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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

What will Fedora be?

Filed under
Linux

mmcgrath.livejournal: I popped the question back in July on FAB about Fedora's Target market. Since then I've seen some interesting theories about it. Combined with a bit more thinking and off-line discussions I've come up with my own theory. Part prediction and part wishful thinking, I hope others will agree.

KDE Proves the Value of Iterative Releases

Filed under
KDE

leenuxnews: I really think the delays and underwhelming betas are a strong indicator of why OSS projects should not try to replicate the long term release cycles of the closed source (Windows) world.

Debugging Samba: Deciphering Access Denied

Filed under
HowTos

searchenterpriselinux: The next time a user comes knocking with an Access Denied error message and blames it on Samba, tell him to slow down. Most of the time, it's not Samba's fault, said Samba release manager Jerry Carter. "Our motto is 'Bug for bug, feature for feature, we are completely compatible with Microsoft Windows,''" he said.

Designing a basic Asterisk VOIP system for SIP clients

Filed under
HowTos

zdnet: Asterisk is becoming an increasingly popular way for organizations to deploy Voice over IP (VoIP) without making a huge investment in proprietary systems. One of the major hurdles to get over when deploying Asterisk is to learn how the different configuration files work together and how to configure the system to answer phones.

Acacia Technologies Enters into License Agreement with Novell

Filed under
SUSE

broadcastnewsroom: Acacia Research Corporation announced today that its Disc Link Corporation subsidiary, which is part of its Acacia Technologies group, a leader in technology licensing, has entered into a license agreement with Novell, Inc. covering patents relating to portable storage devices with links.

FSF Brand Ambassador

Filed under
Linux

We need to realize the importance of FSF brand ambassadors. We need to create awareness amongst various distribution maintainers about these ambassadors. The community should raise its voice and make sure that these brand ambassadors are always included in their distribution of choice. Only then we will be able to see FSF prosper.

Really Late Review of Fedora 7

Filed under
Linux

LinuxElectrons: This Fedora 7 review is really late, especially with Fedora 8 just around the corner. Nevertheless, I feel compelled to write since its my latest switch from OpenSUSE 10.2.

My first impressions of my Dell 1420n with Ubuntu pre-installed.

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica forums: It's obvious it's still Linux and has it's warts. I mean when I first booted it took a bit for the bios to initialize. I don't know what that was about, but took about 30 seconds. Never saw that on my Ibook.

How Linus copes with criticism

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: So, you want to be a kernel hacker. Before you go down that path, or get involved with any other free or open source development project, you should know that it's often a wild, raucous place where -- no matter what level of coding skill you possess -- your tolerance for criticism or rejection might constantly be tested. Even Linus Torvalds isn't immune to criticism.

OpenBSD: Stealing Versus Sharing Code

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: OpenBSD project creator Theo de Raadt detailed his concerns regarding BSD-licensed code and Dual-BSD/GPL-licensed code being re-licensed under only the GPL as previously discussed here, "honestly, I was greatly troubled by the situation, because even people like Alan Cox were giving other Linux developers advice to ... break the law."

KPackage - GUI package administration and management alternative

Filed under
Software

vertito.blogspot: Linux administration of RPM packages from linux boxes is basically required for keeping up and maintaining your package database tight, neat, and clean linux boxes. This has been possible from command line terminal ever since RedHat become well know.

NetBSD and Lighttpd help put three 200 MHz PCs put to good use

Filed under
BSD

pinderkent.blogsavy: I’m a staunch supporter of putting old, but working, computers to good use again. Personally, I have repurposed numerous systems back into production after they were deemed to be too old, and replaced with newer hardware. One of my favourite tools for enabling this is NetBSD.

How To Get Out of the Microsoft Habit

Filed under
Linux

bri-computer.blogspot: If you're like me, a total cheapskate, I believe that you would do well on Ubuntu or PCLinuxOS. Both are very user friendly, and I was blown away by the two Operating Systems.

Avoiding the very appearance of evil at Google

Filed under
Google

matt asay: The Economist has an amazingly good article this week on Google, and its growing influence and power. Rather than ring alarm bells about Google's sometimes casual approach to privacy concerns, the article suggests that Google needs a deeper change of heart.

Gentoo forums scheduled downtime

Filed under
Gentoo
Web

gentoo.org: The database will be shutdown and backed up, final consistency checks will be performed, and pending the unforseen, the conversion to full UTF-8 support is the last step. The forums will be shutdown during this time. This activity is scheduled to start on 2007-09-08.

today's leftover links

Filed under
News
  • 2007 OLF Speakers

  • Nero burns on Linux
  • Motorola's Linux phone arrives at U.S. stores
  • Free x86 Linux router distro rev'd
  • Finally! Upgraded to 7.04 "Feisty"
  • Open source booming in K-12 education
  • Email marketer harnesses the power of Gentoo
  • Two More Linux Games
  • Command line tip - add a user from the command line
  • Finstall: New GUI installer for FreeBSD Operating System
  • Xandros CEO Andreas Typaldos: Getting Along With Redmond
  • Video on the Web: Browser Support

Review: A first look at Puppy Linux 2.17

Filed under
Linux

CLICK: Since my Puppy 2.16 review took so long that 2.17 came out before I finished it, I decided to dive into Puppy 2.17 now so I don't get beat by 2.18 (though I offer no guarantees).

Linux: Killing Tasks On Frozen NFS Mounts

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I've long hated the non-killability of tasks accessing a dead NFS server," Matthew Wilcox said along with a prototype patch to fix the issue based on a 2002 posting by Linus Torvalds.

Novell's Linux Leanings

Filed under
SUSE

Motley Fool: Novell came up aces in its third-quarter report yesterday. The fact that revenues grew means a couple of good things for the software platform designer.

Short-Term/Long-Term: The Battle of OOXML

Filed under
Microsoft

Linux Today: It was, for me, a fascinating study of short-term versus long-term as I watched the proceedings surrounding the standardization process of Microsoft's Open XML document format unfold this week. But then, I am easily fascinated.

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.

Development News

  • Oh, the things Vim could teach Silicon Valley's code slingers
    Vim text editor turned 25 late last year – the first public iteration was launched on November 2, 1991, a couple of weeks after Linus Torvalds announced Linux. To celebrate Vim's anniversary, creator Bram Moolenaar recently dropped version 8.0. Ordinarily the update of a text editor wouldn't be worth mentioning, but this is the first major Vim release in ten years. In today's world, where web browsers drop major point updates (what they consider major, anyway) several times a year, Vim's lack of major updates is not just refreshing, but speaks of an entirely different approach to developing software. Even leaving aside the absurd version system of today's web browsers, eight releases in 25 years would be considered slow by today's software development standards. Interestingly, though, Vim's biggest rival, GNU Emacs, has a roughly similar development pace. GNU Emacs began life in the 1970s and is currently at version 25, which means it averages two releases to Vim's one, but still definitely on the slow side.
  • Learn to code site Code.org loses student work due to index bug
    Learn-to-code site Code.org is apologising to its students after being caught by a database table maxing out, and dropping progress for an unknown number of participants. In its mea-culpa blog post, the group says it was burned by a database table with a 32-bit index.
  • GCC 7.0 Lands The BRIG Frontend For AMD's HSA
    GCC 7 moved on to only bug/documentation fixes but an exception was granted to allow the BRIG front-end to land for AMD's HSA support in this year's GNU Compiler Collection update. As of this morning, the BRIG front-end has merged. BRIG is the binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). This BRING front-end also brings the libhsail-rt run-time into GCC. So far BRIG in GCC has just been tested on Linux x86_64.