Sbopkg is a new ncurses-based utility that helps users build packages from SlackBuilds.org and seamlessly integrates the repository with the operating system.

Build better blogs with Linux

Filed under
HowTos

itwire.com: Chances are you have some sort of web site. Linux has a rich history of text processing which can be used to turbo-boost your blogs. In fact, blogging goes to Linux like a hand to a glove.

Linux Gazette Issue October 2008 (#155) Available

Filed under
Linux

The October issue of Linux Gazette is online and ready to read. Highlights include: Away Mission: Google I/O and Better Software Practices, HugeTLB - Large Page Support in the Linux Kernel, and Book Review: Understanding Open Source and Free Software Licensing.

The Perfect Desktop - gOS 3.0 Gadgets

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a gOS 3.0 Gadgets desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

Learning about Linux - the easy way

Filed under
Linux

frrl.wordpress: Linux is seen as an alternative to Windows. So if you are one of those who does not want to be “assimilated into the collective” of Microsoft then maybe Linux is for you.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Vs. Unix: The Sins Of The Father?

  • Adobe “Answers” More Linux Questions
  • Gentoo not cutting edge anymore
  • Bash Parameter Expansion
  • Ubuntu misses the memo on Stallman's cloud computing rant
  • OpenGoo delivers the best of CRM and project management
  • Software Freedom Day Report
  • FSF reboots its High Priority list with a grant and call for input
  • Converting .bin/.cue to .iso
  • Norwegians leave their Standards Body in protest
  • Push and pull network filesystems with ccgfs
  • Going Virtual with VirtualBox
  • parallel programming?
  • Gentoo is Doing the Job—Time to Format XP!
  • Typical browser users?

Review: Antix 7.5

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: It’s time once again for a Linux distro review. This month, Antix 7.5 was included on the LXF DVD. It’s another light distro, so I will use the same metrics I used in the Lightweight Linux Throwdown. Antix is based upon Mepis which is, in turn, based upon Debian.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.